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Marilyn Manson (band)

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This article is about the band. For the person, see Marilyn Manson.

Marilyn Manson
Marilyn Manson Live in Moscow 2012.JPG
Marilyn Manson performing in 2012.

Background information

Origin
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States
Genres
Industrial rock[1] ·
 industrial metal ·
 hard rock[2] ·
 gothic rock ·
 alternative metal[3]
 
Years active
1989-present
Labels
Hell, etc., Cooking Vinyl,[4][5] Nothing, Interscope
Associated acts
Nine Inch Nails, Satan on Fire, Jack off Jill, Rob Zombie, Alice Cooper, Rammstein, Slayer, Slipknot, Godhead, The Prodigy, Danzig, Korn, Monster Magnet, Rasputina
Website
www.marilynmanson.com


Members
Marilyn Manson
Twiggy Ramirez
 Paul Wiley
Gil Sharone


Past members
Daisy Berkowitz
Olivia Newton Bundy
Zsa Zsa Speck
Madonna Wayne Gacy
Gidget Gein
Sara Lee Lucas
Ginger Fish
Zim Zum
John 5
Tim Sköld
Chris Vrenna
Fred Sablan
Tyler Bates
Marilyn Manson is an American rock band from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Formed in 1989 by frontman Marilyn Manson and Daisy Berkowitz, the group was originally named Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids with their theatrical performances gathering a local cult following in the early 1990s. The band's lineup has changed between many of their album releases; the current members of Marilyn Manson are the eponymous lead singer (the only remaining original member), bassist Twiggy Ramirez and drummer Gil Sharone.
Until 1996, the name of each member was originally created by combining the first name of an iconic female sex symbol and the last name of an iconic serial killer (e.g., Marilyn Monroe and Charles Manson).[6][7] The members of the band dress in outlandish makeup and costumes, and have engaged in intentionally shocking behavior both onstage and off. In the past, their lyrics often received criticism for their anti-religious sentiment and references to sex, violence and drugs. Their performances have frequently been called offensive and obscene, and, on several occasions, protests and petitions have led to the group being banned from performing.
As this controversy began to wane throughout the 2000s, so did the band's mainstream popularity. Despite this, Jon Wiederhorn of MTV.com, in June 2003, referred to Marilyn Manson as "the only true artist today".[8] Marilyn Manson has garnered much success: in the US, three of the band's albums have been certified platinum while three more were certified gold, and the band has seen eight of its releases debut in the top ten,[9][10] including two number-one albums. VH1 has ranked Marilyn Manson as the seventy-eighth best rock band on their 100 Great Artists of Hard Rock.[11] Aggregate site AcclaimedMusic.net lists Marilyn Manson number 714 in their artist rank for greatest of all time.[12] Marilyn Manson has sold over 50 million records.[13][14][15][16][17]


Contents  [hide]
1 Band history 1.1 Origins 1.1.1 The Spooky Kids (1989–1992)
1.2 The Nothing years 1.2.1 Portrait of an American Family and Smells Like Children (1993–1995)
1.2.2 Antichrist Superstar (1996–1997)
1.2.3 Mechanical Animals (1998–1999)
1.2.4 Holy Wood (2000–2002)
1.2.5 The Golden Age of Grotesque and "farewell" (2003–2005)
1.3 The Interscope years 1.3.1 Eat Me, Drink Me (2006–2008)
1.3.2 The High End of Low (2008–2009)
1.4 The Cooking Vinyl years 1.4.1 Born Villain (2009–2013)
1.4.2 The Pale Emperor (2013-present)

2 Controversy 2.1 School shootings 2.1.1 Columbine massacre
2.1.2 Other shootings

3 Musical style 3.1 Influences
4 Band members
5 Discography
6 Awards 6.1 Billboard Music Video Awards
6.2 Grammy Awards
6.3 MTV Video Music Awards
6.4 Miscellaneous awards and honors
7 References 7.1 Literature
8 External links

Band history[edit]
Origins[edit]
The Spooky Kids (1989–1992)[edit]



 A 1992 flyer for a Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids show, with artwork by Marilyn Manson. It parodies Baphomet.
In 1989, Brian Warner was a college student working toward a journalism degree, and gaining experience in the field by writing music articles for a South Florida lifestyle magazine, 25th Parallel. He met Scott Putesky shortly afterward and, after showing him some lyrics and poems he had written, proposed that they form a band together.[18] Warner, guitarist Putesky, and bassist Brian Tutunick recorded their first demo tape as Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids in late 1989, taking on the stage names of Marilyn Manson, Daisy Berkowitz and Olivia Newton Bundy, respectively. They were soon joined by Stephen Bier, who called himself Madonna Wayne Gacy; Bundy was replaced by Gidget Gein, born Brad Stewart. In 1991, drummer Fred Streithorst joined the band, with the stage name Sara Lee Lucas.
The stage names used by each member were representative of a concept the band considered central: the dichotomy of good and evil, and the existence of both, together, in every whole. "Marilyn Monroe had a dark side", explained Manson in his autobiography, "just as Charles Manson has a good, intelligent side".[19] Images of both Monroe and Manson, as well as of others equally famous and notorious, were common in the band's early promotional materials.
The Spooky Kids' popularity in the area grew quickly, largely because of radio DJ Scott David of WYNX-FM, an early fan who eagerly played songs from the band's demo tapes on the air; and because of the band's highly visual concerts, which drew from performance art and used many shock techniques. It was not uncommon to see onstage "naked women nailed to a cross, a child in a cage, or bloody animal body parts";[20] Manson, Berkowitz, and Gein variously performed in women's clothing or bizarre costumes; and, for lack of a professional pyrotechnician, they would occasionally set their own stage props on fire. The band would dramatically contrast these grotesque theatrics with elements drawn from the culture of the members' youth in the 1970s and 1980s: characters from that era's children's television made regular, often somewhat altered, appearances on Marilyn Manson flyers and newsletters, and were frequently sampled in the music. They continued to perform and release cassettes—shortening their name to Marilyn Manson in 1992—until the summer of 1993, when the band drew the attention of Trent Reznor, who at the time had just founded his own record label, Nothing Records.[2]
The Nothing years[edit]
Portrait of an American Family and Smells Like Children (1993–1995)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Nothing Records' "A Night of Nothing" industry showcase.
Reznor offered Marilyn Manson a contract with his new label and the opportunity to support Nine Inch Nails on their upcoming headlining tour. The band accepted both offers, and recording sessions for its national debut, Portrait of an American Family, began in July 1993. Working with producer Roli Mosimann at Criteria Studios in Miami, Florida, the band recorded a selection of new songs along with material from their Spooky Kids repertoire and, by the end of Autumn 1993, had completed the first version of their debut, titled The Manson Family Album. However, it was not well received. The abrasive sonic "rawness" that Mosimann's production had brought to such groups as Swans had failed to materialize on The Manson Family Album; Reznor and all the band's members found it flat and lifeless, and poorly representative of Marilyn Manson's dynamic performances. "I thought, 'This really sucks', Manson explained, "so I played it for Trent, and he thought it sucked".[20] At the same time, the band was having difficulties with Gidget Gein, who had begun to lose control of his addiction to heroin. While reworking the album the band played two shows in South Florida under the name Mrs. Scabtree. Not much is known about the complete lineup, except that Manson performed on the drums, Gacy on keyboard, Berkowitz on guitar, and Jeordie White of Miami thrash band Amboog-a-Lard and Jessicka of Jack Off Jill sharing vocal duties. Four other local musicians, bassists Mark Dubin of Sister Venus and Patrick Joyce from The Itch, guitarist Miles Hie, and violinist Mary Karlzen, were also involved.[21][22]




Lunchbox







Album version, as it appeared on Portrait of an American Family

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Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)







Album version, as it appeared on Smells Like Children

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In October 1993, Reznor agreed to rework the production on Marilyn Manson's album, taking them and their tapes to The Record Plant in Los Angeles. Gein, who had been hospitalized after an overdose, was not invited. After seven weeks of mixing, remixing, and rerecording, the album — now titled Portrait of an American Family — was ready to be presented to Interscope Records. Even as the first single "Get Your Gunn" was beginning to receive radio airplay, Gein received a letter declaring his services "no longer needed" by the band after he overdosed on heroin for the fourth time; he was replaced by White, of Amboog-a-Lard,[23] who undertook the alias Twiggy Ramirez. In December 1993, Ramirez first performed as the band's new bass player on a week's worth of headline dates through Florida with Jack Off Jill opening. While playing Club 5 in Jacksonville, Florida Manson was accused by the town's Christian Coalition of violating the town's adult entertainment codes. Jack Off Jill singer Jessicka was accused of solicitation and offering to engage in lewdness. Both singers were arrested and charged with misdemeanors.[24] On the first date of a fourteen-week national tour opening for Nine Inch Nails, Ramirez made his national touring debut. It was during this tour that Manson had occasion to meet with Church of Satan founder Dr. Anton LaVey. After a cordial meeting, LaVey honored Manson with the title of "Reverend" — meaning, in the Church of Satan, a person who is revered by the church, and not necessarily one who dedicates his life to preaching the religion to others, as with a priest or minister. Manson would use this title in album liner notes, citing himself as "Reverend Marilyn Manson."
In March 1995, the band began its first national headlining tour, a two-month outing with Monster Voodoo Machine as support; this would be drummer Sara Lee Lucas' last tour with the band. Tension between Lucas and Manson had apparently grown as the tour wore on and, on the next-to-last night of the tour, Manson secretly decided to end the show with a flourish: during a performance of the then-current single, "Lunchbox", he doused Lucas' drum kit in lighter fluid and set it ablaze – with Lucas still attempting to play on behind it. (Manson apparently forgot that the band had one more date to play.) Lucas quit the band after the final gig the next night. Less than two weeks later his replacement, Kenneth Wilson, better known by his stage name Ginger Fish, joined the group. Marilyn Manson was touring again, this time on a bill with Danzig and Korn.
That tour ended in summer 1995, after which the band relocated to the new home of Nothing Studios in New Orleans, Louisiana to begin work on the third single from Portrait of an American Family, "Dope Hat". Accompanied by a music video which featured Manson in the role of Willy Wonka in a shock-horror version of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, the proposed single for "Dope Hat" eventually developed into an hour-long EP, Smells Like Children. The EP's fifteen tracks of covers, remixes, and bizarre sonic experiments also included the band's version of the Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", which would prove to be Marilyn Manson's first legitimate hit: the video was placed in heavy rotation on MTV (in stark contrast with the "Dope Hat" video, which MTV had banished to late-night airplay only a few months before) and the mainstream music press was suddenly clamoring to cover the group. It was also around this time that the group began to experiment with goth makeup, and more bizarre outfits.
A seven-month headlining tour followed, from June through February, during which the band began to debut new material including "Irresponsible Hate Anthem", "Minute of Decay", "Tourniquet", and "Smells Like Children" (an early incarnation of "Kinderfeld"). Rumors of a new album circulated widely during this time, and were confirmed when the band returned to Nothing's New Orleans studio in early 1996 to perform what Manson termed "a musical ritual designed to bring about the Apocalypse".[25]
Antichrist Superstar (1996–1997)[edit]



 Twiggy Ramirez live in Argentina during the "Dead to the World Tour".
Marilyn Manson's second full-length studio album, Antichrist Superstar, was released on October 8, 1996. The rock opera concept album was recorded at Nothing Studios with Trent Reznor himself acting as executive producer; the process of making the album was reportedly a long and difficult one, highlighted by experiments allegedly involving sleep deprivation and near-constant drug use in an effort to create an environment suited to the album's moody and occasionally violent content. During this time, antagonism between band members was high, which caused the departure of guitarist and Spooky Kids founding member Daisy Berkowitz. With Berkowitz out of the band, Twiggy Ramirez performed lead guitar for much of the recording of Antichrist Superstar, and the group placed an ad seeking a new guitarist for its upcoming tour; Timothy Linton, auditioned for and was given the position. Breaking with the six-year tradition of icon / killer naming structures, the newest member was dubbed Zim Zum – a name derived from Kabbalah,[26] one of the major sources of inspiration for the album.





The Beautiful People







Album version, as it appeared on Antichrist Superstar

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Tourniquet







Album version, as it appeared on Antichrist Superstar

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The album's first single, "The Beautiful People", made a fairly major impact on the alternative rock charts, and created enough anticipation for Antichrist Superstar that the album debuted at number three on the album charts.[27] The band's frontman was featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine who also awarded the band their Best New Artist accolade for 1996.[27] "I've always felt in my heart that we were going to get there," remarked Manson. "I don't think there's any reason why someone with as much to say as me should be limited to saying it to a few people. I should be on the same scale as the Spice Girls or Michael Jackson."[28]
The year-and-a-half long "Dead to the World Tour" in support of the album followed; it was the band's longest and widest-ranging tour yet, and included Marilyn Manson's live debut in Alaska, Hawaii, the United Kingdom, continental Europe, South America, Asia and Australia as their fame spread to all corners of the world. In the United States, however, the band was receiving more attention than ever before, and not all of it was positive.
As the tour was getting underway, the band found itself the target of congressional hearings, led by Senator Joseph Lieberman, to determine the effects, if any, of violent lyrics on young listeners. Lieberman would later go on to refer to Marilyn Manson as "perhaps the sickest group ever promoted by a mainstream record company".[29] In addition, nearly every performance on the tour was picketed by religious organizations, pleading with fans to not see the musician who once said "I think every time people listen to this new album maybe God will be destroyed in their brainwashed minds."[30]
On November 10, 1997, the band released a remix/live EP, Remix & Repent, featuring new versions of Antichrist Superstar's four singles, "The Beautiful People", "Tourniquet", "Antichrist Superstar", and "Man that You Fear", alongside songs recorded live on the U.S. leg of the Dead to the World Tour. Two unreleased songs from the Antichrist Superstar recording sessions were contributed to film soundtracks: "Apple of Sodom" to David Lynch's Lost Highway, and "The Suck for Your Solution" to the Howard Stern biopic Private Parts. As the year ended, Manson made the announcement of the upcoming publication of his first book, the autobiographical The Long Hard Road out of Hell; the book was released in February 1998, along with another live document of the world tour, a home video entitled Dead to the World. It also came to light around this time that Antichrist Superstar would be the first installment in a concept album trilogy and that the release of the follow-up was, according to the band, also imminent, accompanied by early rumors of the involvement of Billy Corgan and The Dust Brothers with the as-yet-untitled album.
Mechanical Animals (1998–1999)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson singing "The Speed of Pain" live.
On September 15, 1998, Marilyn Manson released the second part of his triptych, Mechanical Animals, an album strongly influenced by David Bowie and his 1974 album Diamond Dogs. Interscope's promotion of the album was massive, including an enormous billboard of singer Manson as an androgynous extraterrestrial over Times Square, and repeated appearances on MTV and other networks to promote the album and the single "The Dope Show"; propelled by the success of Antichrist Superstar and by this press push, the album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart.




The Dope Show







Album version, as it appeared on Mechanical Animals

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Coma White







Album version, as it appeared on Mechanical Animals

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The band had recast itself in a new image for this album; Marilyn Manson were now a glam rock outfit, setting aside the bleak darkness of the previous record for a more concealed morbidity and borrowing its visual presentation largely from Bowie, and from Roxy Music and its contemporaries. By this time, the band had permanently relocated to Los Angeles, and Zim Zum had been replaced by glam-influenced guitarist John Lowery, who joined the band as John 5.
After a brief promotional tour, the band set out on the "Beautiful Monsters Tour" with Hole and Monster Magnet as support. The tour, however, would be a problematic one: on March 1, 1999, the three bands played the first show in Spokane, Washington; by March 14, Hole had left the tour and Manson had broken his ankle, forcing postponements of some shows. The tour was then renamed the "Rock Is Dead Tour" and both Jack Off Jill and Nashville Pussy were asked to take select remaining opening slots on tour.[31] Less than three weeks after the tour resumed, two students (Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold) at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado killed thirteen people, and then took their own lives; early media reports declared them fans of "violent" music and video games. Substantial attention was directed at the frontman. On April 28, out of respect for the victims, the band canceled the remaining dates of the tour, and would not reappear in Denver until the 2001 Ozzfest.
Holy Wood (2000–2002)[edit]
The latter half of 1999 and much of 2000 was a period of relative silence for Marilyn Manson. The band spent over a year quietly writing and recording in a studio in Death Valley, with only the single Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes — an outtake from Antichrist Superstar[32] — appearing during that time. On November 14, 2000, Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was released. Returning to the darker, more abrasive sound of Antichrist Superstar, much of the album's content was written in response to the Columbine massacre. The album's third single, "The Nobodies", was directly inspired by the shootings.




"Disposable Teens"







Album version, as it appeared on Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

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Described by the band as the third part of the trilogy begun with Antichrist Superstar and continued in Mechanical Animals, its overarching theme is an exploration of the relationship between death and fame in American culture, and its lyrics and artwork contain many references to John F. Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald, John Lennon and Mark David Chapman, and even Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth. The international "Guns, God and Government Tour" expanded upon the exploration of America's fascination with violence, and with the tour's logo – a rifle and handguns arranged to resemble the Christian cross — Manson made no attempt to conceal what he saw as the source of that fascination.
The band also revealed that within Marilyn Manson's massive concept album trilogy,[33] Holy Wood serves as prequel to Mechanical Animals and Antichrist Superstar despite the latter two preceding Holy Wood in release date.[34][35] Each of the three albums contain its own storyline distinct from one other but also linked together abstractly in a fourth larger overarching storyline encompassing all three.[35] Manson has offered this much in the way of an interpretation: "[Holy Wood is about] wanting to fit into a world that didn't want me, and fighting really hard to get there. [The album's deepest elements] are idealism and the desire to start a revolution. If you begin with Holy Wood, then Mechanical Animals really talks about how that revolution gets taken away from you and turned into a product, and then Antichrist Superstar is where you're given a choice to decide if you're going to be controlled by the power that you created or if you want to destroy yourself and then start over. It just becomes a cycle."[34]
On May 16, 2001, Manson announced on the band website that he planned to quote the Bible at his next concert, to "balance out" his violent lyrics, "so we can examine the virtues of wonderful Christian stories of disease, murder, adultery, suicide and child sacrifice. Now that seems like entertainment to me".[36][37] On June 21, 2001, Manson did indeed read from the Bible onstage in Denver, Colorado, presenting such passages as Leviticus 20:9 ("For every one that curseth his father or his mother shall surely be put to death") and Psalm 137:9 ("Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones").
This tour was documented in a DVD release of the same name, released October 29, 2002 and described by Manson as "This will help you see what it's like to be nailed to this wrecking ball" on the DVD packaging.[38][39] In addition to a compilation style concert from the tour [songs from multiple individual shows edited to appear as single performance], the DVD includes a short thirty minute film titled "Death Parade" in the style of an All Access Pass for the tour.[39]
Seven years later it was followed by Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. Released in Blu-ray on November 17, 2009, it depicts the sixteen song set of the Los Angeles performance in its entirety.[40][41]
The Golden Age of Grotesque and "farewell" (2003–2005)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Ozzfest in 2003.
With the "triptych" of the previous three albums now complete, Marilyn Manson was free to begin a fresh project. In 2002, Jonathan Davis of Korn invited Marilyn Manson into a studio to record vocals on a track he wrote titled "Redeemer". The song, produced by both Jon and Richard Gibbs, was then released on the Queen of the Damned soundtrack. After finding inspiration in the decadent Swing era of the 1920s, the band recorded The Golden Age of Grotesque that year and the album was released on May 13, 2003.





"mOBSCENE"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque

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Eschewing the lyrical depth and volume of symbolism and hidden meaning of Holy Wood, the new album was relatively straightforward; in an extended metaphor, Manson compares his own often-criticized music to the entartete Kunst banned by the Nazi regime. New member Tim Skold, replacing Twiggy Ramirez, added a new dimension to the band's sound; he brought with him from KMFDM that band's use of heavy industrial beats—The Golden Age of Grotesque was frequently impugned[by whom?] as derivative of KMFDM and lacking the originality that Marilyn Manson had become known for.[42][43] The album debuted at No. 1 on the album charts, selling over 118,000 copies in the US its first week of release.[44] It won a 2003 Metal Edge Readers' Choice Award for "Album of the Year".[45]
Another world tour, the "Grotesk Burlesk Tour", followed, which furthered the album's Weimar Republic-inspired theme by adding elements of German Kabarett to the group's performances. Elaborate artwork by Gottfried Helnwein appeared in the band's stage dressing, and the members began appearing both on-stage and off- in designer suits and with fashion superstars.
Lest We Forget: The Best Of was released on September 28, 2004. It was referred to by Manson as his "farewell" album[46] when earlier that month, coinciding with Trent Reznor leaving New Orleans for the west coast, the Nine Inch Nails website officially announced "nothing studios: 1994–2004", suggesting that Nothing Studios was closed. This later proved to be the end of the associated vanity record label, as well as Manson's business association (effectively then shifting the band to a full Interscope contract) when Reznor successfully sued co-founder John Malm for fraud and breach of fiduciary duty (amongst others). Lest We Forget was supported by a series of "greatest hits" performances, the "Against All Gods Tour". After the release of the single "Personal Jesus", the band made a number of promotional appearances including a performance on MADtv;[47] at one of these, the Comet awards show in Germany, drummer Ginger Fish fell from his drum riser, fracturing his skull and wrist.[48] Former Nine Inch Nails drummer Chris Vrenna replaced him; after recovering from the accident Fish had been recording and performing with a new band, Martyr Plot, before rejoining Marilyn Manson.
John 5 had also been replaced; Mark Chaussee of Fight took over lead guitar on the "Against All Gods Tour", and was subsequently replaced in the studio by Tim Skold. Though John 5 denied any hostility towards Marilyn Manson following the announcement of his departure, at the band's appearance on the Rock am Ring music festival in 2003 an incident took place between John 5 and Marilyn Manson where Manson kicked and then shoved the guitarist. John 5 responded with anger, throwing off his guitar mid-song and raising his fists to Manson, before resuming the song. Lest We Forget was certified Gold in 2005.[49]
The Interscope years[edit]
Eat Me, Drink Me (2006–2008)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing "The Nobodies" in Florence, Italy during the "Rape of the World Tour".
Beginning in January 2006, and continuing for some months, Marilyn Manson's official website was updated several times, adding new artwork and music, and making obtuse references to The Celebritarian Corporation, an art movement led by the frontman. Merchandise has since become available featuring logos such as the "double cross" (a variation on the Cross of Lorraine), as well as the slogans "we will sell our shadow to those who stand within it" and "do not seek death; seek destruction".




"If I Was Your Vampire"







Album version, as it appeared on Eat Me, Drink Me

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Marilyn Manson's sixth studio album, Eat Me, Drink Me, was released on June 5, 2007, debuting at number 8 in the United States with more than 88,000 copies sold.[9] Released more than four years after The Golden Age of Grotesque, Eat Me, Drink Me marked another change in musical styles that the band has become famous for – opting for a more introspective direction. One remarkable note of the album is that it was written entirely by Manson and Skold in a rented home studio. The album is also the first major label Manson album without Madonna Wayne Gacy (Pogo) as a listed member, making lead singer Marilyn Manson the only original member since Portrait of an American Family. Chris Vrenna, who temporarily replaced Ginger Fish on drums during the Against All Gods Tour, replaced Pogo to become the band's full-time keyboardist. Marilyn Manson co-headlined a tour with Slayer in order to promote the album with Bleeding Through as the opening act and Deadly Apples on select dates.
Rumors also circulated for some time that Marilyn Manson wrote the song "Mutilation Is the Most Sincere Form of Flattery" as an attack on the band My Chemical Romance. He later denied this, stating that it was aimed at people in general who sought to imitate him. In another interview Manson stated that "I'm embarrassed to be me because these people are doing a really sad, pitiful, shallow version of what I've done".[50] In response to this, Gerard Way, the lead singer of My Chemical Romance claimed nothing Manson could say would bring the band down.
On January 9, 2008 Marilyn Manson posted a bulletin on MySpace confirming that former bassist Twiggy Ramirez had rejoined the band, resulting in the exit of Tim Skold. Skold and Manson had apparently began writing new material before the personnel change. Future collaborations with Skold were not ruled out.[51][52][53]
The High End of Low (2008–2009)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Quart Festival in 2009.
The band's seventh full-length studio album began recording sessions following the conclusion of their "Rape of the World Tour" on March 2, 2008.[54] The actual recording took place at Manson's Hollywood Hills home between November 2008 and January 5, 2009. The last song, called "15", was completed on the evening of Manson's Jan 5 birthday—hence the name.[55]
Manson said, "after my greatest hits album (Lest We Forget: The Best Of) came out I took a long break from music because it was a period where I was not sure who I wanted to be. I left music for a while but that's not an error I want to repeat in the future." He mentioned Kerry King, James Iha former guitarist of The Smashing Pumpkins, and Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs as likely contributors.[56] During an exclusive interview titled Everyone Will Suffer Now at the now-defunct fansite MansonUSA on January 11, 2008, Manson shared, "I just feel like there is a big change happening now. It's going to be the one. Eat Me, Drink Me is opening the window and this is going to be the Hurricane Katrina."[57] Since parting company with Skold and reuniting with Ramirez, the band had occupied themselves with work on the album to achieve their target of a February 2009 release. It was soon followed by the announcement of new tour dates. In an interview with Steppin' Out, Manson described the then-nascent record as, "very ruthless, very heavy, and very violent".[56]
On August 14, 2008, Manson announced at a public interview in Seoul, Korea that former Limp Bizkit guitarist and current Black Light Burns frontman Wes Borland had joined the lineup, replacing Rob Holliday on guitars. The band attended the ETP Festival and were wrapping up production on the new album. However, Borland left a few months later to reunite with Limp Bizkit for the third time. Borland told UK's Kerrang Magazine that he quit after seeing none of the nine songs he wrote for the record make the final cut, and was extremely dissatisfied at the thought of being just a hired gun.[58]
On October 5, the band played a special show at the annual Hot Topic managers meeting. The show took place at the Los Angeles International Airport's Marriott Hotel. During an after party for the 2008 Scream Awards, Manson was overheard comparing the new album to Antichrist Superstar and stating the album was "pretty much finished." In an interview on the February 2009 issue of Revolver Magazine, he revealed the title of two songs, namely, "I Wanna Kill You Like They Do in the Movies" and "Armagoddamnmotherfuckinggeddon". The album's producer Sean Beavan, later posted a Myspace blog revealing two more song titles, "15" and "Four Rusted Horses".
A statement was released by Manson on Christmas Eve in order to dispel rumors that had been circulating regarding his relationship with Evan Rachel Wood and a speculated collaboration with rapper Ne-Yo.[59] On January 12, a new song title was divulged by Rudy Coby, a collaborator and friend of the frontman. The song is called "Devour" and was said to be the album's first track.
Marilyn Manson joined Slayer as headliners for the Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival tour in 2009. The press release for the tour stated that "Manson is currently in the studio working on his seventh studio album scheduled for release May 18th on Interscope Records." On February 2, Rolling Stone confirmed the album had been officially titled The High End of Low.
On March 18, 2009, Kerrang! reported that the album contained a total of 15 tracks and that the final song is called "15". They also revealed another new song entitled "We're from America". Manson opined on the latter song, "I think a lot of people will hear the track and initially think it's just political, but it's not just that, it's also me describing a lot of fucked-up scenarios that I'm going through in my personal life. Someone asked me, 'Why are you so fucked up?', 'Well, I am from America.' I hate the fact that so many people have fucked the country up, and so many people fucked up my personal life and I allowed it to happen. So in a way, I feel like America as a whole feels, but in no way does that make me a tree-hugging patriotic freedom rocker." The track was released exclusively on the band's official website as a free download on March 27, 2009. On April 7, it became available for purchase as a digital single.
The album's official first single, "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon," arrived in radio stations on April 21. It peaked at number 37 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Chart.[60] On April 16, 2009, marilynmanson.com was updated with a new splash page featuring the projected album artwork as well as the track listing for The High End of Low. The record was released on May 26, 2009. It debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with 49,000 copies sold.[10] Despite reaching a higher charting position than Manson's prior studio effort Eat Me, Drink Me, which debuted at number 8,[9] it arrived with the lowest opening week sum of any of Manson's albums since The Last Tour on Earth opened with sales of 26,000 units in 1999.
After much fan speculation and no official announcement, Andy Gerold joined Marilyn Manson in the capacity of live bassist for "The High End of Low Tour" after former bassist Twiggy Ramirez switched to lead guitar duties. Gerold played his first show with the band on June 3, 2009, in Brno, Czech Republic. As of 2011, Gerold is still the youngest musician to play in the band, preceding former drummer Sara Lee Lucas by nearly seven years. During the summer of 2009, the band co-headlined the 2009 Mayhem Festival with Slayer.[61] Later in October 2009, the band headlined the internationally advertised visual kei event, V-Rock Music festival.[62]
The Cooking Vinyl years[edit]
Born Villain (2009–2013)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing during the Twins Of Evil Tour in 2012.
The eighth studio album by Marilyn Manson entered the writing phase during "The High End of Low Tour" in 2009.[63] Bassist Twiggy projected a release date of 2011 through Cooking Vinyl Records and Marilyn Manson's own label Hell, etc.[64] It is the band's first album since allowing their contract with Interscope Records to expire back in late 2009. Marilyn Manson attested that the lyrical content of the album will be "more romantic" yet "self-abusive,"[63] and described the sonic elements of the record as "suicide death metal."[65]
The prospect of an eighth studio album by the band was first confirmed by the frontman himself during an interview with Metal Hammer on December 3, 2009.[63] He elaborated, "We've just been released from our record contract with Interscope so I think a lot of the creative control on which my hands were tied on a lot of choices—the music videos—things like that. And the first example is the newest video, they clearly wouldn't have allowed me to make that video. So we started writing new songs on the road—a bit like [David Bowie's album] Aladdin Sane—I think people can expect a new record a lot sooner than we [expected]."[63] According to Chris Vrenna, by January 2010, the band was already "talking and coming up with concepts" for the album.[66] On January 24, 2010, Manson confirmed on the band's official MySpace profile that "the new album is officially in motion."[67]
In April 2010, during his appearance at the Revolver Golden Gods Awards, Manson divulged that the band had recorded 13 songs, one of which failed to appear in a television series about vampires.[65] He referred to the album as "very death metal" and voiced interest in releasing the album differently from previous Marilyn Manson records.[65] He also indicated his friendship with Slayer as a vague influence on the record.[65] During an interview with Full Metal Jackie, he stated that the album was halfway finished.[68]
On May 7, 2010, both entertainer Rudy Coby and The Nachtkabarett's Nick Kushner were previewed material from the album, the latter described it on Facebook as "fuckin' hardcore." Elaborating on the band's musical direction, Manson commented on Twiggy being influenced by his touring experiences in 2009, particularly during the Rockstar Mayhem Festival. Manson's father, Hugh Warner, described the album,

It will make a vagina wet. What can you say after that? If the vagina's wet, all things are good. That's what he [Manson] told me when I was listening to it. It's very hard, very heavy, very good. Everyone should be extremely excited and happy.[69]
During an interview with Eric Blair on November 3, 2010, bassist Twiggy Ramirez indicated that the new album was "almost done. It'll probably be out next year. [...] It's our best record yet, I think. I mean, everyone always says that, but I think this is our best work so far... It's kind of like a little more of a punk rock Mechanical Animals without sounding too pretentious."[70]




"Overneath The Path Of Misery"







Album version, as it appeared on Born Villain

Problems playing this file? See media help.
For much of the early half of 2011, Marilyn Manson removed himself from the public spotlight and ceased almost all communication with his fans or the outside world.[71] On February 24, 2011, the band's longtime drummer Ginger Fish announced his resignation from the group, prompting a search for a replacement.[72] Meanwhile, on March 18, 2011, Marilyn Manson took a short break from his self-imposed sequestration by appearing in the music video for the song "Tempat Ku" by Brunei pop outfit D'Hask.[71] On March 23, 2011, he uploaded new pictures onto the band's Facebook page, in a different style of previous photos.[73] The new style suggested the 'new era' of Marilyn Manson had begun, further generating anticipation for the upcoming release.



 Unveiled on May 22, 2011, the new CMYK-styled logo is used by the band to signify the eighth studio album and their new era.[74][75]
On May 22, 2011, the band's website underwent a complete overhaul. A short 26 second snippet of a new song, tentatively titled, "I am among no one (excerpt from an undisclosed song with an unreleased title)"[74] was uploaded to the redesigned main page along with a new logo to signify their eight studio album and the new era. The logo consisted of the letter M repeated four times in a spiral pattern, each with one long tail. At the end of the long tail is the Chinese trigram ☲ (離 lí) of the I Ching. Read lengthwise or up-and-down, it formed Hexagram 30, "Radiance," also called "the clinging" and "the net". The origin of the character is rooted in symbols of long-tailed birds such as the peacock or the legendary phoenix. The CMYK coloring was also notable with regard to an acrostic formed by Manson, in a journal entry that accompanied the site changes, which spelled out the words "Christianity Manufactures Yesterdays Killers".[74][75]
On June 3, 2011 the Brazilian edition of the Portuguese broadsheet newspaper Destak confirmed that agents for the band had finalized negotiations for the group to tour in Brazil and other South American countries as part of the SWU Music & Arts Festival beginning on the second week of November 2011.[76] The Brazilian music festival also saw a change in venue for 2011.[76] While organizers have yet to finalize details, it was speculated that the event may be held at the São Paulo municipality of Paulínia.[76] Manson appeared live via the Ustream broadcast of Fleischer's Universe on June 21, 2011, where he announced that the new album title will be revealed within a week. He also divulged the following lyrics, "The center of the universe cannot exist if there are no edges", of a yet to be released song.[77] The album title was not, in fact, revealed within a week, but was announced on September 1 as Born Villain via Twitter.
After being impressed by his directorial work on one of Kid Cudi's music videos, Marilyn Manson employed the actor Shia LaBeouf to work on the album artwork as well as create a "making-of" video documenting the album's recording and production.[78][79][80]
On November 22, 2011, it was announced that Chris Vrenna had officially left the band after contributing to the writing and production of Born Villain.[81]
On May 1, 2012, Born Villain was released worldwide. It debuted at No. 10 on the Billboard 200, No. 3 on Top 100 Rock albums, and No. 1 on both Top Independent Albums and Hard Rock Albums.
Two months prior to release, the band begun to support the album with the Hey Cruel World... Tour and joint concerts with Rob Zombie and Alice Cooper on the Twins of Evil Tour and Masters of Madness Tour.[82][83]
The Pale Emperor (2013-present)[edit]
Marilyn Manson started production for his ninth studio album in 2013. In early 2014, Gil Sharone of Stolen Babies revealed he had been working on the new album since November.[84][85] A new song, titled "Cupid Carries a Gun", was used as the opening theme to the television series Salem. The song was composed alongside music producer Tyler Bates,[86] and had been described by Manson as "the last track we finished for my new album",[87] indicating that production for his next studio album had been completed. On June 25, Fred Sablan confirmed he had left the band on good terms, and was replaced on bass guitar by Twiggy for their summer tour.[88] Bates and Paul Wiley took over as the band's live guitarists.[89][90]
The band's scheduled performance at the Park Live Festival in Moscow on June 27 was cancelled by the event's organisers moments before the band was due to arrive on stage. Authorities received numerous bomb threats, while hundreds of activists affiliated with the Russian Orthodox Church were seen protesting outside the venue. The incident culminated in the assault of several of the band's crew members outside their hotel.[91] Two days later, another performance in the Russian city of Novosibirsk was cancelled when authorities refused to allow the show to go ahead, accusing Manson of insulting the beliefs of the Orthodox church and of "promoting sadomasochism".[92]
On September 3, Manson confirmed that the new album is "prepared for landing".[93] A large portion of another new song, titled "Killing Strangers", was featured in the film John Wick, which was released in cinemas on October 24.[94][95] On October 26, "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" was premiered on BBC Radio 1's Rock Show by Daniel P. Carter. Immediately following the broadcast, the song was made available for free download on Manson's official site.[96] Manson garnered significant media attention when a video depicting the simulated rape of singer-songwriter Lana Del Rey was posted onto YouTube by production company Sturmgruppe.[97] The video, titled "Sturmgruppe 2013 Reel", appeared to show simulated footage of film director Eli Roth attacking Del Rey, which was interspersed with unrelated footage from two of the band's previous music videos — "No Reflection" and "Slo-Mo-Tion", both from their 2012 album Born Villain.[98][99][100] Manson's representatives later released a statement to Billboard, denying that he had any involvement in the production of the rape scenes.[101] The audio of "Deep Six" was released on the bands official YouTube account on December 15,[102] with the music video following four days later.[103]
The Pale Emperor was released in the US on January 20, 2015.
Controversy[edit]
In December 1996, a press conference was called by William J. Bennett, Senator Joseph Lieberman, and activist C. DeLores Tucker, aimed at MCA, the owner of Interscope Records. Calling several albums released by the label – including Antichrist Superstar — "profane", "violent", "filth", and "crap"[104][105] the group questioned MCA president Edgar Bronfman, Jr.'s ability to head the label competently while profiting from such material. That November 6, U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management and Restructuring held a public hearing on the effect of violent rock and rap lyrics on youths. Supporters of the band claim it was merely another salvo in Senator Lieberman's declared war on the band. The hearing, chaired by Representative Sam Brownback, featured the testimony of Lieberman and Tucker, and of Raymond Kuntz, of Burlington, North Dakota, who blamed his son's suicide on Antichrist Superstar, which Lieberman denounced as "vile, hateful, nihilistic and damaging."[105]
The band's performances have come under fire – the Dead to the World Tour, in particular, was followed by protesters at nearly every North American venue it visited. The band's March 10, 1997 performance in Columbia, South Carolina was canceled "in response to growing public pressure by religious, civic and political leaders who criticized the group's image".[106] The owner of Calgary's Max Bell Centre had Marilyn Manson's July 25 show canceled, citing "immorality" and the band's "use of animals on stage." Another concert in Portland was canceled a few days later due to Manson's reputation, and the venue's inability to get insurance for the show.[107]
The New Jersey date of Ozzfest '97, to be held at Giants Stadium, was canceled by the New Jersey Sports and Exhibition Authority, who cited Marilyn Manson's performance as its reason; the event was only held after Ozzy Osbourne himself successfully sued the state, which compelled the authorities to allow the concert. Legislation was introduced and passed in South Carolina and Utah allowing state-operated venues to ban groups like Marilyn Manson from performing and, in at least one instance, in Florida, local schools have gone so far as to threaten expulsion for students in attendance of Marilyn Manson concerts.[29]
School shootings[edit]
Columbine massacre[edit]



"I couldn't care less about those kids' reasoning. What reason do we have to go to war? It's all the same. Killing somebody can't be justified by having a reason. I think it says a lot about the [news] media that those two kids were on the cover of Time magazine twice because I'm sure that's everything they wanted. They wanted fame. America sold them the idea that an obituary is just another headline."
—Marilyn Manson on the Columbine massacre.[108]
Following the Columbine High School massacre, there were accusations that killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were influenced by Marilyn Manson's music. When later evidence was presented that neither Harris nor Klebold were fans of the band,[109] many were led to criticize the media for using the band as a scapegoat instead of analyzing the underlying societal problems surrounding the incident.[110] In the controversial documentary Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore interviewed Manson about the tragedy. When asked what he would say to the children of Columbine High and their community, Manson replied "I wouldn't say a single word to them; I would listen to what they have to say, and that's what no one did".[111][112] Manson also submitted an op-ed piece to Rolling Stone magazine [June 24, 1999] titled "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?",[113] which detailed his opinion on violence as an inherent cultural presence as well as discussing the shootings and his status as an easy target for blame in incidents of this kind. He also said that he expresses condolences to the victim's families. Rapper Eminem criticized the controversy in his song "The Way I Am", which contains the line, "When a dude's gettin' bullied and shoots up his school/And they blame it on Marilyn, and the heroin/Where were the parents at?". Marilyn Manson made a cameo in the video for the song, and even contributed vocals to a guitar-heavy remix.
Other shootings[edit]
The controversy connecting Marilyn Manson and American school shootings continued on October 10, 2007 when 14-year-old Asa Coon opened gunfire on his high school in Cleveland, Ohio. SuccessTech Academy went to lock-down status around 1:15 pm, when Coon shot four people; including two students, and two teachers, before turning the gun on himself. Police reports, and student interviews claim that Coon was wearing a Marilyn Manson T-shirt during the rampage. On several occasions, Coon told students and teachers that he did not believe in, nor respect God; instead worshipped the band's vocalist, Brian Warner. Coon was known for violent behavior, and stood out among the student body for his appearance—which included black boots, a black trench coat, black nail polish, and rock T-shirts.[114]
Musical style[edit]
The Marilyn Manson band has produced music in many genres throughout its career. The first stage shows and cassettes were gothic rock.[2] After getting signed to Nothing, their first album, Portrait of an American Family, was industrial metal. Their first hit single, the cover of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", was hard rock.[115] 1996's Antichrist Superstar was balanced between industrial rock, progressive metal, gothic rock and shock metal.[116] In 1998 for Mechanical Animals, the band shifted gears to create a rock opera in the style of glam rock. This was reversed in 2000 with Holy Wood‍ '​s return to industrial metal and heavy goth rock.[115] 2003's The Golden Age of Grotesque added an electronic aspect to the industrial metal, but 2007's Eat Me, Drink Me showed a relatively cleaner arena rock production style.[117][118] 2009's predictable The High End of Low[119] and 2012's energetic Born Villain were both industrial metal. 2015's The Pale Emperor introduced a blues rock aspect to the hard rock and industrial metal.[120]
Influences[edit]
Initially, after being introduced to Big Black's album Songs About Fucking by a fellow Miami clubgoer, who would become his keyboard player, Madonna Wayne Gacy, Manson had the desire to form a rock band that used a drum machine — an uncommon technique outside of dance music at the time.[6] The earliest incarnations of Marilyn Manson used this setup, and produced experimental, drum-heavy compositions similar to Steve Albini's work with Big Black; later, with the addition of a live drummer, the band's composing process, recording techniques, and live performances were by necessity altered. Guitarist Daisy Berkowitz and bassist Gidget Gein, who came from punk rock backgrounds, brought the musicianship and songwriting style of the Jim Carroll Band (whose "People Who Died" was an early favorite cover for Marilyn Manson) and the showmanship of The New York Dolls to the mixture. After the band spent some time at Nothing, their sound gathered sonic elements from other bands on that label's roster, like Nine Inch Nails and Prick.
Evidently, Manson himself is heavily influenced by the shock rock stylings of such artists as Arthur Brown, Alice Cooper, The Doors, Black Sabbath, Kiss and some of Iggy Pop as a young music fan;[6] however, later influences have come from the glam rock of David Bowie (who Manson claims is his biggest influence), whose chameleon-like ability to shift from one style to another, replete with a new look and musical philosophy, was a characteristic which would also be frequently ascribed to Marilyn Manson by the music press.[121] Such an influence is exemplified in the similarities between the music videos of Bowie's "The Hearts Filthy Lesson" and many of Manson's videos, such as "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" (Floria Sigismondi has directed music videos for both Bowie ("Little Wonder") and Manson ("The Beautiful People" and "Tourniquet").) He also became later fond of The Cure and Bauhaus around the Eat Me, Drink Me period. The hard rock background of John 5 amplified this aspect of the band's sound in live performances; Tim Skold, a former guitarist, bassist, and vocalist in Shotgun Messiah, later blended in that band's mixture of industrial drums and guitars. Influence on the electronic sound of the band has likely came from bands and artists such as Depeche Mode and Gary Numan, the latter of which switched from a synthpop style to more a darker more industrial rock sound which Manson's band performs within. Both Manson and musical associate Trent Reznor who play in this industrial style are likely influenced by Numan as Manson has been quoted with saying "I was always into his apocalyptic fiction lyrics. He pioneered electronic dance music." Whilst Reznor has said "After hearing 'Cars' I knew I wanted to make music with synthesizers. The Pleasure Principle and Telekon are fucking great because they're so cold sounding. Numan's early albums painted an emotional place that wasn't pleasant to be at. It seemed like creepy science fiction in an unpleasant way." Manson's first official recorded cover was "Down in the Park" and Reznor has performed with Numan himself.
Both Manson and Twiggy Ramirez have mentioned the influence of Queen on their more melodic work, particularly on Mechanical Animals and Eat Me, Drink Me, the latter of which Twiggy did not participate in.
Band members[edit]
Main article: List of Marilyn Manson band members
Many members have contributed performances (either live or in-studio) on instruments other than their primary ones. For instance, Ramirez has played guitar on several records while his live instrument is bass, Gacy ("Pogo") has played keyboards, theremin and calliope, Manson has played pan flute, harpsichord, keyboards, and guitar, and Berkowitz has been credited with bass guitar and drum machines. Vrenna filled in on drums for Fish when he was injured, and later replaced Gacy on keyboards.
Current membersMarilyn Manson – lead vocals, tambourine, saxophone, pan flute (1989–present)
Paul Wiley – lead guitar (2015–present ; also some shows in 2014), rhythm guitar (2014–2015) programming, backing vocals (2014–present)
Twiggy Ramirez – bass, guitars, keyboards, backing vocals (1993–2002, 2008–present)
Gil Sharone – drums (2014–present)
 Former membersZsa Zsa Speck – keyboards (1989–1990)
Olivia Newton Bundy – bass (1989–1990)
Gidget Gein – bass (1990–1993)
Sara Lee Lucas – drums (1990–1995)
Daisy Berkowitz – guitar (1989–1996)
Zim Zum – guitar (1996–1998)
John 5 – guitars (1998–2004)
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, percussions, programming (1990–2007)
Tim Sköld – guitars, keyboards, basses, backing vocals (2002–2008)
Ginger Fish – drums (1995–2011)
Chris Vrenna – keyboards, percussions, programming (2007–2011)
Fred Sablan – bass (2010–2014)
Tyler Bates – guitar, backing vocals (2014–2015)
Former touring membersChris Vrenna – drums (2004–2005)
Mark Chaussee – guitar, bass (2004–2005)
Rob Holliday – guitar, bass, backing vocals (2007–2008)
Wes Borland – guitar (2008–2009)
Andy Gerold – bass, guitar (2009–2010)
Jason Sutter – drums (2012–2014)
Spencer Rollins – keyboards, guitar (2013)

Discography[edit]
Main article: Marilyn Manson (band) discography
Studio albumsPortrait of an American Family (1994)
Antichrist Superstar (1996)
Mechanical Animals (1998)
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000)
The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003)
Eat Me, Drink Me (2007)
The High End of Low (2009)
Born Villain (2012)
The Pale Emperor (2015)
Awards[edit]
Billboard Music Video Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1998 "The Dope Show"[122] Best Clip (Hard Rock/Metal) Won
Maximum Vision Award Won
Grammy Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Hard Rock Performance Nominated
2001 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2004 "mOBSCENE" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2013 "No Reflection" Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Nominated
MTV Video Music Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1996 "Sweet Dreams" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
1997 "The Beautiful People" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
Best Special Effects in a Video Nominated
Best Art Direction in a Video Nominated
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Cinematography in a Video Won
Miscellaneous awards and honors[edit]

Year
Nominated work
Award/honor
Nominator

1992 Marilyn Manson Best Heavy Metal Band New Times Magazine
1992 Marilyn Manson Best Hard Alternative Band South Florida Slammies
Band of the Year South Florida Slammies
1996 Marilyn Manson Band of the Year South Florida Slammies
1997 Marilyn Manson Best New Artist Rolling Stone
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Video of the Year Rolling Stone
2012 Born Villain Rock Album of the Year Loudwire
2012 "No Reflection" Rock Video of the Year Loudwire
2015[123] Marilyn Manson Lifetime achievement award Kerrang

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47.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Personal Jesus MAD TV Live Performance Video". Vodpod.com. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
48.Jump up ^ "Manson's Drummer Injured In Fall". Billboard. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
49.Jump up ^ "MARILYN MANSON: 'Lest We Forget' Certified Gold – November 12, 2005". Roadrunnerrecords.com. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
50.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson slams My Chemical Romance 'sad and pitiful'". NME. 2007-06-05. Retrieved 2008-01-27.
51.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson | The Official Web Site[dead link]
52.Jump up ^ Rolling Stone : Marilyn Manson Bringing Twiggy Songs, Satan, “One Giant Evil Cocktail” On Tour[dead link]
53.Jump up ^ Rolling Stone : Marilyn Manson Says Led Zeppelin Is Responsible For Reunion With Twiggy[dead link]
54.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Front Row King. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
55.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: The High End of Low". SuicideGirls.com. 2009-06-10. Retrieved 2009-06-10.
56.^ Jump up to: a b Kerrang! Magazine Manson: "New album is very violent", Kerrang! Magazine, May 23, 2008
57.Jump up ^ "Everyone Will Suffer Now (archived by MansonWiki.com)". MansonUSA (now defunct). 2008-01-12. Retrieved 2010-11-01.
58.Jump up ^ "FMQB: QuickHits 8-15-08". Retrieved 2008-08-16.
59.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Is Not Working With Ne-Yo, Spokesperson Insists". VH1. 2008-12-03. Retrieved 2011-05-24.
60.Jump up ^ "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon release and Billboard charting". PR Newswire. 2009-03-23. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
61.Jump up ^ "SLAYER & MARILYN MANSON to headline Mayhem Fest 2009 – Full Lineup and Itinerary". Metalinjection.net. 2009-01-27. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
62.Jump up ^ "Versailles get dolled up for visual-kei fest | The Japan Times Online". Japan Times. 2009-10-23. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
63.^ Jump up to: a b c d Gill, James (2009-03-12). "Marilyn Manson: "I'm Back With Evan Rachel Wood"". Metal Hammer. Future Publishing. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
64.Jump up ^ "New Marilyn Manson Album Out in 2011". SMNNews. 2010-11-09. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
65.^ Jump up to: a b c d Peterson, Marta (2010-08-04). "Marilyn Manson at Revolver Golden Gods Awards Interview". Revolver TV. Future US. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
66.Jump up ^ Shlosman, Rafi (2010-01-12). "Interview with Chris Vrenna (NIN / Marilyn Manson)". Vampirefreaks.com. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
67.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2009-09-23). [Archived 23 September 2009 at WebCite "Marilyn Manson on MySpace Music"]. Myspace Music. News Corporation. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
68.Jump up ^ "Revolver Golden Gods Marilyn Manson Interview". Retrieved 2011-09-14.
69.Jump up ^ Aaron & Jen (2010-08-15). "The Apple Does Not Fall Far...(Interview with Hugh Warner)". MansonWiki. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
70.Jump up ^ Blair, Eric (2010-11-03). "Marilyn Manson Bassist Says Upcoming Album Is 'Our Best Record Yet'". Blabbermouth.net. Borivoj Krgin. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
71.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson stars in My Chemical Romance-esque pop video". Kerrang!. Bauer Media Group. 2011-03-18. Retrieved 2011-06-04.
72.Jump up ^ "Ginger Fish Announces Resignation". Twitlonger.com. 2011-02-24. Retrieved 2011-02-24.
73.Jump up ^ Wall Photos | Facebook—Manson's Facebook reveals new photos of the new era. Access date: March 23, 2011.
74.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson previews eighth studio album online". NME. IPC Media. 2011-05-23. Retrieved 2011-06-11.
75.^ Jump up to: a b Manson, Marilyn (2011-05-22). "Rapeture". Marilynmanson.com. Marilyn Manson. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
76.^ Jump up to: a b c Flesch, José Norberto (2011-06-03). "Marilyn Manson comes to Brazil in November". Destak. Cofina. Retrieved 2011-06-08.
77.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2011-06-21). Marilyn Manson interview on Fleischer's Universe. Interview with Charles Fleischer. John Ham. Ustream.tv. Los Angeles.
78.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson recruits Shia LaBeouf to document new album". Kerrang!. Bauer Media Group. 2011-07-01. Retrieved 2011-07-01.
79.Jump up ^ Barshad, Amos (2011-07-01). "Shia LaBeouf Told Regis and Kelly He's Working With Marilyn Manson". New York. Retrieved 2011-07-01.
80.Jump up ^ "Transformers star Shia LaBeouf set to shoot new Marilyn Manson documentary". NME. IPC Media. 2011-07-01. Retrieved 2011-07-02.
81.Jump up ^ "Chris Vrenna Leaves Marilyn Manson to Focus on New Projects". Type 3 Media. 2011-11-23.
82.Jump up ^ "Masters of Madness Tour w/Alice Cooper". Marilyn Manson. 2014-03-27. Retrieved 2014-04-19.
83.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Officially Announces Joint Tour With Alice Cooper". Loudwire.com. 2013-03-08. Retrieved 2014-04-19.
84.Jump up ^ "Twitter / GilSharone: That session I've been waiting ...". February 7, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
85.Jump up ^ "Video by gilsharone". November 26, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
86.Jump up ^ "New Marilyn Manson song to soundtrack TV series Salem". NME. April 25, 2014. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
87.Jump up ^ "WGN America's 'Salem' Enlists Marilyn Manson for Opening Titles (Video)". The Hollywood Reporter. April 24, 2014. Retrieved April 27, 2014. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
88.Jump up ^ "Twitter / Fredsablan: Lots of love for my brother ...". June 25, 2014. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
89.Jump up ^ "'Guardians of the Galaxy' Composer Tyler Bates Receives Bomb Threats". 2paragraphs. August 13, 2014. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
90.Jump up ^ "Tyler Bates completes his first European tour with Marilyn Manson". TylerBates.com. August 18, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
91.Jump up ^ "MARILYN MANSON: Bomb Threats And Protests Force Cancelation Of Two Shows in Russia". Blabbermouth.net. June 27, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
92.Jump up ^ "Authorities not allowing Marilyn Manson concert to go ahead as hundreds of religious activists protest". SBS Australia. June 28, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
93.Jump up ^ Carter, Emily (September 3, 2014). "Marilyn Manson says new album is "prepared for landing"". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group). Retrieved September 4, 2014.
94.Jump up ^ "'John Wick' to Feature Music by Tyler Bates & Joel Richard". filmmusicreporter.com. July 11, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
95.Jump up ^ "John Wick (2014)". Soundtracks.net. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
96.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Premieres New Song, "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge"". Revolver. October 26, 2014. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
97.Jump up ^ Khomami, Nadia (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson denies involvement in Lana Del Rey 'rape' video". NME. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
98.Jump up ^ Michaels, Sean (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson denies involvement in Lana Del Rey rape horror video". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
99.Jump up ^ Denham, Jess (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson denies involvement in shocking leaked footage from Lana Del Rey rape video". The Independent. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
100.Jump up ^ Gordon, Jeremy (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson Denies Involvement in Lana Del Rey Sexual Assault Depiction Footage". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
101.Jump up ^ Warner, Denise (November 20, 2014). "Marilyn Manson's Camp on Lana Del Rey Footage: We Had Nothing to Do With This Video". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
102.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Deep Six (Official Audio)". YouTube. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
103.Jump up ^ Grow, Kory (December 19, 2014). "See Marilyn Manson's Unsettling, Phallic 'Deep Six' Video". Rolling Stone. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
104.Jump up ^ Phillips, Chuck (1996-12-10). "Critics expected to take on MCA for explicit rap lyrics". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-05-10.
105.^ Jump up to: a b Manson the blame of suicide 11/6/97 while apparently listening to The Reflecting God
106.Jump up ^ Paula O' Keefe, "The History of Marilyn Manson, 1997 Update Part 1 of 2", at Spookhouse.net. Retrieved September 9, 2006.
107.Jump up ^ Paula O' Keefe, "The History of Marilyn Manson, 1997 Update Part 2 of 2", at Spookhouse.net. Retrieved September 9, 2006.
108.Jump up ^ Kessler, Ted (2000-09-09). "Marilyn Manson Goes Ape". NME (IPC Media): 28–31.
109.Jump up ^ Greg, Glasgow (1999-04-23). "Marilyn Manson Concert Canceled" (BROADSHEET). The Daily Camera (Albert J. Manzi). MediaNews Group. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
110.Jump up ^ Cullen, Dave. Inside the Columbine High investigation. Salon News, September 23, 1999.
111.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson in Bowling for Columbine
112.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Interview on Bowling for Columbine". Bowling for Columbine Official Website. 2002-10-11. Retrieved 2010-11-15.
113.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (OP-ED) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
114.Jump up ^ School Shooting[dead link]
115.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Biography". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on February 21, 2009. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
116.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
117.Jump up ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Marilyn Manson – Eat Me, Drink Me". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
118.Jump up ^ Ed Thompson (2007-06-04). "Eat Me Drink Me review at IGN Music". Uk.music.ign.com. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
119.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson at NME". NME. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
120.Jump up ^ Thomas, Fred. "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
121.Jump up ^ Ankeny, Jason. Marilyn Manson. Allmusic. Retrieved December 1, 2005.
122.Jump up ^ "This Day in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. November 6, 2007. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
123.Jump up ^ http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-marilyn-manson-kerrang-lifetime-achievement-award-20150612-story.html
Literature[edit]
Danesi, Marcel (2008). Popular Culture: Introductory Perspectives. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 074255547X.
External links[edit]
 Wikimedia Commons has media related to Marilyn Manson.
Official website
Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids website
http://www.mansonwiki.com/ - The Official Marilyn Manson Encyclopedia.


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Marilyn Manson (band)

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This article is about the band. For the person, see Marilyn Manson.

Marilyn Manson
Marilyn Manson Live in Moscow 2012.JPG
Marilyn Manson performing in 2012.

Background information

Origin
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States
Genres
Industrial rock[1] ·
 industrial metal ·
 hard rock[2] ·
 gothic rock ·
 alternative metal[3]
 
Years active
1989-present
Labels
Hell, etc., Cooking Vinyl,[4][5] Nothing, Interscope
Associated acts
Nine Inch Nails, Satan on Fire, Jack off Jill, Rob Zombie, Alice Cooper, Rammstein, Slayer, Slipknot, Godhead, The Prodigy, Danzig, Korn, Monster Magnet, Rasputina
Website
www.marilynmanson.com


Members
Marilyn Manson
Twiggy Ramirez
 Paul Wiley
Gil Sharone


Past members
Daisy Berkowitz
Olivia Newton Bundy
Zsa Zsa Speck
Madonna Wayne Gacy
Gidget Gein
Sara Lee Lucas
Ginger Fish
Zim Zum
John 5
Tim Sköld
Chris Vrenna
Fred Sablan
Tyler Bates
Marilyn Manson is an American rock band from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Formed in 1989 by frontman Marilyn Manson and Daisy Berkowitz, the group was originally named Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids with their theatrical performances gathering a local cult following in the early 1990s. The band's lineup has changed between many of their album releases; the current members of Marilyn Manson are the eponymous lead singer (the only remaining original member), bassist Twiggy Ramirez and drummer Gil Sharone.
Until 1996, the name of each member was originally created by combining the first name of an iconic female sex symbol and the last name of an iconic serial killer (e.g., Marilyn Monroe and Charles Manson).[6][7] The members of the band dress in outlandish makeup and costumes, and have engaged in intentionally shocking behavior both onstage and off. In the past, their lyrics often received criticism for their anti-religious sentiment and references to sex, violence and drugs. Their performances have frequently been called offensive and obscene, and, on several occasions, protests and petitions have led to the group being banned from performing.
As this controversy began to wane throughout the 2000s, so did the band's mainstream popularity. Despite this, Jon Wiederhorn of MTV.com, in June 2003, referred to Marilyn Manson as "the only true artist today".[8] Marilyn Manson has garnered much success: in the US, three of the band's albums have been certified platinum while three more were certified gold, and the band has seen eight of its releases debut in the top ten,[9][10] including two number-one albums. VH1 has ranked Marilyn Manson as the seventy-eighth best rock band on their 100 Great Artists of Hard Rock.[11] Aggregate site AcclaimedMusic.net lists Marilyn Manson number 714 in their artist rank for greatest of all time.[12] Marilyn Manson has sold over 50 million records.[13][14][15][16][17]


Contents  [hide]
1 Band history 1.1 Origins 1.1.1 The Spooky Kids (1989–1992)
1.2 The Nothing years 1.2.1 Portrait of an American Family and Smells Like Children (1993–1995)
1.2.2 Antichrist Superstar (1996–1997)
1.2.3 Mechanical Animals (1998–1999)
1.2.4 Holy Wood (2000–2002)
1.2.5 The Golden Age of Grotesque and "farewell" (2003–2005)
1.3 The Interscope years 1.3.1 Eat Me, Drink Me (2006–2008)
1.3.2 The High End of Low (2008–2009)
1.4 The Cooking Vinyl years 1.4.1 Born Villain (2009–2013)
1.4.2 The Pale Emperor (2013-present)

2 Controversy 2.1 School shootings 2.1.1 Columbine massacre
2.1.2 Other shootings

3 Musical style 3.1 Influences
4 Band members
5 Discography
6 Awards 6.1 Billboard Music Video Awards
6.2 Grammy Awards
6.3 MTV Video Music Awards
6.4 Miscellaneous awards and honors
7 References 7.1 Literature
8 External links

Band history[edit]
Origins[edit]
The Spooky Kids (1989–1992)[edit]



 A 1992 flyer for a Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids show, with artwork by Marilyn Manson. It parodies Baphomet.
In 1989, Brian Warner was a college student working toward a journalism degree, and gaining experience in the field by writing music articles for a South Florida lifestyle magazine, 25th Parallel. He met Scott Putesky shortly afterward and, after showing him some lyrics and poems he had written, proposed that they form a band together.[18] Warner, guitarist Putesky, and bassist Brian Tutunick recorded their first demo tape as Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids in late 1989, taking on the stage names of Marilyn Manson, Daisy Berkowitz and Olivia Newton Bundy, respectively. They were soon joined by Stephen Bier, who called himself Madonna Wayne Gacy; Bundy was replaced by Gidget Gein, born Brad Stewart. In 1991, drummer Fred Streithorst joined the band, with the stage name Sara Lee Lucas.
The stage names used by each member were representative of a concept the band considered central: the dichotomy of good and evil, and the existence of both, together, in every whole. "Marilyn Monroe had a dark side", explained Manson in his autobiography, "just as Charles Manson has a good, intelligent side".[19] Images of both Monroe and Manson, as well as of others equally famous and notorious, were common in the band's early promotional materials.
The Spooky Kids' popularity in the area grew quickly, largely because of radio DJ Scott David of WYNX-FM, an early fan who eagerly played songs from the band's demo tapes on the air; and because of the band's highly visual concerts, which drew from performance art and used many shock techniques. It was not uncommon to see onstage "naked women nailed to a cross, a child in a cage, or bloody animal body parts";[20] Manson, Berkowitz, and Gein variously performed in women's clothing or bizarre costumes; and, for lack of a professional pyrotechnician, they would occasionally set their own stage props on fire. The band would dramatically contrast these grotesque theatrics with elements drawn from the culture of the members' youth in the 1970s and 1980s: characters from that era's children's television made regular, often somewhat altered, appearances on Marilyn Manson flyers and newsletters, and were frequently sampled in the music. They continued to perform and release cassettes—shortening their name to Marilyn Manson in 1992—until the summer of 1993, when the band drew the attention of Trent Reznor, who at the time had just founded his own record label, Nothing Records.[2]
The Nothing years[edit]
Portrait of an American Family and Smells Like Children (1993–1995)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Nothing Records' "A Night of Nothing" industry showcase.
Reznor offered Marilyn Manson a contract with his new label and the opportunity to support Nine Inch Nails on their upcoming headlining tour. The band accepted both offers, and recording sessions for its national debut, Portrait of an American Family, began in July 1993. Working with producer Roli Mosimann at Criteria Studios in Miami, Florida, the band recorded a selection of new songs along with material from their Spooky Kids repertoire and, by the end of Autumn 1993, had completed the first version of their debut, titled The Manson Family Album. However, it was not well received. The abrasive sonic "rawness" that Mosimann's production had brought to such groups as Swans had failed to materialize on The Manson Family Album; Reznor and all the band's members found it flat and lifeless, and poorly representative of Marilyn Manson's dynamic performances. "I thought, 'This really sucks', Manson explained, "so I played it for Trent, and he thought it sucked".[20] At the same time, the band was having difficulties with Gidget Gein, who had begun to lose control of his addiction to heroin. While reworking the album the band played two shows in South Florida under the name Mrs. Scabtree. Not much is known about the complete lineup, except that Manson performed on the drums, Gacy on keyboard, Berkowitz on guitar, and Jeordie White of Miami thrash band Amboog-a-Lard and Jessicka of Jack Off Jill sharing vocal duties. Four other local musicians, bassists Mark Dubin of Sister Venus and Patrick Joyce from The Itch, guitarist Miles Hie, and violinist Mary Karlzen, were also involved.[21][22]




Lunchbox







Album version, as it appeared on Portrait of an American Family

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Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)







Album version, as it appeared on Smells Like Children

Problems playing this file? See media help.
In October 1993, Reznor agreed to rework the production on Marilyn Manson's album, taking them and their tapes to The Record Plant in Los Angeles. Gein, who had been hospitalized after an overdose, was not invited. After seven weeks of mixing, remixing, and rerecording, the album — now titled Portrait of an American Family — was ready to be presented to Interscope Records. Even as the first single "Get Your Gunn" was beginning to receive radio airplay, Gein received a letter declaring his services "no longer needed" by the band after he overdosed on heroin for the fourth time; he was replaced by White, of Amboog-a-Lard,[23] who undertook the alias Twiggy Ramirez. In December 1993, Ramirez first performed as the band's new bass player on a week's worth of headline dates through Florida with Jack Off Jill opening. While playing Club 5 in Jacksonville, Florida Manson was accused by the town's Christian Coalition of violating the town's adult entertainment codes. Jack Off Jill singer Jessicka was accused of solicitation and offering to engage in lewdness. Both singers were arrested and charged with misdemeanors.[24] On the first date of a fourteen-week national tour opening for Nine Inch Nails, Ramirez made his national touring debut. It was during this tour that Manson had occasion to meet with Church of Satan founder Dr. Anton LaVey. After a cordial meeting, LaVey honored Manson with the title of "Reverend" — meaning, in the Church of Satan, a person who is revered by the church, and not necessarily one who dedicates his life to preaching the religion to others, as with a priest or minister. Manson would use this title in album liner notes, citing himself as "Reverend Marilyn Manson."
In March 1995, the band began its first national headlining tour, a two-month outing with Monster Voodoo Machine as support; this would be drummer Sara Lee Lucas' last tour with the band. Tension between Lucas and Manson had apparently grown as the tour wore on and, on the next-to-last night of the tour, Manson secretly decided to end the show with a flourish: during a performance of the then-current single, "Lunchbox", he doused Lucas' drum kit in lighter fluid and set it ablaze – with Lucas still attempting to play on behind it. (Manson apparently forgot that the band had one more date to play.) Lucas quit the band after the final gig the next night. Less than two weeks later his replacement, Kenneth Wilson, better known by his stage name Ginger Fish, joined the group. Marilyn Manson was touring again, this time on a bill with Danzig and Korn.
That tour ended in summer 1995, after which the band relocated to the new home of Nothing Studios in New Orleans, Louisiana to begin work on the third single from Portrait of an American Family, "Dope Hat". Accompanied by a music video which featured Manson in the role of Willy Wonka in a shock-horror version of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, the proposed single for "Dope Hat" eventually developed into an hour-long EP, Smells Like Children. The EP's fifteen tracks of covers, remixes, and bizarre sonic experiments also included the band's version of the Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", which would prove to be Marilyn Manson's first legitimate hit: the video was placed in heavy rotation on MTV (in stark contrast with the "Dope Hat" video, which MTV had banished to late-night airplay only a few months before) and the mainstream music press was suddenly clamoring to cover the group. It was also around this time that the group began to experiment with goth makeup, and more bizarre outfits.
A seven-month headlining tour followed, from June through February, during which the band began to debut new material including "Irresponsible Hate Anthem", "Minute of Decay", "Tourniquet", and "Smells Like Children" (an early incarnation of "Kinderfeld"). Rumors of a new album circulated widely during this time, and were confirmed when the band returned to Nothing's New Orleans studio in early 1996 to perform what Manson termed "a musical ritual designed to bring about the Apocalypse".[25]
Antichrist Superstar (1996–1997)[edit]



 Twiggy Ramirez live in Argentina during the "Dead to the World Tour".
Marilyn Manson's second full-length studio album, Antichrist Superstar, was released on October 8, 1996. The rock opera concept album was recorded at Nothing Studios with Trent Reznor himself acting as executive producer; the process of making the album was reportedly a long and difficult one, highlighted by experiments allegedly involving sleep deprivation and near-constant drug use in an effort to create an environment suited to the album's moody and occasionally violent content. During this time, antagonism between band members was high, which caused the departure of guitarist and Spooky Kids founding member Daisy Berkowitz. With Berkowitz out of the band, Twiggy Ramirez performed lead guitar for much of the recording of Antichrist Superstar, and the group placed an ad seeking a new guitarist for its upcoming tour; Timothy Linton, auditioned for and was given the position. Breaking with the six-year tradition of icon / killer naming structures, the newest member was dubbed Zim Zum – a name derived from Kabbalah,[26] one of the major sources of inspiration for the album.





The Beautiful People







Album version, as it appeared on Antichrist Superstar

Problems playing this file? See media help.




Tourniquet







Album version, as it appeared on Antichrist Superstar

Problems playing this file? See media help.
The album's first single, "The Beautiful People", made a fairly major impact on the alternative rock charts, and created enough anticipation for Antichrist Superstar that the album debuted at number three on the album charts.[27] The band's frontman was featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine who also awarded the band their Best New Artist accolade for 1996.[27] "I've always felt in my heart that we were going to get there," remarked Manson. "I don't think there's any reason why someone with as much to say as me should be limited to saying it to a few people. I should be on the same scale as the Spice Girls or Michael Jackson."[28]
The year-and-a-half long "Dead to the World Tour" in support of the album followed; it was the band's longest and widest-ranging tour yet, and included Marilyn Manson's live debut in Alaska, Hawaii, the United Kingdom, continental Europe, South America, Asia and Australia as their fame spread to all corners of the world. In the United States, however, the band was receiving more attention than ever before, and not all of it was positive.
As the tour was getting underway, the band found itself the target of congressional hearings, led by Senator Joseph Lieberman, to determine the effects, if any, of violent lyrics on young listeners. Lieberman would later go on to refer to Marilyn Manson as "perhaps the sickest group ever promoted by a mainstream record company".[29] In addition, nearly every performance on the tour was picketed by religious organizations, pleading with fans to not see the musician who once said "I think every time people listen to this new album maybe God will be destroyed in their brainwashed minds."[30]
On November 10, 1997, the band released a remix/live EP, Remix & Repent, featuring new versions of Antichrist Superstar's four singles, "The Beautiful People", "Tourniquet", "Antichrist Superstar", and "Man that You Fear", alongside songs recorded live on the U.S. leg of the Dead to the World Tour. Two unreleased songs from the Antichrist Superstar recording sessions were contributed to film soundtracks: "Apple of Sodom" to David Lynch's Lost Highway, and "The Suck for Your Solution" to the Howard Stern biopic Private Parts. As the year ended, Manson made the announcement of the upcoming publication of his first book, the autobiographical The Long Hard Road out of Hell; the book was released in February 1998, along with another live document of the world tour, a home video entitled Dead to the World. It also came to light around this time that Antichrist Superstar would be the first installment in a concept album trilogy and that the release of the follow-up was, according to the band, also imminent, accompanied by early rumors of the involvement of Billy Corgan and The Dust Brothers with the as-yet-untitled album.
Mechanical Animals (1998–1999)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson singing "The Speed of Pain" live.
On September 15, 1998, Marilyn Manson released the second part of his triptych, Mechanical Animals, an album strongly influenced by David Bowie and his 1974 album Diamond Dogs. Interscope's promotion of the album was massive, including an enormous billboard of singer Manson as an androgynous extraterrestrial over Times Square, and repeated appearances on MTV and other networks to promote the album and the single "The Dope Show"; propelled by the success of Antichrist Superstar and by this press push, the album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart.




The Dope Show







Album version, as it appeared on Mechanical Animals

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Coma White







Album version, as it appeared on Mechanical Animals

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The band had recast itself in a new image for this album; Marilyn Manson were now a glam rock outfit, setting aside the bleak darkness of the previous record for a more concealed morbidity and borrowing its visual presentation largely from Bowie, and from Roxy Music and its contemporaries. By this time, the band had permanently relocated to Los Angeles, and Zim Zum had been replaced by glam-influenced guitarist John Lowery, who joined the band as John 5.
After a brief promotional tour, the band set out on the "Beautiful Monsters Tour" with Hole and Monster Magnet as support. The tour, however, would be a problematic one: on March 1, 1999, the three bands played the first show in Spokane, Washington; by March 14, Hole had left the tour and Manson had broken his ankle, forcing postponements of some shows. The tour was then renamed the "Rock Is Dead Tour" and both Jack Off Jill and Nashville Pussy were asked to take select remaining opening slots on tour.[31] Less than three weeks after the tour resumed, two students (Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold) at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado killed thirteen people, and then took their own lives; early media reports declared them fans of "violent" music and video games. Substantial attention was directed at the frontman. On April 28, out of respect for the victims, the band canceled the remaining dates of the tour, and would not reappear in Denver until the 2001 Ozzfest.
Holy Wood (2000–2002)[edit]
The latter half of 1999 and much of 2000 was a period of relative silence for Marilyn Manson. The band spent over a year quietly writing and recording in a studio in Death Valley, with only the single Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes — an outtake from Antichrist Superstar[32] — appearing during that time. On November 14, 2000, Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was released. Returning to the darker, more abrasive sound of Antichrist Superstar, much of the album's content was written in response to the Columbine massacre. The album's third single, "The Nobodies", was directly inspired by the shootings.




"Disposable Teens"







Album version, as it appeared on Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

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Described by the band as the third part of the trilogy begun with Antichrist Superstar and continued in Mechanical Animals, its overarching theme is an exploration of the relationship between death and fame in American culture, and its lyrics and artwork contain many references to John F. Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald, John Lennon and Mark David Chapman, and even Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth. The international "Guns, God and Government Tour" expanded upon the exploration of America's fascination with violence, and with the tour's logo – a rifle and handguns arranged to resemble the Christian cross — Manson made no attempt to conceal what he saw as the source of that fascination.
The band also revealed that within Marilyn Manson's massive concept album trilogy,[33] Holy Wood serves as prequel to Mechanical Animals and Antichrist Superstar despite the latter two preceding Holy Wood in release date.[34][35] Each of the three albums contain its own storyline distinct from one other but also linked together abstractly in a fourth larger overarching storyline encompassing all three.[35] Manson has offered this much in the way of an interpretation: "[Holy Wood is about] wanting to fit into a world that didn't want me, and fighting really hard to get there. [The album's deepest elements] are idealism and the desire to start a revolution. If you begin with Holy Wood, then Mechanical Animals really talks about how that revolution gets taken away from you and turned into a product, and then Antichrist Superstar is where you're given a choice to decide if you're going to be controlled by the power that you created or if you want to destroy yourself and then start over. It just becomes a cycle."[34]
On May 16, 2001, Manson announced on the band website that he planned to quote the Bible at his next concert, to "balance out" his violent lyrics, "so we can examine the virtues of wonderful Christian stories of disease, murder, adultery, suicide and child sacrifice. Now that seems like entertainment to me".[36][37] On June 21, 2001, Manson did indeed read from the Bible onstage in Denver, Colorado, presenting such passages as Leviticus 20:9 ("For every one that curseth his father or his mother shall surely be put to death") and Psalm 137:9 ("Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones").
This tour was documented in a DVD release of the same name, released October 29, 2002 and described by Manson as "This will help you see what it's like to be nailed to this wrecking ball" on the DVD packaging.[38][39] In addition to a compilation style concert from the tour [songs from multiple individual shows edited to appear as single performance], the DVD includes a short thirty minute film titled "Death Parade" in the style of an All Access Pass for the tour.[39]
Seven years later it was followed by Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. Released in Blu-ray on November 17, 2009, it depicts the sixteen song set of the Los Angeles performance in its entirety.[40][41]
The Golden Age of Grotesque and "farewell" (2003–2005)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Ozzfest in 2003.
With the "triptych" of the previous three albums now complete, Marilyn Manson was free to begin a fresh project. In 2002, Jonathan Davis of Korn invited Marilyn Manson into a studio to record vocals on a track he wrote titled "Redeemer". The song, produced by both Jon and Richard Gibbs, was then released on the Queen of the Damned soundtrack. After finding inspiration in the decadent Swing era of the 1920s, the band recorded The Golden Age of Grotesque that year and the album was released on May 13, 2003.





"mOBSCENE"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque

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Eschewing the lyrical depth and volume of symbolism and hidden meaning of Holy Wood, the new album was relatively straightforward; in an extended metaphor, Manson compares his own often-criticized music to the entartete Kunst banned by the Nazi regime. New member Tim Skold, replacing Twiggy Ramirez, added a new dimension to the band's sound; he brought with him from KMFDM that band's use of heavy industrial beats—The Golden Age of Grotesque was frequently impugned[by whom?] as derivative of KMFDM and lacking the originality that Marilyn Manson had become known for.[42][43] The album debuted at No. 1 on the album charts, selling over 118,000 copies in the US its first week of release.[44] It won a 2003 Metal Edge Readers' Choice Award for "Album of the Year".[45]
Another world tour, the "Grotesk Burlesk Tour", followed, which furthered the album's Weimar Republic-inspired theme by adding elements of German Kabarett to the group's performances. Elaborate artwork by Gottfried Helnwein appeared in the band's stage dressing, and the members began appearing both on-stage and off- in designer suits and with fashion superstars.
Lest We Forget: The Best Of was released on September 28, 2004. It was referred to by Manson as his "farewell" album[46] when earlier that month, coinciding with Trent Reznor leaving New Orleans for the west coast, the Nine Inch Nails website officially announced "nothing studios: 1994–2004", suggesting that Nothing Studios was closed. This later proved to be the end of the associated vanity record label, as well as Manson's business association (effectively then shifting the band to a full Interscope contract) when Reznor successfully sued co-founder John Malm for fraud and breach of fiduciary duty (amongst others). Lest We Forget was supported by a series of "greatest hits" performances, the "Against All Gods Tour". After the release of the single "Personal Jesus", the band made a number of promotional appearances including a performance on MADtv;[47] at one of these, the Comet awards show in Germany, drummer Ginger Fish fell from his drum riser, fracturing his skull and wrist.[48] Former Nine Inch Nails drummer Chris Vrenna replaced him; after recovering from the accident Fish had been recording and performing with a new band, Martyr Plot, before rejoining Marilyn Manson.
John 5 had also been replaced; Mark Chaussee of Fight took over lead guitar on the "Against All Gods Tour", and was subsequently replaced in the studio by Tim Skold. Though John 5 denied any hostility towards Marilyn Manson following the announcement of his departure, at the band's appearance on the Rock am Ring music festival in 2003 an incident took place between John 5 and Marilyn Manson where Manson kicked and then shoved the guitarist. John 5 responded with anger, throwing off his guitar mid-song and raising his fists to Manson, before resuming the song. Lest We Forget was certified Gold in 2005.[49]
The Interscope years[edit]
Eat Me, Drink Me (2006–2008)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing "The Nobodies" in Florence, Italy during the "Rape of the World Tour".
Beginning in January 2006, and continuing for some months, Marilyn Manson's official website was updated several times, adding new artwork and music, and making obtuse references to The Celebritarian Corporation, an art movement led by the frontman. Merchandise has since become available featuring logos such as the "double cross" (a variation on the Cross of Lorraine), as well as the slogans "we will sell our shadow to those who stand within it" and "do not seek death; seek destruction".




"If I Was Your Vampire"







Album version, as it appeared on Eat Me, Drink Me

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Marilyn Manson's sixth studio album, Eat Me, Drink Me, was released on June 5, 2007, debuting at number 8 in the United States with more than 88,000 copies sold.[9] Released more than four years after The Golden Age of Grotesque, Eat Me, Drink Me marked another change in musical styles that the band has become famous for – opting for a more introspective direction. One remarkable note of the album is that it was written entirely by Manson and Skold in a rented home studio. The album is also the first major label Manson album without Madonna Wayne Gacy (Pogo) as a listed member, making lead singer Marilyn Manson the only original member since Portrait of an American Family. Chris Vrenna, who temporarily replaced Ginger Fish on drums during the Against All Gods Tour, replaced Pogo to become the band's full-time keyboardist. Marilyn Manson co-headlined a tour with Slayer in order to promote the album with Bleeding Through as the opening act and Deadly Apples on select dates.
Rumors also circulated for some time that Marilyn Manson wrote the song "Mutilation Is the Most Sincere Form of Flattery" as an attack on the band My Chemical Romance. He later denied this, stating that it was aimed at people in general who sought to imitate him. In another interview Manson stated that "I'm embarrassed to be me because these people are doing a really sad, pitiful, shallow version of what I've done".[50] In response to this, Gerard Way, the lead singer of My Chemical Romance claimed nothing Manson could say would bring the band down.
On January 9, 2008 Marilyn Manson posted a bulletin on MySpace confirming that former bassist Twiggy Ramirez had rejoined the band, resulting in the exit of Tim Skold. Skold and Manson had apparently began writing new material before the personnel change. Future collaborations with Skold were not ruled out.[51][52][53]
The High End of Low (2008–2009)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing at Quart Festival in 2009.
The band's seventh full-length studio album began recording sessions following the conclusion of their "Rape of the World Tour" on March 2, 2008.[54] The actual recording took place at Manson's Hollywood Hills home between November 2008 and January 5, 2009. The last song, called "15", was completed on the evening of Manson's Jan 5 birthday—hence the name.[55]
Manson said, "after my greatest hits album (Lest We Forget: The Best Of) came out I took a long break from music because it was a period where I was not sure who I wanted to be. I left music for a while but that's not an error I want to repeat in the future." He mentioned Kerry King, James Iha former guitarist of The Smashing Pumpkins, and Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs as likely contributors.[56] During an exclusive interview titled Everyone Will Suffer Now at the now-defunct fansite MansonUSA on January 11, 2008, Manson shared, "I just feel like there is a big change happening now. It's going to be the one. Eat Me, Drink Me is opening the window and this is going to be the Hurricane Katrina."[57] Since parting company with Skold and reuniting with Ramirez, the band had occupied themselves with work on the album to achieve their target of a February 2009 release. It was soon followed by the announcement of new tour dates. In an interview with Steppin' Out, Manson described the then-nascent record as, "very ruthless, very heavy, and very violent".[56]
On August 14, 2008, Manson announced at a public interview in Seoul, Korea that former Limp Bizkit guitarist and current Black Light Burns frontman Wes Borland had joined the lineup, replacing Rob Holliday on guitars. The band attended the ETP Festival and were wrapping up production on the new album. However, Borland left a few months later to reunite with Limp Bizkit for the third time. Borland told UK's Kerrang Magazine that he quit after seeing none of the nine songs he wrote for the record make the final cut, and was extremely dissatisfied at the thought of being just a hired gun.[58]
On October 5, the band played a special show at the annual Hot Topic managers meeting. The show took place at the Los Angeles International Airport's Marriott Hotel. During an after party for the 2008 Scream Awards, Manson was overheard comparing the new album to Antichrist Superstar and stating the album was "pretty much finished." In an interview on the February 2009 issue of Revolver Magazine, he revealed the title of two songs, namely, "I Wanna Kill You Like They Do in the Movies" and "Armagoddamnmotherfuckinggeddon". The album's producer Sean Beavan, later posted a Myspace blog revealing two more song titles, "15" and "Four Rusted Horses".
A statement was released by Manson on Christmas Eve in order to dispel rumors that had been circulating regarding his relationship with Evan Rachel Wood and a speculated collaboration with rapper Ne-Yo.[59] On January 12, a new song title was divulged by Rudy Coby, a collaborator and friend of the frontman. The song is called "Devour" and was said to be the album's first track.
Marilyn Manson joined Slayer as headliners for the Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival tour in 2009. The press release for the tour stated that "Manson is currently in the studio working on his seventh studio album scheduled for release May 18th on Interscope Records." On February 2, Rolling Stone confirmed the album had been officially titled The High End of Low.
On March 18, 2009, Kerrang! reported that the album contained a total of 15 tracks and that the final song is called "15". They also revealed another new song entitled "We're from America". Manson opined on the latter song, "I think a lot of people will hear the track and initially think it's just political, but it's not just that, it's also me describing a lot of fucked-up scenarios that I'm going through in my personal life. Someone asked me, 'Why are you so fucked up?', 'Well, I am from America.' I hate the fact that so many people have fucked the country up, and so many people fucked up my personal life and I allowed it to happen. So in a way, I feel like America as a whole feels, but in no way does that make me a tree-hugging patriotic freedom rocker." The track was released exclusively on the band's official website as a free download on March 27, 2009. On April 7, it became available for purchase as a digital single.
The album's official first single, "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon," arrived in radio stations on April 21. It peaked at number 37 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Chart.[60] On April 16, 2009, marilynmanson.com was updated with a new splash page featuring the projected album artwork as well as the track listing for The High End of Low. The record was released on May 26, 2009. It debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 with 49,000 copies sold.[10] Despite reaching a higher charting position than Manson's prior studio effort Eat Me, Drink Me, which debuted at number 8,[9] it arrived with the lowest opening week sum of any of Manson's albums since The Last Tour on Earth opened with sales of 26,000 units in 1999.
After much fan speculation and no official announcement, Andy Gerold joined Marilyn Manson in the capacity of live bassist for "The High End of Low Tour" after former bassist Twiggy Ramirez switched to lead guitar duties. Gerold played his first show with the band on June 3, 2009, in Brno, Czech Republic. As of 2011, Gerold is still the youngest musician to play in the band, preceding former drummer Sara Lee Lucas by nearly seven years. During the summer of 2009, the band co-headlined the 2009 Mayhem Festival with Slayer.[61] Later in October 2009, the band headlined the internationally advertised visual kei event, V-Rock Music festival.[62]
The Cooking Vinyl years[edit]
Born Villain (2009–2013)[edit]



 Marilyn Manson performing during the Twins Of Evil Tour in 2012.
The eighth studio album by Marilyn Manson entered the writing phase during "The High End of Low Tour" in 2009.[63] Bassist Twiggy projected a release date of 2011 through Cooking Vinyl Records and Marilyn Manson's own label Hell, etc.[64] It is the band's first album since allowing their contract with Interscope Records to expire back in late 2009. Marilyn Manson attested that the lyrical content of the album will be "more romantic" yet "self-abusive,"[63] and described the sonic elements of the record as "suicide death metal."[65]
The prospect of an eighth studio album by the band was first confirmed by the frontman himself during an interview with Metal Hammer on December 3, 2009.[63] He elaborated, "We've just been released from our record contract with Interscope so I think a lot of the creative control on which my hands were tied on a lot of choices—the music videos—things like that. And the first example is the newest video, they clearly wouldn't have allowed me to make that video. So we started writing new songs on the road—a bit like [David Bowie's album] Aladdin Sane—I think people can expect a new record a lot sooner than we [expected]."[63] According to Chris Vrenna, by January 2010, the band was already "talking and coming up with concepts" for the album.[66] On January 24, 2010, Manson confirmed on the band's official MySpace profile that "the new album is officially in motion."[67]
In April 2010, during his appearance at the Revolver Golden Gods Awards, Manson divulged that the band had recorded 13 songs, one of which failed to appear in a television series about vampires.[65] He referred to the album as "very death metal" and voiced interest in releasing the album differently from previous Marilyn Manson records.[65] He also indicated his friendship with Slayer as a vague influence on the record.[65] During an interview with Full Metal Jackie, he stated that the album was halfway finished.[68]
On May 7, 2010, both entertainer Rudy Coby and The Nachtkabarett's Nick Kushner were previewed material from the album, the latter described it on Facebook as "fuckin' hardcore." Elaborating on the band's musical direction, Manson commented on Twiggy being influenced by his touring experiences in 2009, particularly during the Rockstar Mayhem Festival. Manson's father, Hugh Warner, described the album,

It will make a vagina wet. What can you say after that? If the vagina's wet, all things are good. That's what he [Manson] told me when I was listening to it. It's very hard, very heavy, very good. Everyone should be extremely excited and happy.[69]
During an interview with Eric Blair on November 3, 2010, bassist Twiggy Ramirez indicated that the new album was "almost done. It'll probably be out next year. [...] It's our best record yet, I think. I mean, everyone always says that, but I think this is our best work so far... It's kind of like a little more of a punk rock Mechanical Animals without sounding too pretentious."[70]




"Overneath The Path Of Misery"







Album version, as it appeared on Born Villain

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For much of the early half of 2011, Marilyn Manson removed himself from the public spotlight and ceased almost all communication with his fans or the outside world.[71] On February 24, 2011, the band's longtime drummer Ginger Fish announced his resignation from the group, prompting a search for a replacement.[72] Meanwhile, on March 18, 2011, Marilyn Manson took a short break from his self-imposed sequestration by appearing in the music video for the song "Tempat Ku" by Brunei pop outfit D'Hask.[71] On March 23, 2011, he uploaded new pictures onto the band's Facebook page, in a different style of previous photos.[73] The new style suggested the 'new era' of Marilyn Manson had begun, further generating anticipation for the upcoming release.



 Unveiled on May 22, 2011, the new CMYK-styled logo is used by the band to signify the eighth studio album and their new era.[74][75]
On May 22, 2011, the band's website underwent a complete overhaul. A short 26 second snippet of a new song, tentatively titled, "I am among no one (excerpt from an undisclosed song with an unreleased title)"[74] was uploaded to the redesigned main page along with a new logo to signify their eight studio album and the new era. The logo consisted of the letter M repeated four times in a spiral pattern, each with one long tail. At the end of the long tail is the Chinese trigram ☲ (離 lí) of the I Ching. Read lengthwise or up-and-down, it formed Hexagram 30, "Radiance," also called "the clinging" and "the net". The origin of the character is rooted in symbols of long-tailed birds such as the peacock or the legendary phoenix. The CMYK coloring was also notable with regard to an acrostic formed by Manson, in a journal entry that accompanied the site changes, which spelled out the words "Christianity Manufactures Yesterdays Killers".[74][75]
On June 3, 2011 the Brazilian edition of the Portuguese broadsheet newspaper Destak confirmed that agents for the band had finalized negotiations for the group to tour in Brazil and other South American countries as part of the SWU Music & Arts Festival beginning on the second week of November 2011.[76] The Brazilian music festival also saw a change in venue for 2011.[76] While organizers have yet to finalize details, it was speculated that the event may be held at the São Paulo municipality of Paulínia.[76] Manson appeared live via the Ustream broadcast of Fleischer's Universe on June 21, 2011, where he announced that the new album title will be revealed within a week. He also divulged the following lyrics, "The center of the universe cannot exist if there are no edges", of a yet to be released song.[77] The album title was not, in fact, revealed within a week, but was announced on September 1 as Born Villain via Twitter.
After being impressed by his directorial work on one of Kid Cudi's music videos, Marilyn Manson employed the actor Shia LaBeouf to work on the album artwork as well as create a "making-of" video documenting the album's recording and production.[78][79][80]
On November 22, 2011, it was announced that Chris Vrenna had officially left the band after contributing to the writing and production of Born Villain.[81]
On May 1, 2012, Born Villain was released worldwide. It debuted at No. 10 on the Billboard 200, No. 3 on Top 100 Rock albums, and No. 1 on both Top Independent Albums and Hard Rock Albums.
Two months prior to release, the band begun to support the album with the Hey Cruel World... Tour and joint concerts with Rob Zombie and Alice Cooper on the Twins of Evil Tour and Masters of Madness Tour.[82][83]
The Pale Emperor (2013-present)[edit]
Marilyn Manson started production for his ninth studio album in 2013. In early 2014, Gil Sharone of Stolen Babies revealed he had been working on the new album since November.[84][85] A new song, titled "Cupid Carries a Gun", was used as the opening theme to the television series Salem. The song was composed alongside music producer Tyler Bates,[86] and had been described by Manson as "the last track we finished for my new album",[87] indicating that production for his next studio album had been completed. On June 25, Fred Sablan confirmed he had left the band on good terms, and was replaced on bass guitar by Twiggy for their summer tour.[88] Bates and Paul Wiley took over as the band's live guitarists.[89][90]
The band's scheduled performance at the Park Live Festival in Moscow on June 27 was cancelled by the event's organisers moments before the band was due to arrive on stage. Authorities received numerous bomb threats, while hundreds of activists affiliated with the Russian Orthodox Church were seen protesting outside the venue. The incident culminated in the assault of several of the band's crew members outside their hotel.[91] Two days later, another performance in the Russian city of Novosibirsk was cancelled when authorities refused to allow the show to go ahead, accusing Manson of insulting the beliefs of the Orthodox church and of "promoting sadomasochism".[92]
On September 3, Manson confirmed that the new album is "prepared for landing".[93] A large portion of another new song, titled "Killing Strangers", was featured in the film John Wick, which was released in cinemas on October 24.[94][95] On October 26, "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" was premiered on BBC Radio 1's Rock Show by Daniel P. Carter. Immediately following the broadcast, the song was made available for free download on Manson's official site.[96] Manson garnered significant media attention when a video depicting the simulated rape of singer-songwriter Lana Del Rey was posted onto YouTube by production company Sturmgruppe.[97] The video, titled "Sturmgruppe 2013 Reel", appeared to show simulated footage of film director Eli Roth attacking Del Rey, which was interspersed with unrelated footage from two of the band's previous music videos — "No Reflection" and "Slo-Mo-Tion", both from their 2012 album Born Villain.[98][99][100] Manson's representatives later released a statement to Billboard, denying that he had any involvement in the production of the rape scenes.[101] The audio of "Deep Six" was released on the bands official YouTube account on December 15,[102] with the music video following four days later.[103]
The Pale Emperor was released in the US on January 20, 2015.
Controversy[edit]
In December 1996, a press conference was called by William J. Bennett, Senator Joseph Lieberman, and activist C. DeLores Tucker, aimed at MCA, the owner of Interscope Records. Calling several albums released by the label – including Antichrist Superstar — "profane", "violent", "filth", and "crap"[104][105] the group questioned MCA president Edgar Bronfman, Jr.'s ability to head the label competently while profiting from such material. That November 6, U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management and Restructuring held a public hearing on the effect of violent rock and rap lyrics on youths. Supporters of the band claim it was merely another salvo in Senator Lieberman's declared war on the band. The hearing, chaired by Representative Sam Brownback, featured the testimony of Lieberman and Tucker, and of Raymond Kuntz, of Burlington, North Dakota, who blamed his son's suicide on Antichrist Superstar, which Lieberman denounced as "vile, hateful, nihilistic and damaging."[105]
The band's performances have come under fire – the Dead to the World Tour, in particular, was followed by protesters at nearly every North American venue it visited. The band's March 10, 1997 performance in Columbia, South Carolina was canceled "in response to growing public pressure by religious, civic and political leaders who criticized the group's image".[106] The owner of Calgary's Max Bell Centre had Marilyn Manson's July 25 show canceled, citing "immorality" and the band's "use of animals on stage." Another concert in Portland was canceled a few days later due to Manson's reputation, and the venue's inability to get insurance for the show.[107]
The New Jersey date of Ozzfest '97, to be held at Giants Stadium, was canceled by the New Jersey Sports and Exhibition Authority, who cited Marilyn Manson's performance as its reason; the event was only held after Ozzy Osbourne himself successfully sued the state, which compelled the authorities to allow the concert. Legislation was introduced and passed in South Carolina and Utah allowing state-operated venues to ban groups like Marilyn Manson from performing and, in at least one instance, in Florida, local schools have gone so far as to threaten expulsion for students in attendance of Marilyn Manson concerts.[29]
School shootings[edit]
Columbine massacre[edit]



"I couldn't care less about those kids' reasoning. What reason do we have to go to war? It's all the same. Killing somebody can't be justified by having a reason. I think it says a lot about the [news] media that those two kids were on the cover of Time magazine twice because I'm sure that's everything they wanted. They wanted fame. America sold them the idea that an obituary is just another headline."
—Marilyn Manson on the Columbine massacre.[108]
Following the Columbine High School massacre, there were accusations that killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were influenced by Marilyn Manson's music. When later evidence was presented that neither Harris nor Klebold were fans of the band,[109] many were led to criticize the media for using the band as a scapegoat instead of analyzing the underlying societal problems surrounding the incident.[110] In the controversial documentary Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore interviewed Manson about the tragedy. When asked what he would say to the children of Columbine High and their community, Manson replied "I wouldn't say a single word to them; I would listen to what they have to say, and that's what no one did".[111][112] Manson also submitted an op-ed piece to Rolling Stone magazine [June 24, 1999] titled "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?",[113] which detailed his opinion on violence as an inherent cultural presence as well as discussing the shootings and his status as an easy target for blame in incidents of this kind. He also said that he expresses condolences to the victim's families. Rapper Eminem criticized the controversy in his song "The Way I Am", which contains the line, "When a dude's gettin' bullied and shoots up his school/And they blame it on Marilyn, and the heroin/Where were the parents at?". Marilyn Manson made a cameo in the video for the song, and even contributed vocals to a guitar-heavy remix.
Other shootings[edit]
The controversy connecting Marilyn Manson and American school shootings continued on October 10, 2007 when 14-year-old Asa Coon opened gunfire on his high school in Cleveland, Ohio. SuccessTech Academy went to lock-down status around 1:15 pm, when Coon shot four people; including two students, and two teachers, before turning the gun on himself. Police reports, and student interviews claim that Coon was wearing a Marilyn Manson T-shirt during the rampage. On several occasions, Coon told students and teachers that he did not believe in, nor respect God; instead worshipped the band's vocalist, Brian Warner. Coon was known for violent behavior, and stood out among the student body for his appearance—which included black boots, a black trench coat, black nail polish, and rock T-shirts.[114]
Musical style[edit]
The Marilyn Manson band has produced music in many genres throughout its career. The first stage shows and cassettes were gothic rock.[2] After getting signed to Nothing, their first album, Portrait of an American Family, was industrial metal. Their first hit single, the cover of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", was hard rock.[115] 1996's Antichrist Superstar was balanced between industrial rock, progressive metal, gothic rock and shock metal.[116] In 1998 for Mechanical Animals, the band shifted gears to create a rock opera in the style of glam rock. This was reversed in 2000 with Holy Wood‍ '​s return to industrial metal and heavy goth rock.[115] 2003's The Golden Age of Grotesque added an electronic aspect to the industrial metal, but 2007's Eat Me, Drink Me showed a relatively cleaner arena rock production style.[117][118] 2009's predictable The High End of Low[119] and 2012's energetic Born Villain were both industrial metal. 2015's The Pale Emperor introduced a blues rock aspect to the hard rock and industrial metal.[120]
Influences[edit]
Initially, after being introduced to Big Black's album Songs About Fucking by a fellow Miami clubgoer, who would become his keyboard player, Madonna Wayne Gacy, Manson had the desire to form a rock band that used a drum machine — an uncommon technique outside of dance music at the time.[6] The earliest incarnations of Marilyn Manson used this setup, and produced experimental, drum-heavy compositions similar to Steve Albini's work with Big Black; later, with the addition of a live drummer, the band's composing process, recording techniques, and live performances were by necessity altered. Guitarist Daisy Berkowitz and bassist Gidget Gein, who came from punk rock backgrounds, brought the musicianship and songwriting style of the Jim Carroll Band (whose "People Who Died" was an early favorite cover for Marilyn Manson) and the showmanship of The New York Dolls to the mixture. After the band spent some time at Nothing, their sound gathered sonic elements from other bands on that label's roster, like Nine Inch Nails and Prick.
Evidently, Manson himself is heavily influenced by the shock rock stylings of such artists as Arthur Brown, Alice Cooper, The Doors, Black Sabbath, Kiss and some of Iggy Pop as a young music fan;[6] however, later influences have come from the glam rock of David Bowie (who Manson claims is his biggest influence), whose chameleon-like ability to shift from one style to another, replete with a new look and musical philosophy, was a characteristic which would also be frequently ascribed to Marilyn Manson by the music press.[121] Such an influence is exemplified in the similarities between the music videos of Bowie's "The Hearts Filthy Lesson" and many of Manson's videos, such as "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" (Floria Sigismondi has directed music videos for both Bowie ("Little Wonder") and Manson ("The Beautiful People" and "Tourniquet").) He also became later fond of The Cure and Bauhaus around the Eat Me, Drink Me period. The hard rock background of John 5 amplified this aspect of the band's sound in live performances; Tim Skold, a former guitarist, bassist, and vocalist in Shotgun Messiah, later blended in that band's mixture of industrial drums and guitars. Influence on the electronic sound of the band has likely came from bands and artists such as Depeche Mode and Gary Numan, the latter of which switched from a synthpop style to more a darker more industrial rock sound which Manson's band performs within. Both Manson and musical associate Trent Reznor who play in this industrial style are likely influenced by Numan as Manson has been quoted with saying "I was always into his apocalyptic fiction lyrics. He pioneered electronic dance music." Whilst Reznor has said "After hearing 'Cars' I knew I wanted to make music with synthesizers. The Pleasure Principle and Telekon are fucking great because they're so cold sounding. Numan's early albums painted an emotional place that wasn't pleasant to be at. It seemed like creepy science fiction in an unpleasant way." Manson's first official recorded cover was "Down in the Park" and Reznor has performed with Numan himself.
Both Manson and Twiggy Ramirez have mentioned the influence of Queen on their more melodic work, particularly on Mechanical Animals and Eat Me, Drink Me, the latter of which Twiggy did not participate in.
Band members[edit]
Main article: List of Marilyn Manson band members
Many members have contributed performances (either live or in-studio) on instruments other than their primary ones. For instance, Ramirez has played guitar on several records while his live instrument is bass, Gacy ("Pogo") has played keyboards, theremin and calliope, Manson has played pan flute, harpsichord, keyboards, and guitar, and Berkowitz has been credited with bass guitar and drum machines. Vrenna filled in on drums for Fish when he was injured, and later replaced Gacy on keyboards.
Current membersMarilyn Manson – lead vocals, tambourine, saxophone, pan flute (1989–present)
Paul Wiley – lead guitar (2015–present ; also some shows in 2014), rhythm guitar (2014–2015) programming, backing vocals (2014–present)
Twiggy Ramirez – bass, guitars, keyboards, backing vocals (1993–2002, 2008–present)
Gil Sharone – drums (2014–present)
 Former membersZsa Zsa Speck – keyboards (1989–1990)
Olivia Newton Bundy – bass (1989–1990)
Gidget Gein – bass (1990–1993)
Sara Lee Lucas – drums (1990–1995)
Daisy Berkowitz – guitar (1989–1996)
Zim Zum – guitar (1996–1998)
John 5 – guitars (1998–2004)
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, percussions, programming (1990–2007)
Tim Sköld – guitars, keyboards, basses, backing vocals (2002–2008)
Ginger Fish – drums (1995–2011)
Chris Vrenna – keyboards, percussions, programming (2007–2011)
Fred Sablan – bass (2010–2014)
Tyler Bates – guitar, backing vocals (2014–2015)
Former touring membersChris Vrenna – drums (2004–2005)
Mark Chaussee – guitar, bass (2004–2005)
Rob Holliday – guitar, bass, backing vocals (2007–2008)
Wes Borland – guitar (2008–2009)
Andy Gerold – bass, guitar (2009–2010)
Jason Sutter – drums (2012–2014)
Spencer Rollins – keyboards, guitar (2013)

Discography[edit]
Main article: Marilyn Manson (band) discography
Studio albumsPortrait of an American Family (1994)
Antichrist Superstar (1996)
Mechanical Animals (1998)
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000)
The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003)
Eat Me, Drink Me (2007)
The High End of Low (2009)
Born Villain (2012)
The Pale Emperor (2015)
Awards[edit]
Billboard Music Video Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1998 "The Dope Show"[122] Best Clip (Hard Rock/Metal) Won
Maximum Vision Award Won
Grammy Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Hard Rock Performance Nominated
2001 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2004 "mOBSCENE" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2013 "No Reflection" Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Nominated
MTV Video Music Awards[edit]

Year
Recipient / Nominated work
Award
Result
1996 "Sweet Dreams" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
1997 "The Beautiful People" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
Best Special Effects in a Video Nominated
Best Art Direction in a Video Nominated
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Cinematography in a Video Won
Miscellaneous awards and honors[edit]

Year
Nominated work
Award/honor
Nominator

1992 Marilyn Manson Best Heavy Metal Band New Times Magazine
1992 Marilyn Manson Best Hard Alternative Band South Florida Slammies
Band of the Year South Florida Slammies
1996 Marilyn Manson Band of the Year South Florida Slammies
1997 Marilyn Manson Best New Artist Rolling Stone
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Video of the Year Rolling Stone
2012 Born Villain Rock Album of the Year Loudwire
2012 "No Reflection" Rock Video of the Year Loudwire
2015[123] Marilyn Manson Lifetime achievement award Kerrang

References[edit]
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48.Jump up ^ "Manson's Drummer Injured In Fall". Billboard. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
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53.Jump up ^ Rolling Stone : Marilyn Manson Says Led Zeppelin Is Responsible For Reunion With Twiggy[dead link]
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67.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2009-09-23). [Archived 23 September 2009 at WebCite "Marilyn Manson on MySpace Music"]. Myspace Music. News Corporation. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
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76.^ Jump up to: a b c Flesch, José Norberto (2011-06-03). "Marilyn Manson comes to Brazil in November". Destak. Cofina. Retrieved 2011-06-08.
77.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2011-06-21). Marilyn Manson interview on Fleischer's Universe. Interview with Charles Fleischer. John Ham. Ustream.tv. Los Angeles.
78.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson recruits Shia LaBeouf to document new album". Kerrang!. Bauer Media Group. 2011-07-01. Retrieved 2011-07-01.
79.Jump up ^ Barshad, Amos (2011-07-01). "Shia LaBeouf Told Regis and Kelly He's Working With Marilyn Manson". New York. Retrieved 2011-07-01.
80.Jump up ^ "Transformers star Shia LaBeouf set to shoot new Marilyn Manson documentary". NME. IPC Media. 2011-07-01. Retrieved 2011-07-02.
81.Jump up ^ "Chris Vrenna Leaves Marilyn Manson to Focus on New Projects". Type 3 Media. 2011-11-23.
82.Jump up ^ "Masters of Madness Tour w/Alice Cooper". Marilyn Manson. 2014-03-27. Retrieved 2014-04-19.
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84.Jump up ^ "Twitter / GilSharone: That session I've been waiting ...". February 7, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
85.Jump up ^ "Video by gilsharone". November 26, 2013. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
86.Jump up ^ "New Marilyn Manson song to soundtrack TV series Salem". NME. April 25, 2014. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
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88.Jump up ^ "Twitter / Fredsablan: Lots of love for my brother ...". June 25, 2014. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
89.Jump up ^ "'Guardians of the Galaxy' Composer Tyler Bates Receives Bomb Threats". 2paragraphs. August 13, 2014. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
90.Jump up ^ "Tyler Bates completes his first European tour with Marilyn Manson". TylerBates.com. August 18, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
91.Jump up ^ "MARILYN MANSON: Bomb Threats And Protests Force Cancelation Of Two Shows in Russia". Blabbermouth.net. June 27, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
92.Jump up ^ "Authorities not allowing Marilyn Manson concert to go ahead as hundreds of religious activists protest". SBS Australia. June 28, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
93.Jump up ^ Carter, Emily (September 3, 2014). "Marilyn Manson says new album is "prepared for landing"". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group). Retrieved September 4, 2014.
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98.Jump up ^ Michaels, Sean (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson denies involvement in Lana Del Rey rape horror video". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
99.Jump up ^ Denham, Jess (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson denies involvement in shocking leaked footage from Lana Del Rey rape video". The Independent. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
100.Jump up ^ Gordon, Jeremy (November 21, 2014). "Marilyn Manson Denies Involvement in Lana Del Rey Sexual Assault Depiction Footage". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
101.Jump up ^ Warner, Denise (November 20, 2014). "Marilyn Manson's Camp on Lana Del Rey Footage: We Had Nothing to Do With This Video". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
102.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Deep Six (Official Audio)". YouTube. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
103.Jump up ^ Grow, Kory (December 19, 2014). "See Marilyn Manson's Unsettling, Phallic 'Deep Six' Video". Rolling Stone. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
104.Jump up ^ Phillips, Chuck (1996-12-10). "Critics expected to take on MCA for explicit rap lyrics". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-05-10.
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107.Jump up ^ Paula O' Keefe, "The History of Marilyn Manson, 1997 Update Part 2 of 2", at Spookhouse.net. Retrieved September 9, 2006.
108.Jump up ^ Kessler, Ted (2000-09-09). "Marilyn Manson Goes Ape". NME (IPC Media): 28–31.
109.Jump up ^ Greg, Glasgow (1999-04-23). "Marilyn Manson Concert Canceled" (BROADSHEET). The Daily Camera (Albert J. Manzi). MediaNews Group. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
110.Jump up ^ Cullen, Dave. Inside the Columbine High investigation. Salon News, September 23, 1999.
111.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson in Bowling for Columbine
112.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Interview on Bowling for Columbine". Bowling for Columbine Official Website. 2002-10-11. Retrieved 2010-11-15.
113.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (OP-ED) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
114.Jump up ^ School Shooting[dead link]
115.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Biography". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on February 21, 2009. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
116.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
117.Jump up ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Marilyn Manson – Eat Me, Drink Me". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
118.Jump up ^ Ed Thompson (2007-06-04). "Eat Me Drink Me review at IGN Music". Uk.music.ign.com. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
119.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson at NME". NME. Retrieved 2011-09-14.
120.Jump up ^ Thomas, Fred. "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". AllMusic. Retrieved June 9, 2015.
121.Jump up ^ Ankeny, Jason. Marilyn Manson. Allmusic. Retrieved December 1, 2005.
122.Jump up ^ "This Day in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. November 6, 2007. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
123.Jump up ^ http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-marilyn-manson-kerrang-lifetime-achievement-award-20150612-story.html
Literature[edit]
Danesi, Marcel (2008). Popular Culture: Introductory Perspectives. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 074255547X.
External links[edit]
 Wikimedia Commons has media related to Marilyn Manson.
Official website
Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids website
http://www.mansonwiki.com/ - The Official Marilyn Manson Encyclopedia.


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This page was last modified on 22 June 2015, at 07:38.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marilyn_Manson_(band)









Campaign (book)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Campaign

Illustrator
Shia LaBeouf (photographer)
Karolyn Pho (photographer)
Publisher
Grassy Slope Entertainment, Inc.

Publication date
 2011
Media type
Hardcover
Pages
64
ISBN
978-0-615-52986-8
Campaign is a coffee table book by Shia LaBeouf and Karolyn Pho which is attached to the project that accompanies Marilyn Manson's eighth album, Born Villain.[1][2] It was released on August 28, 2011 by LaBeouf's Grassy Slope Entertainment production company through various retailers.[3][broken citation][4]
The book, accompanied by a short film DVD, is a visual accompaniment to Marilyn Manson and LaBeouf's Born Villain joint project.[5] It is a collection of photographs taken by LaBeouf and his girlfriend, Karolyn Pho, of posters they put up to promote Born Villain, retracing the steps of a night LaBeouf spent traversing Los Angeles with Manson.[3]
The book was made available for pre-order on August 28, 2011, preceding the screening of the Born Villain short film at L.A. Silent Theatre.[3] By ordering the book, purchasers gained entry to a book signing event followed by private screening of Born Villain at 10pm of September 1, 2011, at Hennessey + Ingalls outlet in Hollywood.[5]


Contents  [hide]
1 Reception
2 Promotion
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Reception[edit]
While some fans' reaction to the book has been negative,[6] the book got good reviews, and the video, Born Villain, has a good rating on IMDB.[7]
Promotion[edit]
Born Villain Campaign was launched on the streets of LA by way of illegally pasted handbills and via the website the CampaignBook.com by Karolyn Pho and Shia La Beouf.[8] The website dedicated to the promotional campaign was discovered via a poster on August 27, 2011.
See also[edit]
Born Villain, the eighth studio album by Marilyn Manson.
Born Villain, the short film by Shia LaBeouf in collaboration with Marilyn Manson.
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Campaign Official Website". Shia LaBeouf & Karolyn Pho. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
2.Jump up ^ "Campaign book signing". Hennessey & Ingalls. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
3.^ Jump up to: a b c "Born Villain (Book + DVD)". Hennessey & Ingalls. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
4.Jump up ^ "Campaign dealers". Shia LaBeouf. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Warner, Kara (2011-08-31). "Shia LaBeouf Calls Marilyn Manson Video 'A Cool Diversion'". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-09-01.
6.Jump up ^ Homeostasis (2011-09-29). "Reactions". Babalon. Retrieved 2011-12-15.
7.Jump up ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2043796/
8.Jump up ^ Rao, Mallika (2011-08-31). "'Born Villain': The Shia LaBeouf/Marilyn Manson Collaboration Has Arrived". The Huffington Post. AOL. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
External links[edit]
Official Campaign website
Official Marilyn Manson website


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)





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Edit links
This page was last modified on 22 April 2015, at 17:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campaign_(book)













Campaign (book)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Campaign

Illustrator
Shia LaBeouf (photographer)
Karolyn Pho (photographer)
Publisher
Grassy Slope Entertainment, Inc.

Publication date
 2011
Media type
Hardcover
Pages
64
ISBN
978-0-615-52986-8
Campaign is a coffee table book by Shia LaBeouf and Karolyn Pho which is attached to the project that accompanies Marilyn Manson's eighth album, Born Villain.[1][2] It was released on August 28, 2011 by LaBeouf's Grassy Slope Entertainment production company through various retailers.[3][broken citation][4]
The book, accompanied by a short film DVD, is a visual accompaniment to Marilyn Manson and LaBeouf's Born Villain joint project.[5] It is a collection of photographs taken by LaBeouf and his girlfriend, Karolyn Pho, of posters they put up to promote Born Villain, retracing the steps of a night LaBeouf spent traversing Los Angeles with Manson.[3]
The book was made available for pre-order on August 28, 2011, preceding the screening of the Born Villain short film at L.A. Silent Theatre.[3] By ordering the book, purchasers gained entry to a book signing event followed by private screening of Born Villain at 10pm of September 1, 2011, at Hennessey + Ingalls outlet in Hollywood.[5]


Contents  [hide]
1 Reception
2 Promotion
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Reception[edit]
While some fans' reaction to the book has been negative,[6] the book got good reviews, and the video, Born Villain, has a good rating on IMDB.[7]
Promotion[edit]
Born Villain Campaign was launched on the streets of LA by way of illegally pasted handbills and via the website the CampaignBook.com by Karolyn Pho and Shia La Beouf.[8] The website dedicated to the promotional campaign was discovered via a poster on August 27, 2011.
See also[edit]
Born Villain, the eighth studio album by Marilyn Manson.
Born Villain, the short film by Shia LaBeouf in collaboration with Marilyn Manson.
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Campaign Official Website". Shia LaBeouf & Karolyn Pho. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
2.Jump up ^ "Campaign book signing". Hennessey & Ingalls. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
3.^ Jump up to: a b c "Born Villain (Book + DVD)". Hennessey & Ingalls. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
4.Jump up ^ "Campaign dealers". Shia LaBeouf. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Warner, Kara (2011-08-31). "Shia LaBeouf Calls Marilyn Manson Video 'A Cool Diversion'". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-09-01.
6.Jump up ^ Homeostasis (2011-09-29). "Reactions". Babalon. Retrieved 2011-12-15.
7.Jump up ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2043796/
8.Jump up ^ Rao, Mallika (2011-08-31). "'Born Villain': The Shia LaBeouf/Marilyn Manson Collaboration Has Arrived". The Huffington Post. AOL. Retrieved 2011-09-02.
External links[edit]
Official Campaign website
Official Marilyn Manson website


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)





Navigation menu



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Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















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Cite this page

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Download as PDF
Printable version

Languages
Українська
Edit links
This page was last modified on 22 April 2015, at 17:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campaign_(book)













Genealogies of Pain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


Genealogies of Pain is a coffee table book that was released on April 30, 2011, by Marilyn Manson and David Lynch through German publisher Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg. The 176 page paperback catalogue pairs 30 of Manson's paintings from the Genealogies of Pain art exhibit with stills from four of Lynch's early short experimental films: Six Men Getting Sick, The Grandmother, The Amputee and The Alphabet. The book also includes an interview with Manson in which he discusses his techniques as well as the art traditions and schools that have been influential to his works.[1]
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson & David Lynch: Genealogies of Pain [Hardcover]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-08-30.
External links[edit]
Official Marilyn Manson website


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)


Navigation menu



Create account
Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















Main page
Contents
Featured content
Current events
Random article
Donate to Wikipedia
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Interaction
Help
About Wikipedia
Community portal
Recent changes
Contact page

Tools
What links here
Related changes
Upload file
Special pages
Permanent link
Page information
Wikidata item
Cite this page

Print/export
Create a book
Download as PDF
Printable version

Languages
Italiano
Українська
Edit links
This page was last modified on 1 October 2014, at 23:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogies_of_Pain









Genealogies of Pain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


Genealogies of Pain is a coffee table book that was released on April 30, 2011, by Marilyn Manson and David Lynch through German publisher Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg. The 176 page paperback catalogue pairs 30 of Manson's paintings from the Genealogies of Pain art exhibit with stills from four of Lynch's early short experimental films: Six Men Getting Sick, The Grandmother, The Amputee and The Alphabet. The book also includes an interview with Manson in which he discusses his techniques as well as the art traditions and schools that have been influential to his works.[1]
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson & David Lynch: Genealogies of Pain [Hardcover]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-08-30.
External links[edit]
Official Marilyn Manson website


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)


Navigation menu



Create account
Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















Main page
Contents
Featured content
Current events
Random article
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About Wikipedia
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Recent changes
Contact page

Tools
What links here
Related changes
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Permanent link
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Cite this page

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Printable version

Languages
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Українська
Edit links
This page was last modified on 1 October 2014, at 23:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogies_of_Pain









Holy Wood (novel)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For other uses, see Holy Wood (disambiguation).
Holy Wood
Holywoodbook.jpg
The supposed cover art; posted on the internet by Manson in 2000.

Author
Marilyn Manson
Country
United States
Language
English
Genre
Novel, Satire
Publisher
Unpublished

Publication date
 Unreleased
Preceded by
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell
 (1998)
Followed by
-
Holy Wood is an unpublished novel by Marilyn Manson, written between 1999 and 2000 (although Manson has claimed to have been writing selections since 1995). Initially envisioned as a companion piece to the album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), it remained unreleased after a series of delays, alleged by Manson to have been caused by a "publishing war".[1]


Contents  [hide]
1 Plot
2 Background information 2.1 Early talk of the book and film project
2.2 Cover art and Chapter 10
2.3 After Holy Wood
3 References

Plot[edit]
Describing the plot of the novel itself, Manson said: "The whole story, if you take it from the beginning, is parallel to my own, but just told in metaphors and different symbols that I thought other people could draw from. It's about being innocent and naive, much like Adam was in Paradise before they fall from grace. And seeing something like Hollywood, which I used as a metaphor to represent what people think is the perfect world, and it's about wanting — your whole life — to fit into this world that doesn't think you belong, that doesn't like you, that beats you down every step of the way, fighting and fighting and fighting, and finally getting there, everyone around you are the same people who kept you down in the first place. So you automatically hate everyone around you. You resent them for making you become part of this game you don't realize you were buying into. You trade one prison cell for another in some ways. That becomes the revolution, to be idealistic enough that you think you can change the world, and what you find is you can't change anything but yourself."[2]
Manson has also stated that there is a character "that's very much a take on Walt Disney," who was a big inspiration in the writing of both the book and its accompanying album.[3] In describing the setting, he compared Holy Wood, the place, to Disney World: "I thought of how interesting it would be if we created an entire city that was an amusement park, and the thing we were being amused by was violence and sex and everything that people really want to see."[3]
Background information[edit]
Early talk of the book and film project[edit]
In early June 1999 Manson stated at the MTV Movie Awards that he was writing a film script but refused to be drawn into discussion over its contents.[4] By the next month however it became known[4] that New Line Cinema had approved Holy Wood[4] and that Manson was writing the script with the help of writer Robert Pargi.[4] At the 1999 MTV Europe Music Awards in Dublin, Ireland, on November 11, where the band was slated to perform,[5] Manson revealed to MTV News' John Norris the title of his then-unrevealed film project and his hopes for it "[to] go into production sometime in the next year."[6] Manson also met with Chilean avant-garde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky at the event to discuss the possibility of working on the film. However, no final decision was made.[5][7] Central to the idea was a starring role for Manson's then-fiancée Rose McGowan.
By February 29, 2000, however, the project was postponed as Manson feared the film had been tweaked in ways that would have ruined his artistic vision.[4] Plans were made to first release the album in the autumn and to follow it in 2001 with the novel which Manson called "graphic and phantasmagoric," stemming back to an idea he first began to draft in 1995.[4] The book was a novelized adaptation of the script intended to be released shortly after the record by HarperCollins division ReganBooks.[8] The style was modeled on and inspired by the authors William S. Burroughs, Kurt Vonnegut, Aldous Huxley and Philip K. Dick.[9] The third and final part of the plan was a coffee table book of images related to the novel and the album by Manson and longtime art collaborator P.R. Brown.[4]
Cover art and Chapter 10[edit]
During the promotion of the album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) mid 2000, several secret sister websites were launched containing audio from the album with accompanying images. TheLoveSong.com was one of the first sites to be found and contained a clip of the song "The Love Song" with an image of what looked like the cover of the book. On February 14, 2001, Manson posted a message on his official Bulletin Board System called "They'd Remember 'This As Valentine's Day'". It contained a link which led to an image of Time Magazine dated February 14, 1964; it featured a picture of Marina Oswald on the cover. In the image, a hyperlink on her brooch led to Chapter 10 of the book. This was the only extract of the book released.
Although praised by critics, when the Holy Wood album was finally released it was met with disappointing sales in comparison to Manson's previous albums, taking almost a year to reach gold certification in the US. Talk of the aforementioned film and novel slowly died down in the press.
After Holy Wood[edit]
In spring 2002 Manson began again to mention the novel in various online journal posts; a release date had been set and that the delay was allegedly due to a certain religion's "way". Many assumed this to be about Christianity but in an interview with The Official PlayStation Magazine to promote his appearance as Edgar in Area 51, and other later statements, it became clear the objection most likely originated from the Church of Scientology as Manson, who previously attended meetings but was unimpressed, had drawn upon the story of Jack Parsons and the novel Sex and Rockets for the book.[1]
Manson commented on the novel in November 2005 saying that he would like to release it as either a graphic novel or narrative video game.[10] Chuck Palahniuk has partially read the novel and describes it as "a magical, surreal, poetic story, crammed with detail and cut loose from traditional boring fiction."[11] Magician and friend of Manson, Rudy Coby, revealed in an interview in October 2010 he has made it "one of [his] missions in life to make sure that Holy Wood is released".[12]
“ I will not rest until that is turned into a graphic novel, and then turned into a movie [...] I will NOT rest. [...] But Manson certainly knows that I do not shut up about it. [...] I would like to see a chapter released every other month by an incredible artist/illustrator/whatever.[12] ”
On August 22, 2014, Kurt Sutter held a live chat that featured Manson via Skype. When a viewer asked if the Holy Wood novel will ever be released, Manson said that he would like to do a video mini-series following the story of the book. A release date has not been set.
References[edit]
1.^ Jump up to: a b "Alien Autopsy". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. February 2005. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
2.Jump up ^ Palahniuk, Chuck (Dec 2000/Jan 2001 issue). "Destiny's Child", page 75. Gear magazine
3.^ Jump up to: a b Gargano, Paul (November 2000). "Holy Wars: The Ground Campaign Begins". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media).
4.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Basham, David (2000-02-29). "Marilyn Manson Tweaks "Holy Wood" Plans". MTV News. Retrieved 2011-03-22.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Kara (1999-11-16). "Marilyn Manson Discusses Post-Columbine Shell Shock". MTV News. Retrieved 2011-03-27.
6.Jump up ^ Norris, John (1999-11-24). "'Marilyn Manson To Probe Celebrity And Suffering In New Film, Next Album.". MTV News. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
7.Jump up ^ "Satanic Cult Meeting". NME. 1999-11-16. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
8.Jump up ^ Rushfield, Richard (November 2000). "The Antichrist's Cross". CMJ New Music Monthly (College Media Inc.) (87): 46–51.
9.Jump up ^ McCaughey, Brian (February 2000). "This Is My Holy Wood...". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group).
10.Jump up ^ "Dramatic New Scenes for Celebritarian Needs interview". Mansonusa.com (aka The Heirophant). 2005-11-03. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
11.Jump up ^ Palahniuk, Chuck (Dec 2000/Jan 2001 issue). "Destiny's Child", page 73. Gear Magazine
12.^ Jump up to: a b ""A Three-Minute Act and You Can Tour the World" (Interview with Rudy Coby)". MansonWiki. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2010-11-01.


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: 20th-century American novels
Marilyn Manson (band)
Unpublished novels


Navigation menu



Create account
Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















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Contact page

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What links here
Related changes
Upload file
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Cite this page

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Create a book
Download as PDF
Printable version

Languages
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Edit links
This page was last modified on 4 March 2015, at 04:02.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Wood_(novel)










Holy Wood (novel)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For other uses, see Holy Wood (disambiguation).
Holy Wood
Holywoodbook.jpg
The supposed cover art; posted on the internet by Manson in 2000.

Author
Marilyn Manson
Country
United States
Language
English
Genre
Novel, Satire
Publisher
Unpublished

Publication date
 Unreleased
Preceded by
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell
 (1998)
Followed by
-
Holy Wood is an unpublished novel by Marilyn Manson, written between 1999 and 2000 (although Manson has claimed to have been writing selections since 1995). Initially envisioned as a companion piece to the album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), it remained unreleased after a series of delays, alleged by Manson to have been caused by a "publishing war".[1]


Contents  [hide]
1 Plot
2 Background information 2.1 Early talk of the book and film project
2.2 Cover art and Chapter 10
2.3 After Holy Wood
3 References

Plot[edit]
Describing the plot of the novel itself, Manson said: "The whole story, if you take it from the beginning, is parallel to my own, but just told in metaphors and different symbols that I thought other people could draw from. It's about being innocent and naive, much like Adam was in Paradise before they fall from grace. And seeing something like Hollywood, which I used as a metaphor to represent what people think is the perfect world, and it's about wanting — your whole life — to fit into this world that doesn't think you belong, that doesn't like you, that beats you down every step of the way, fighting and fighting and fighting, and finally getting there, everyone around you are the same people who kept you down in the first place. So you automatically hate everyone around you. You resent them for making you become part of this game you don't realize you were buying into. You trade one prison cell for another in some ways. That becomes the revolution, to be idealistic enough that you think you can change the world, and what you find is you can't change anything but yourself."[2]
Manson has also stated that there is a character "that's very much a take on Walt Disney," who was a big inspiration in the writing of both the book and its accompanying album.[3] In describing the setting, he compared Holy Wood, the place, to Disney World: "I thought of how interesting it would be if we created an entire city that was an amusement park, and the thing we were being amused by was violence and sex and everything that people really want to see."[3]
Background information[edit]
Early talk of the book and film project[edit]
In early June 1999 Manson stated at the MTV Movie Awards that he was writing a film script but refused to be drawn into discussion over its contents.[4] By the next month however it became known[4] that New Line Cinema had approved Holy Wood[4] and that Manson was writing the script with the help of writer Robert Pargi.[4] At the 1999 MTV Europe Music Awards in Dublin, Ireland, on November 11, where the band was slated to perform,[5] Manson revealed to MTV News' John Norris the title of his then-unrevealed film project and his hopes for it "[to] go into production sometime in the next year."[6] Manson also met with Chilean avant-garde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky at the event to discuss the possibility of working on the film. However, no final decision was made.[5][7] Central to the idea was a starring role for Manson's then-fiancée Rose McGowan.
By February 29, 2000, however, the project was postponed as Manson feared the film had been tweaked in ways that would have ruined his artistic vision.[4] Plans were made to first release the album in the autumn and to follow it in 2001 with the novel which Manson called "graphic and phantasmagoric," stemming back to an idea he first began to draft in 1995.[4] The book was a novelized adaptation of the script intended to be released shortly after the record by HarperCollins division ReganBooks.[8] The style was modeled on and inspired by the authors William S. Burroughs, Kurt Vonnegut, Aldous Huxley and Philip K. Dick.[9] The third and final part of the plan was a coffee table book of images related to the novel and the album by Manson and longtime art collaborator P.R. Brown.[4]
Cover art and Chapter 10[edit]
During the promotion of the album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) mid 2000, several secret sister websites were launched containing audio from the album with accompanying images. TheLoveSong.com was one of the first sites to be found and contained a clip of the song "The Love Song" with an image of what looked like the cover of the book. On February 14, 2001, Manson posted a message on his official Bulletin Board System called "They'd Remember 'This As Valentine's Day'". It contained a link which led to an image of Time Magazine dated February 14, 1964; it featured a picture of Marina Oswald on the cover. In the image, a hyperlink on her brooch led to Chapter 10 of the book. This was the only extract of the book released.
Although praised by critics, when the Holy Wood album was finally released it was met with disappointing sales in comparison to Manson's previous albums, taking almost a year to reach gold certification in the US. Talk of the aforementioned film and novel slowly died down in the press.
After Holy Wood[edit]
In spring 2002 Manson began again to mention the novel in various online journal posts; a release date had been set and that the delay was allegedly due to a certain religion's "way". Many assumed this to be about Christianity but in an interview with The Official PlayStation Magazine to promote his appearance as Edgar in Area 51, and other later statements, it became clear the objection most likely originated from the Church of Scientology as Manson, who previously attended meetings but was unimpressed, had drawn upon the story of Jack Parsons and the novel Sex and Rockets for the book.[1]
Manson commented on the novel in November 2005 saying that he would like to release it as either a graphic novel or narrative video game.[10] Chuck Palahniuk has partially read the novel and describes it as "a magical, surreal, poetic story, crammed with detail and cut loose from traditional boring fiction."[11] Magician and friend of Manson, Rudy Coby, revealed in an interview in October 2010 he has made it "one of [his] missions in life to make sure that Holy Wood is released".[12]
“ I will not rest until that is turned into a graphic novel, and then turned into a movie [...] I will NOT rest. [...] But Manson certainly knows that I do not shut up about it. [...] I would like to see a chapter released every other month by an incredible artist/illustrator/whatever.[12] ”
On August 22, 2014, Kurt Sutter held a live chat that featured Manson via Skype. When a viewer asked if the Holy Wood novel will ever be released, Manson said that he would like to do a video mini-series following the story of the book. A release date has not been set.
References[edit]
1.^ Jump up to: a b "Alien Autopsy". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. February 2005. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
2.Jump up ^ Palahniuk, Chuck (Dec 2000/Jan 2001 issue). "Destiny's Child", page 75. Gear magazine
3.^ Jump up to: a b Gargano, Paul (November 2000). "Holy Wars: The Ground Campaign Begins". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media).
4.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Basham, David (2000-02-29). "Marilyn Manson Tweaks "Holy Wood" Plans". MTV News. Retrieved 2011-03-22.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Kara (1999-11-16). "Marilyn Manson Discusses Post-Columbine Shell Shock". MTV News. Retrieved 2011-03-27.
6.Jump up ^ Norris, John (1999-11-24). "'Marilyn Manson To Probe Celebrity And Suffering In New Film, Next Album.". MTV News. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
7.Jump up ^ "Satanic Cult Meeting". NME. 1999-11-16. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
8.Jump up ^ Rushfield, Richard (November 2000). "The Antichrist's Cross". CMJ New Music Monthly (College Media Inc.) (87): 46–51.
9.Jump up ^ McCaughey, Brian (February 2000). "This Is My Holy Wood...". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group).
10.Jump up ^ "Dramatic New Scenes for Celebritarian Needs interview". Mansonusa.com (aka The Heirophant). 2005-11-03. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
11.Jump up ^ Palahniuk, Chuck (Dec 2000/Jan 2001 issue). "Destiny's Child", page 73. Gear Magazine
12.^ Jump up to: a b ""A Three-Minute Act and You Can Tour the World" (Interview with Rudy Coby)". MansonWiki. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2010-11-01.


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: 20th-century American novels
Marilyn Manson (band)
Unpublished novels


Navigation menu



Create account
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Talk









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Printable version

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Edit links
This page was last modified on 4 March 2015, at 04:02.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
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Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Wood_(novel)










The Long Hard Road Out of Hell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the autobiography of Marilyn Manson. For the Marilyn Manson single, see Long Hard Road Out of Hell.
LHROOHcover.jpg
First edition cover

Author
Marilyn Manson
Neil Strauss
Country
United States
Language
English
Genre
Autobiography
Publisher
ReganBooks (HarperCollins)

Publication date
 1998
Media type
Hardcover, paperback
Pages
269
ISBN
978-0-06-039258-1
OCLC
38417510
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell is the autobiography of Marilyn Manson, leader of the American rock band Marilyn Manson. The book was released on February 14, 1998 and written with the help of Neil Strauss (of Rolling Stone Magazine).
It follows Manson's life from when he was a child, born as Brian Hugh Warner, until the events of the band's controversial Dead to the World Tour. It also details his grandfather's sexual fetishes' (including bestiality and sadomasochism) influence to the forming of Marilyn Manson and the Spooky Kids, to the recording of Antichrist Superstar. Its last pages are the journal of the band's touring, documenting backstage events and people's reactions. The book includes many references to his life of drugs, sex and dysfunctional relationships which he attributes as causal to his current status quo. It also features his journalism works, including an article about a dominatrix he interviewed for 25th Parallel.
The autobiography goes in-depth into the break-ups amongst the band's history. It follows several members through becoming friends and musicians with the band to angry and sometimes bitter leavings, some band members detested being fired so badly that lawsuits have been filed against Manson by his own crew members.
Along with the book are numerous pictures, some of which are familiar to long-time Manson fans, with the center pages including everything from the Slasher Girls to Manson performing "Antichrist Superstar" with a Bible in his hand. The book incorporates illustrations from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy, originally drawn by Henry Vandyke Carter. For example, the ribcage in the cover image (which also appears in the liner note artwork for Antichrist Superstar) is taken from Gray's Figure 115. Also scattered throughout the pages are documents of such things as girlfriends, legal documents of claims made by the American Family Association about his shows that were proven to be false,[1][2][3] and band landmarks, to the rarer, such as Manson with Anton Szandor LaVey.
Promotion[edit]
On February 21, 1998, Manson held a two-hour in-store book signing at the San Francisco Virgin Megastore. The event was attended by an estimated 700 fans.[4]
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Ozzy, Slayer Turn Up On "Ozzfest Live"". MTV News. 1997-04-28. Retrieved 2009-07-18.
2.Jump up ^ "Ozzy, Manson File Suit Against Meadowlands". MTV News. 1997-05-02. Retrieved 2009-07-18.
3.Jump up ^ Mikkleson, Barbara (May 15, 2007). "Dead Puppies". Snopes. Retrieved June 14, 2010.
4.Jump up ^ Reiss, Randy (1998-02-23). "Marilyn Manson Presses Flesh At Book Signing". VH1. Retrieved 2011-05-31.


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 




Stub icon This article about a biographical or autobiographical book on musicians is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.




  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)
1998 books
Music autobiographies
HarperCollins books
Musician book stubs




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Read

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Printable version

Languages
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This page was last modified on 16 June 2015, at 03:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
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Powered by MediaWiki
  

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Hard_Road_Out_of_Hell









The Long Hard Road Out of Hell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the autobiography of Marilyn Manson. For the Marilyn Manson single, see Long Hard Road Out of Hell.
LHROOHcover.jpg
First edition cover

Author
Marilyn Manson
Neil Strauss
Country
United States
Language
English
Genre
Autobiography
Publisher
ReganBooks (HarperCollins)

Publication date
 1998
Media type
Hardcover, paperback
Pages
269
ISBN
978-0-06-039258-1
OCLC
38417510
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell is the autobiography of Marilyn Manson, leader of the American rock band Marilyn Manson. The book was released on February 14, 1998 and written with the help of Neil Strauss (of Rolling Stone Magazine).
It follows Manson's life from when he was a child, born as Brian Hugh Warner, until the events of the band's controversial Dead to the World Tour. It also details his grandfather's sexual fetishes' (including bestiality and sadomasochism) influence to the forming of Marilyn Manson and the Spooky Kids, to the recording of Antichrist Superstar. Its last pages are the journal of the band's touring, documenting backstage events and people's reactions. The book includes many references to his life of drugs, sex and dysfunctional relationships which he attributes as causal to his current status quo. It also features his journalism works, including an article about a dominatrix he interviewed for 25th Parallel.
The autobiography goes in-depth into the break-ups amongst the band's history. It follows several members through becoming friends and musicians with the band to angry and sometimes bitter leavings, some band members detested being fired so badly that lawsuits have been filed against Manson by his own crew members.
Along with the book are numerous pictures, some of which are familiar to long-time Manson fans, with the center pages including everything from the Slasher Girls to Manson performing "Antichrist Superstar" with a Bible in his hand. The book incorporates illustrations from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy, originally drawn by Henry Vandyke Carter. For example, the ribcage in the cover image (which also appears in the liner note artwork for Antichrist Superstar) is taken from Gray's Figure 115. Also scattered throughout the pages are documents of such things as girlfriends, legal documents of claims made by the American Family Association about his shows that were proven to be false,[1][2][3] and band landmarks, to the rarer, such as Manson with Anton Szandor LaVey.
Promotion[edit]
On February 21, 1998, Manson held a two-hour in-store book signing at the San Francisco Virgin Megastore. The event was attended by an estimated 700 fans.[4]
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ "Ozzy, Slayer Turn Up On "Ozzfest Live"". MTV News. 1997-04-28. Retrieved 2009-07-18.
2.Jump up ^ "Ozzy, Manson File Suit Against Meadowlands". MTV News. 1997-05-02. Retrieved 2009-07-18.
3.Jump up ^ Mikkleson, Barbara (May 15, 2007). "Dead Puppies". Snopes. Retrieved June 14, 2010.
4.Jump up ^ Reiss, Randy (1998-02-23). "Marilyn Manson Presses Flesh At Book Signing". VH1. Retrieved 2011-05-31.


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 




Stub icon This article about a biographical or autobiographical book on musicians is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.




  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band)
1998 books
Music autobiographies
HarperCollins books
Musician book stubs




Navigation menu



Create account
Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















Main page
Contents
Featured content
Current events
Random article
Donate to Wikipedia
Wikipedia store

Interaction
Help
About Wikipedia
Community portal
Recent changes
Contact page

Tools
What links here
Related changes
Upload file
Special pages
Permanent link
Page information
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Cite this page

Print/export
Create a book
Download as PDF
Printable version

Languages
Español
Français
Italiano
Polski
Português
Русский
Svenska
Українська
Edit links
This page was last modified on 16 June 2015, at 03:37.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
  

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Hard_Road_Out_of_Hell











The Pale Emperor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


The Pale Emperor

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
January 15, 2015
Recorded
May 2013 – September 2014
Studio
Abattoir Studios and Igloo Studios, Los Angeles, California
Genre
Alternative rock[1] ·
 blues rock[2] ·
 hard rock[3]
 
Length
52:00
Label
Hell, etc.
Producer
Marilyn Manson ·
 Tyler Bates
 
Marilyn Manson chronology

Born Villain
 (2012) The Pale Emperor
 (2015) 


Singles from The Pale Emperor
1."Third Day of a Seven Day Binge"
 Released: October 26, 2014
2."Deep Six"
 Released: December 16, 2014
3."Cupid Carries a Gun"
 Released: January 6, 2015
4."The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 Released: May 11, 2015

The Pale Emperor is the ninth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on January 15, 2015 through Marilyn Manson's own Hell, etc. label, with distribution handled in the US by Loma Vista Recordings, Canada by Dine Alone Records, Japan by Victor Entertainment and internationally by Cooking Vinyl. The album was released in standard and deluxe editions on CD and 2×LP vinyl, as well as a "Definitive Box" set. The standard version of the album contains ten tracks, while the deluxe edition includes three acoustic versions as bonus tracks.
Produced by Manson and newcomer Tyler Bates, whom Manson met while acting on the TV series Californication, The Pale Emperor eschews the band's usual industrial rock genre in favor of a more sparse, blues rock-influenced sound. It is the first release since his return in 2008 to not feature writing and performance contributions from Twiggy Ramirez. The album is dedicated to Manson's mother, who died during its production after an eight-year battle with Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
The album was critically and commercially successful upon release, receiving generally favorable reviews from contemporary music critics, with several publications referring to it as his best album in over a decade. It debuted at number eight on the Billboard 200 with the band's highest opening week sales since Eat Me, Drink Me (2007). It also topped the national albums chart in Switzerland, and peaked within the top twenty in over twenty other territories. It has spawned one official single, "Deep Six", which went on to become the band's highest-peaking single ever on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Chart; while "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" and "Cupid Carries a Gun" have been released as promotional singles.
The album is currently being supported by The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour, which will then be followed by a co-headlining tour with The Smashing Pumpkins called The End Times.


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and recording
2 Composition and style
3 Release and artwork
4 Promotion and singles
5 Critical reception
6 Commercial performance
7 Track listing
8 Credits and personnel
9 Charts
10 Release history
11 References
12 External links

Background and recording[edit]
In April 2013, it was announced that Manson was to feature in an episode of the sixth season of TV series Californication,[4] while the following month he also confirmed that production had started on the band's ninth studio album.[5] At Californication's wrap party, Manson met the shows score composer Tyler Bates, who suggested the idea of collaborating.[6] The pair held their first writing session in a small rehearsal space, accompanied by former Slayer drummer Dave Lombardo. This session ultimately proved unsuccessful, with the pair failing to write any substantial material.[6] Bates later suggested that they hold further writing sessions at his home studio, which resulted in them composing "Birds of Hell Awaiting" in "one spontaneous exchange".[6]



"Tyler sat in front of me with his guitar and his amp. We wouldn't talk about what the songs were going to be. I'd say, "Just play, give me the mic, go." Of course we'd elaborate on it later, but for the most part, the guitar and the vocal takes are the original, first take. If I fucked something up or if he fucked something up, we'd start from the beginning and do it together."
—Manson on the recording process of The Pale Emperor.[7]
This was quickly followed by "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge", with Manson saying that the recording of the album "just became a rhythm. This was something I was excited to do." This is in stark contrast to the recording of previous albums The High End of Low (2009) and Born Villain (2012), where he was frequently "dragged into the studio at 3am" to record vocals.[8] He later credited this enthusiasm to the collaborative process between him and Bates, saying that he realized after the first performance of "Birds of Hell Awaiting" that "[I] just sang it. I didn't even know where the music was going to go and I just went with it and it was very organic. And then it opened up a whole different part of my mind."[6]
Bates called the recording process "seamless", attributing this to an unconventional studio environment. Manson, who would be isolated in a vocal booth with no more than three people in the control room at any one time, was free to improvise or develop lyrics and vocal melodies at a high speed. Bates explained that, through his use of Pro Tools, he was able to "manipulate the music in a way that would allow [Manson] to just keep working on it without causing [a delay]. If he had an idea, he could just throw it down without there being a lot to explain."[9] The majority of the album was recorded over a three-month period.[8] The band's manager, Tony Ciulla, only became aware that Manson had been recording new material when he was invited to Bates' home recording studio, where he was played final cuts of nine of the album's ten tracks for the first time,[9] with "Cupid Carries a Gun" being the final track recorded for The Pale Emperor.[10] Further overdubbing took place over the following six months,[6] in between Manson's acting commitments on Sons of Anarchy and Bates scoring the 2014 television series Salem.[8][10]
In early 2014, drummer Gil Sharone of The Dillinger Escape Plan and Stolen Babies revealed that he had been working on the album since November.[11][12] Sharone was first contacted by Bates about the project three days before he was due to begin a tour with Stolen Babies. Expanding over the album's embryonic drum programming, he developed and recorded his drum work over a three-day period[9] at Igloo Studios in Burbank, California.[13] On February 1, Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter confirmed Manson's acting involvement in the show.[14][15] Sutter went on to say that he had written a song with Shooter Jennings, to appear in the final season of the show and feature vocals from Manson.[16] He also suggested that Jennings was involved in the recording of The Pale Emperor,[16] although Jennings' work does not appear on the album.[13] On June 25, bassist Fred Sablan confirmed that he had left the band on good terms.[17] Long-time band member Twiggy did not take part in the writing and recording process,[9][18] as he was busy recording his own album.[19]
During The Pale Emperor sessions, Manson and Bates recorded a cover of David Bowie‍ '​s "Moonage Daydream" for inclusion on the Guardians of the Galaxy OST, a soundtrack which Bates scored. This recording was not utilized in the soundtrack as, according to Manson, Hollywood Records "didn't want it."[20] The original album version by Bowie was used instead.[21] On September 3, Manson confirmed that the new album is "prepared for landing", indicating that production had been completed.[22] The Pale Emperor is dedicated to Manson's late mother, Barbara Warner, who died on May 13, 2014 after an eight-year battle with Alzheimer's disease and dementia.[23][24]
Composition and style[edit]
In a January 2014 interview with Kerrang! magazine, Manson described the sound of the new album as being "very cinematic", saying that the "redneck in me comes out in my voice" due to the album's inclusion of "old blues" influences, while still containing the "harder elements" of previous work.[25] In a later interview with The Fader, Manson stated that he no longer "dresses [his] feelings in characters and extended metaphors", saying that he instead "lets melody lead" the album. He elaborated that he is "a man of few words on the record. What I hadn't ever found, till now, is the blues. The blues changed the way that I sang [on the album]. And the music has a melody and a language in and of itself," while lead editor Naomi Zeichner went on to compare the album to the work of Interpol and "the retro biker bar rock that soundtracks Sons of Anarchy."[26]
The Pale Emperor is a departure from the band's usual style, leaning away from the industrial, electronic, and heavy metal-influenced production that appeared on much of the band's previous work, towards a more sparse, blues, and hard rock-influenced sound,[3][23] with Manson citing the music of Muddy Waters, The Rolling Stones, and The Doors as inspiration.[27] Steven Hyden of Grantland expanded on several parallels between The Pale Emperor and the Doors' 1971 album L.A. Woman, noting how the album "echoes how [the Doors] reformulated its juju in the latter part of its career," likening both Manson and Jim Morrison to "rambling barstool vamp[s] that career darkly between camp and druggy majesty". He went on to compare Manson's vocals on "Warship My Wreck" to Morrison's "debauched howls," and said that Morrison's "self-destructive self-aggrandizement" can be found in tracks such as "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles" and "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge".[28]




"The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"







Album version, as it appeared on The Pale Emperor

Problems playing this file? See media help.
The album's title is inspired by the Roman emperor Constantius I[29] – also known as "Constantius the Pale" – who was the first Roman emperor to deny the existence of a God.[30] Manson has said that the meaning of the album's title can have several interpretations: "complexion or Goth music or 'beyond the pale' or [...] everything pales in comparison to it."[19] Lyrically, the album deals with subjects ranging from mortality,[3] war, violence,[30] slavery and religion,[31] as well as containing references to Greek mythology[32] and German folklore, specifically the story of Faust and Mephistopheles.[28] "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles" was the original title track and, according to Manson, "the album's heart".[33] The album makes use of an extended metaphor, in which Manson compares his own career to the life of Faust, explaining to The Philadelphia Inquirer that he "sold [his] soul to become a rock star, and [The Pale Emperor is] payment in full – with interest, considering the last few bills I didn't pay," explaining that he considered The High End of Low and Born Villain to "lack focus".[27] He elaborated to Classic Rock Magazine:
“ If we stick to the Faust story – if I had been in that story – and I had sold my soul [to the devil] for fame and fortune, and had the arrogance of [Faust] to not want to pay back the deal, it's taken a few years for me to acknowledge to myself that I was hearing: 'Manson [rapping his knuckles on the table], the hell hounds are on your trail.' And this record is my payment. This is me giving back what I was given, or took. Faust and Mephistopheles both exist within me, in that you can't outrun your demons. You've got to deal with them eventually. The evidence is in me acknowledging that I needed to make something that was up to my own expectations, my own rules. If you believe in some mythology, and you want to live by those rules, then I had to say myself: 'I'm not really doing what I set out to do,' even though I tried to convince myself that I was. I'm not regretting the last few records that I've made, but since Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), I've not made something with the sheer utter fearlessness and anger and force [of before].[33] ”
The lyrics for several tracks are intentionally sparse, with Manson explaining that he "[left] holes in these stories so [the album could] become your story. It becomes more cinematic. For example in the film Rosemary's Baby, you don't see the baby but in your mind you do."[32] The lyrics were all derived from a single notebook, with Manson admitting that the lyrical content of previous work was "often too scattered", as they were composed of material taken from "about 20" different notebooks.[34] Vocally, Manson sings in a different key than on any of his previous releases.[35] Manson has claimed that his voice can emit five different tones simultaneously,[30] which mixing engineer Robert Carranza discovered can form a pentagram when imported in to a phrasal analyzer.[19] Bates has said that the vocals on the album are "stripped down," saying that he considered the vocals on previous records to be "overproduced at times."[9]
Release and artwork[edit]
The Pale Emperor was announced for release on Marilyn Manson‍ '​s official website on November 9, 2014.[36] It was released in various formats worldwide from January 15, 2015, including standard and deluxe edition CDs; a heavyweight 180-gram 2×LP vinyl album, available in black, white and a limited edition grey marble-effect,[37][38] the latter of which was exclusive to Hot Topic;[39] and as a digital download, including "full-bandwidth 24-bit" AIFF and WAV format files, which were made available on Qobuz.[40] The vinyl discs were manufactured at Record Technology, Inc. in Camarillo, California using the pressing plant's HQ-180™ system.[41] A digital download of the album was packaged with all LP editions.[41] The standard version of the album contains ten tracks, while the deluxe edition adds three acoustic versions as bonus tracks.[42] CD versions of the album were released on black polycarbonate discs.[43] The discs were sourced by Brian Schuman of Concord Music directly from the same plant where Sony manufactured their first PlayStation discs, and are identical to the kind used by the company in the early 90s.[44] A heat-sensitive thermal texture was also added to the CD, appearing black when first opened but revealing a white pattern when exposed to the heat from a CD player.[45]
The album was also released as a limited edition "Definitive Box" set which was sold exclusively at Manson's webstore. Designed by Manson with Willo Perron and Hassan Rahim, the set included the deluxe CD and white vinyl editions of the album, as well as several exclusive items including: a grey cloth-bound individually numbered collectors box, five lithographs designed by artist Nicholas Cope, a fold-out 24" poster, album sleeves printed on full-color UV-coated stock and a Pale Emperor T-shirt.[41]
Promotion and singles[edit]
Manson premiered "Cupid Carries a Gun" on April 27, 2014, when it was used as the opening theme to the television series Salem.[10][46] A large portion of album track "Killing Strangers" would later be featured in the Keanu Reeves film John Wick, which was released in cinemas on October 24.[47][48] The band performed several new songs live for the first time in October and early November, when they played a handful of concerts around southern California.[49] On Halloween night, the band was joined on stage by Johnny Depp and Ninja from Die Antwoord for a performance of "The Beautiful People" at the Roxy Theatre.[50] On December 5, Manson settled a fifteen-year rift with The Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan, by performing "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" and "Ava Adore" with the band at the Camden Palace Theatre in London.[51]
"Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" was released as the album's first promotional single. The song premiered on BBC Radio 1's Rock Show by Daniel P. Carter on October 26, 2014. Immediately following the broadcast, the song was released for free download on the band's official website,[52] and was later released as a one-track single via music download services on November 10.[53] "Deep Six" was released as the album's official lead single on December 16.[54] A music video for the song, directed by Bart Hess, was released on to YouTube three days later.[55][56] The song debuted at number thirty-three on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Chart on the issue dated December 23, 2014, as the "greatest gainer" that week,[57] before eventually rising to number eight on the chart dated March 14, 2015,[58] becoming the band's highest peaking single ever on the chart.[59] The band began their Hell Not Hallelujah Tour on January 21, 2015,[60][61] and are also confirmed to perform at several music festivals throughout the year, including dates at Soundwave Festival in Australia,[62] Rock am Ring and Rock im Park in Germany from June 5 to June 7, 2015,[63] the Download Festival in the UK on June 14, 2015[64] and Hellfest in France on June 20.[65]
In response to the album leaking online, it was released on streaming site Genius eight days ahead of its official release in the US.[66] "Cupid Carries a Gun" was released as a promo single on January 7, 2015.[67][68] Manson and his father, Hugh Warner, appeared together in the February issue of Paper magazine.[69] Taken by photographer Terry Richardson, the shoot featured the pair wearing identical make-up and contained an explicit shot in which Hugh Warner can be seen fondling his own genitalia.[70] On March 31, it was announced that Marilyn Manson will take part in a co-headlining US tour with The Smashing Pumpkins. The End Times Tour will take place from July 7 in Concord, California and run through until August 8 in Cincinnati, Ohio.[71] On April 12, Tyler Bates announced that he had amicably retired from the band's touring line-up, stating that he helped put the band together with the intention that it could function without him when "pre-existing commitments in the film and television industry would be too demanding to handle responsibly from the road."[72] Rhythm guitarist Paul Wiley will replace Bates on lead guitar for the duration of the tour. On May 11, a music video for "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles", directed by Francesco Carrozzini and featuring a cameo from The Wire and Boardwalk Empire actor Michael Kenneth Williams, was released on to Manson's Vevo account.[73]
Manson will appear on a forthcoming tribute album to Giorgio Moroder curated by Shooter Jennings. He will contribute vocals to a version of David Bowie's "Cat People (Putting Out Fire)".[74] Jennings has confirmed that the album is scheduled for release on July 20.[75]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic 71/100[76]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[77]
The A.V. Club B[78]
Consequence of Sound C[79]
Drowned in Sound 8/10[80]
Kerrang! KKKK [Excellent][81]
Metal Hammer 7/10[82]
NME 6/10[83]
The Quietus Positive[84]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[1]
Slant Magazine 3/5 stars[85]
The Pale Emperor received generally positive reviews from music critics.[7][86][87] At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted mean rating out of 100 to reviews from music critics, the album received an average score of 71, indicating "generally favorable reviews", based on 19 publications.[76] Dean Brown of The Quietus called The Pale Emperor "the best album Manson has put his name to in fifteen years" and said that by writing "memorable, mature songs full of devilishly addictive hooks without trying to relive the past, [the album] breathes new life into Manson's career."[84] In a review for Yahoo! Music, Allan Raible said that The Pale Emperor was "one of the best and most surprising albums Manson has released in a long time," highlighting the album's focus on songcraft instead of shock value.[45] Similarly, Corey Deiterman of Houston Press wrote "The Pale Emperor stands as a triumphant return to the songwriting principles that made him famous in the first place," before summarizing that the album is his strongest set "in years and years" and that Manson's persona has "finally given way to the superior musician that always lived within."[88] Fred Thomas of AllMusic said that the album contains a "decidedly more blues-influenced vein, combining a trademark penchant for lyrical darkness with the most unholy type of biker rock," before summarizing that the shift in musical direction "accomplishes the near-impossible [of] making Marilyn Manson sound even more sinister than before."[77] Drowned in Sound critic Dave Hanratty wrote that Marilyn Manson "has always possessed the ability to write and produce music that can speak at its own compelling length and pitch. Here he unleashes that side of his frayed character for the first time in about 14 years."[80] In a positive review, Kerrang! stated that "the god of fuck trades shock-tastic thrills for something even darker."[81] Mark Orton of Otago Daily Times wrote that "not since Mechanical Animals has Manson put together a selection with such sass, swagger and synergy," stating that the music has "definitely supplanted the image," awarding the album four and a half stars out of five.[89] Jeff Miers of The Buffalo News wrote that "The Pale Emperor is the first thoroughly excellent Manson collection of the post-millennial world. Throughout the album, Manson sounds both inspired and disgusted, which is usually the tightrope he walks when he's doing his best work."[90] Alec Chillingworth of Stereoboard wrote that Manson's ability to "conjure a particular mood remains quite unlike anyone else in music," and said that The Pale Emperor is Manson "climbing back to the creative summit he fell from following Holy Wood. He's never going to top those early albums, but by expanding his palette and finally getting it right, The Pale Emperor reinstates Marilyn Manson as a relevant musical force and an elder statesman of the industrial scene," awarding the album four stars out of five.[91]
Louis Pattison, reviewing for NME, stated that "it's no classic, but perhaps the surprise here is that Manson's music can work without the shock shtick." He also wrote that "the biggest surprise on the new album from the 'God Of Fuck' is that we see more of the real Manson than before."[83] Dan Bogosian of Consequence of Sound was more mixed in his assessment, stating: "A lack of 'oomph' prevents the album from landing a gut punch that would cover all of its flaws. Like an aging boxer, Manson lands jabs and the occasional uppercut, but he never topples his opponent."[79] Similarly, Daniel Sylvester of Exclaim! wrote that The Pale Emperor is "downright ambitious when it wants to be and lazy when it can get away with it."[92]
Commercial performance[edit]
Industry forecasters predicted that The Pale Emperor was on course for a top ten debut on the Billboard 200, with first week sales of around 50,000 units.[93] The album debuted at number eight on the Billboard 200 with over 51,000 copies sold,[94] including 49,000 in "pure" album sales,[95] the band's highest opening week figure since Eat Me, Drink Me debuted at the same position with 88,000 copies in 2007.[96] It became the band's eighth top ten album, and sixth title in a row to reach the region.[95] It also debuted at number six on Billboard's Top Albums Chart[97] – the current equivalent of the previous sales-based Billboard 200 – as well as number three on Top Rock Albums[98] and number one on the Top Hard Rock Albums charts.[99] On its second week, the album dropped to number twenty-four on the Top Albums Chart, selling an additional 12,275 "pure" copies.[100] As of May 2015, the album has sold more than 110,000 "pure" copies in the US.[101] The Pale Emperor also debuted at number four on the Canadian Albums Chart, selling over 5,000 copies on its first week per Nielsen SoundScan.[102]
In Europe, The Pale Emperor debuted on the Russian Albums Chart at number ten on the chart dated January 18, 2015,[103] based on three days of sale on the Russian iTunes, later rising to number two on its first full week of release in the country.[104] The album debuted and peaked at number one on the Swiss Albums Chart, becoming the band's first since The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003) to do so.[105] Similarly, the album debuted at number twenty-one on both the Irish and Dutch Albums Charts, making it the band's highest-peaking album in both regions since The Golden Age of Grotesque.[106][107] The Pale Emperor was Manson's fifth top-ten album in France, where it debuted at number five, selling over 6,700 copies on its first week.[108] In the United Kingdom, it debuted at number sixteen with sales of 5,984 copies, becoming the band's seventh top 20 album.[109][110]
In Japan, the album debuted at number twenty-five on the Oricon albums chart with sales of 3,610 copies.[111] It debuted at number six on the ARIA Albums Chart as the highest new entry that week, and his highest peaking album in the region since The Golden Age of Grotesque.[112] In New Zealand, the album debuted at number five, making it the band's highest peaking album in the country since Mechanical Animals peaked at number three in 1998.[113]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Marilyn Manson, all music composed by Tyler Bates.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Killing Strangers"   5:36
2. "Deep Six"   5:02
3. "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge"   4:26
4. "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"   4:57
5. "Warship My Wreck"   5:57
6. "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"   5:20
7. "The Devil Beneath My Feet"   4:16
8. "Birds of Hell Awaiting"   5:05
9. "Cupid Carries a Gun"   4:59
10. "Odds of Even" (deluxe edition adds 1:30 of silence to the track) 6:22
Total length:
 52:00 

[show]Deluxe edition







  
  
  

  
Credits and personnel[edit]
Recorded at Abattoir Studios, Studio City, California
Drums recorded by Gustavo Borner at Igloo Studios, Burbank, California
Mixed by Robert Carranza and Wolfgang Matthes at SPPP, Los Angeles, California
Mastering by Brian Lucey at Magic Garden Mastering, Los Angeles, California


Primary PersonnelMarilyn Manson – vocals, percussion, keyboards on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King", pill bottle on "Killing Strangers",[114] production
Tyler Bates – guitar, guitar violin, bass guitar, keyboards, programming, production
Gil Sharone – drums
Additional PersonnelRoger Joseph Manning, Jr. – piano on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"
Frank Macchia – baritone and tenor saxophones on "Birds of Hell Awaiting"
Walton Goggins, Jr. – preacher on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"

Technical PersonnelEmma Banks – executive booking agent
Tony Ciulla – management
Nicholas Cope – photography
Chris Daltson – executive booking agent
Dylan Eiland – additional programming
Joanne Higginbottom – Pro Tools editing
Wolfgang Matthes – additional programming
Willo Perron – creative direction
Hassan Rahim – art direction
Rick Roskin – booking agent
Laurie Soriano – legal

Credits adapted from the liner notes of the deluxe edition of The Pale Emperor.[13]
Charts[edit]

Chart (2015)
Peak
 position


Australian Albums (ARIA)[115]
6
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria)[116]
4
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[117]
20
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Wallonia)[118]
5
Canadian Albums (Billboard)[119]
4
Croatian Albums (HDU)[120]
31
Czech Albums (ČNS IFPI)[121]
7
Danish Albums (Hitlisten)[122]
18
Dutch Albums (MegaCharts)[106]
21
Finnish Albums (Suomen virallinen lista)[123]
10
French Albums (SNEP)[124]
5
German Albums (Official Top 100)[125]
4
Greek Albums (IFPI)[126]
8
Hungarian Albums (MAHASZ)[127]
8
Irish Albums (IRMA)[128]
21
Irish Independent Albums (IRMA)[129]
5
Italian Albums (FIMI)[130]
26
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[111]
25
Mexican Albums (AMPROFON)[131]
33
New Zealand Albums (Recorded Music NZ)[132]
5
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[133]
24
Polish Albums (ZPAV)[134]
3
Portuguese Albums (AFP)[135]
10
Russian Albums (2M)[104]
2
Scottish Albums (OCC)[136]
17
Spanish Albums (PROMUSICAE)[137]
15
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[138]
20
Swiss Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[105]
1
UK Albums (OCC)[139]
16
UK Independent Albums (OCC)[140]
6
UK Rock & Metal Albums (OCC)[141]
3
US Billboard 200[142]
8
US Top Album Sales (Billboard)[143]
6
US Top Rock Albums (Billboard)[144]
3
US Top Alternative Albums (Billboard)[145]
3
US Top Hard Rock Albums (Billboard)[146]
1

Release history[edit]

Region
Date
Label
Distributor(s)
Format(s)
Catalog #
Belgium[147] January 15, 2015 Hell, etc. Cooking Vinyl standard CD
deluxe CD
2×LP vinyl
digital download
definitive box set
 COOKCD/LP602[X]
Germany[148] January 16, 2015
Ireland[149]
Italy[150]
France[151] January 19, 2015
Netherlands[152]
Sweden[153]
Norway[154]
United Kingdom[155]
Canada[156] January 20, 2015 Dine Alone Records DA130
United States[157] Loma Vista LVR-36380-02
Japan[158] January 21, 2015 Victor Entertainment VICP-65261
Australia[159] January 23, 2015 Cooking Vinyl COOKCD/LP602[X]
New Zealand[160]
References[edit]
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External links[edit]
The Pale Emperor at Discogs (list of releases)
The Pale Emperor at MusicBrainz (list of releases)
The Pale Emperor (press release) at Concord Music Group


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pale_Emperor









The Pale Emperor

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The Pale Emperor

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
January 15, 2015
Recorded
May 2013 – September 2014
Studio
Abattoir Studios and Igloo Studios, Los Angeles, California
Genre
Alternative rock[1] ·
 blues rock[2] ·
 hard rock[3]
 
Length
52:00
Label
Hell, etc.
Producer
Marilyn Manson ·
 Tyler Bates
 
Marilyn Manson chronology

Born Villain
 (2012) The Pale Emperor
 (2015) 


Singles from The Pale Emperor
1."Third Day of a Seven Day Binge"
 Released: October 26, 2014
2."Deep Six"
 Released: December 16, 2014
3."Cupid Carries a Gun"
 Released: January 6, 2015
4."The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 Released: May 11, 2015

The Pale Emperor is the ninth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on January 15, 2015 through Marilyn Manson's own Hell, etc. label, with distribution handled in the US by Loma Vista Recordings, Canada by Dine Alone Records, Japan by Victor Entertainment and internationally by Cooking Vinyl. The album was released in standard and deluxe editions on CD and 2×LP vinyl, as well as a "Definitive Box" set. The standard version of the album contains ten tracks, while the deluxe edition includes three acoustic versions as bonus tracks.
Produced by Manson and newcomer Tyler Bates, whom Manson met while acting on the TV series Californication, The Pale Emperor eschews the band's usual industrial rock genre in favor of a more sparse, blues rock-influenced sound. It is the first release since his return in 2008 to not feature writing and performance contributions from Twiggy Ramirez. The album is dedicated to Manson's mother, who died during its production after an eight-year battle with Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
The album was critically and commercially successful upon release, receiving generally favorable reviews from contemporary music critics, with several publications referring to it as his best album in over a decade. It debuted at number eight on the Billboard 200 with the band's highest opening week sales since Eat Me, Drink Me (2007). It also topped the national albums chart in Switzerland, and peaked within the top twenty in over twenty other territories. It has spawned one official single, "Deep Six", which went on to become the band's highest-peaking single ever on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Chart; while "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" and "Cupid Carries a Gun" have been released as promotional singles.
The album is currently being supported by The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour, which will then be followed by a co-headlining tour with The Smashing Pumpkins called The End Times.


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and recording
2 Composition and style
3 Release and artwork
4 Promotion and singles
5 Critical reception
6 Commercial performance
7 Track listing
8 Credits and personnel
9 Charts
10 Release history
11 References
12 External links

Background and recording[edit]
In April 2013, it was announced that Manson was to feature in an episode of the sixth season of TV series Californication,[4] while the following month he also confirmed that production had started on the band's ninth studio album.[5] At Californication's wrap party, Manson met the shows score composer Tyler Bates, who suggested the idea of collaborating.[6] The pair held their first writing session in a small rehearsal space, accompanied by former Slayer drummer Dave Lombardo. This session ultimately proved unsuccessful, with the pair failing to write any substantial material.[6] Bates later suggested that they hold further writing sessions at his home studio, which resulted in them composing "Birds of Hell Awaiting" in "one spontaneous exchange".[6]



"Tyler sat in front of me with his guitar and his amp. We wouldn't talk about what the songs were going to be. I'd say, "Just play, give me the mic, go." Of course we'd elaborate on it later, but for the most part, the guitar and the vocal takes are the original, first take. If I fucked something up or if he fucked something up, we'd start from the beginning and do it together."
—Manson on the recording process of The Pale Emperor.[7]
This was quickly followed by "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge", with Manson saying that the recording of the album "just became a rhythm. This was something I was excited to do." This is in stark contrast to the recording of previous albums The High End of Low (2009) and Born Villain (2012), where he was frequently "dragged into the studio at 3am" to record vocals.[8] He later credited this enthusiasm to the collaborative process between him and Bates, saying that he realized after the first performance of "Birds of Hell Awaiting" that "[I] just sang it. I didn't even know where the music was going to go and I just went with it and it was very organic. And then it opened up a whole different part of my mind."[6]
Bates called the recording process "seamless", attributing this to an unconventional studio environment. Manson, who would be isolated in a vocal booth with no more than three people in the control room at any one time, was free to improvise or develop lyrics and vocal melodies at a high speed. Bates explained that, through his use of Pro Tools, he was able to "manipulate the music in a way that would allow [Manson] to just keep working on it without causing [a delay]. If he had an idea, he could just throw it down without there being a lot to explain."[9] The majority of the album was recorded over a three-month period.[8] The band's manager, Tony Ciulla, only became aware that Manson had been recording new material when he was invited to Bates' home recording studio, where he was played final cuts of nine of the album's ten tracks for the first time,[9] with "Cupid Carries a Gun" being the final track recorded for The Pale Emperor.[10] Further overdubbing took place over the following six months,[6] in between Manson's acting commitments on Sons of Anarchy and Bates scoring the 2014 television series Salem.[8][10]
In early 2014, drummer Gil Sharone of The Dillinger Escape Plan and Stolen Babies revealed that he had been working on the album since November.[11][12] Sharone was first contacted by Bates about the project three days before he was due to begin a tour with Stolen Babies. Expanding over the album's embryonic drum programming, he developed and recorded his drum work over a three-day period[9] at Igloo Studios in Burbank, California.[13] On February 1, Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter confirmed Manson's acting involvement in the show.[14][15] Sutter went on to say that he had written a song with Shooter Jennings, to appear in the final season of the show and feature vocals from Manson.[16] He also suggested that Jennings was involved in the recording of The Pale Emperor,[16] although Jennings' work does not appear on the album.[13] On June 25, bassist Fred Sablan confirmed that he had left the band on good terms.[17] Long-time band member Twiggy did not take part in the writing and recording process,[9][18] as he was busy recording his own album.[19]
During The Pale Emperor sessions, Manson and Bates recorded a cover of David Bowie‍ '​s "Moonage Daydream" for inclusion on the Guardians of the Galaxy OST, a soundtrack which Bates scored. This recording was not utilized in the soundtrack as, according to Manson, Hollywood Records "didn't want it."[20] The original album version by Bowie was used instead.[21] On September 3, Manson confirmed that the new album is "prepared for landing", indicating that production had been completed.[22] The Pale Emperor is dedicated to Manson's late mother, Barbara Warner, who died on May 13, 2014 after an eight-year battle with Alzheimer's disease and dementia.[23][24]
Composition and style[edit]
In a January 2014 interview with Kerrang! magazine, Manson described the sound of the new album as being "very cinematic", saying that the "redneck in me comes out in my voice" due to the album's inclusion of "old blues" influences, while still containing the "harder elements" of previous work.[25] In a later interview with The Fader, Manson stated that he no longer "dresses [his] feelings in characters and extended metaphors", saying that he instead "lets melody lead" the album. He elaborated that he is "a man of few words on the record. What I hadn't ever found, till now, is the blues. The blues changed the way that I sang [on the album]. And the music has a melody and a language in and of itself," while lead editor Naomi Zeichner went on to compare the album to the work of Interpol and "the retro biker bar rock that soundtracks Sons of Anarchy."[26]
The Pale Emperor is a departure from the band's usual style, leaning away from the industrial, electronic, and heavy metal-influenced production that appeared on much of the band's previous work, towards a more sparse, blues, and hard rock-influenced sound,[3][23] with Manson citing the music of Muddy Waters, The Rolling Stones, and The Doors as inspiration.[27] Steven Hyden of Grantland expanded on several parallels between The Pale Emperor and the Doors' 1971 album L.A. Woman, noting how the album "echoes how [the Doors] reformulated its juju in the latter part of its career," likening both Manson and Jim Morrison to "rambling barstool vamp[s] that career darkly between camp and druggy majesty". He went on to compare Manson's vocals on "Warship My Wreck" to Morrison's "debauched howls," and said that Morrison's "self-destructive self-aggrandizement" can be found in tracks such as "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles" and "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge".[28]




"The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"







Album version, as it appeared on The Pale Emperor

Problems playing this file? See media help.
The album's title is inspired by the Roman emperor Constantius I[29] – also known as "Constantius the Pale" – who was the first Roman emperor to deny the existence of a God.[30] Manson has said that the meaning of the album's title can have several interpretations: "complexion or Goth music or 'beyond the pale' or [...] everything pales in comparison to it."[19] Lyrically, the album deals with subjects ranging from mortality,[3] war, violence,[30] slavery and religion,[31] as well as containing references to Greek mythology[32] and German folklore, specifically the story of Faust and Mephistopheles.[28] "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles" was the original title track and, according to Manson, "the album's heart".[33] The album makes use of an extended metaphor, in which Manson compares his own career to the life of Faust, explaining to The Philadelphia Inquirer that he "sold [his] soul to become a rock star, and [The Pale Emperor is] payment in full – with interest, considering the last few bills I didn't pay," explaining that he considered The High End of Low and Born Villain to "lack focus".[27] He elaborated to Classic Rock Magazine:
“ If we stick to the Faust story – if I had been in that story – and I had sold my soul [to the devil] for fame and fortune, and had the arrogance of [Faust] to not want to pay back the deal, it's taken a few years for me to acknowledge to myself that I was hearing: 'Manson [rapping his knuckles on the table], the hell hounds are on your trail.' And this record is my payment. This is me giving back what I was given, or took. Faust and Mephistopheles both exist within me, in that you can't outrun your demons. You've got to deal with them eventually. The evidence is in me acknowledging that I needed to make something that was up to my own expectations, my own rules. If you believe in some mythology, and you want to live by those rules, then I had to say myself: 'I'm not really doing what I set out to do,' even though I tried to convince myself that I was. I'm not regretting the last few records that I've made, but since Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), I've not made something with the sheer utter fearlessness and anger and force [of before].[33] ”
The lyrics for several tracks are intentionally sparse, with Manson explaining that he "[left] holes in these stories so [the album could] become your story. It becomes more cinematic. For example in the film Rosemary's Baby, you don't see the baby but in your mind you do."[32] The lyrics were all derived from a single notebook, with Manson admitting that the lyrical content of previous work was "often too scattered", as they were composed of material taken from "about 20" different notebooks.[34] Vocally, Manson sings in a different key than on any of his previous releases.[35] Manson has claimed that his voice can emit five different tones simultaneously,[30] which mixing engineer Robert Carranza discovered can form a pentagram when imported in to a phrasal analyzer.[19] Bates has said that the vocals on the album are "stripped down," saying that he considered the vocals on previous records to be "overproduced at times."[9]
Release and artwork[edit]
The Pale Emperor was announced for release on Marilyn Manson‍ '​s official website on November 9, 2014.[36] It was released in various formats worldwide from January 15, 2015, including standard and deluxe edition CDs; a heavyweight 180-gram 2×LP vinyl album, available in black, white and a limited edition grey marble-effect,[37][38] the latter of which was exclusive to Hot Topic;[39] and as a digital download, including "full-bandwidth 24-bit" AIFF and WAV format files, which were made available on Qobuz.[40] The vinyl discs were manufactured at Record Technology, Inc. in Camarillo, California using the pressing plant's HQ-180™ system.[41] A digital download of the album was packaged with all LP editions.[41] The standard version of the album contains ten tracks, while the deluxe edition adds three acoustic versions as bonus tracks.[42] CD versions of the album were released on black polycarbonate discs.[43] The discs were sourced by Brian Schuman of Concord Music directly from the same plant where Sony manufactured their first PlayStation discs, and are identical to the kind used by the company in the early 90s.[44] A heat-sensitive thermal texture was also added to the CD, appearing black when first opened but revealing a white pattern when exposed to the heat from a CD player.[45]
The album was also released as a limited edition "Definitive Box" set which was sold exclusively at Manson's webstore. Designed by Manson with Willo Perron and Hassan Rahim, the set included the deluxe CD and white vinyl editions of the album, as well as several exclusive items including: a grey cloth-bound individually numbered collectors box, five lithographs designed by artist Nicholas Cope, a fold-out 24" poster, album sleeves printed on full-color UV-coated stock and a Pale Emperor T-shirt.[41]
Promotion and singles[edit]
Manson premiered "Cupid Carries a Gun" on April 27, 2014, when it was used as the opening theme to the television series Salem.[10][46] A large portion of album track "Killing Strangers" would later be featured in the Keanu Reeves film John Wick, which was released in cinemas on October 24.[47][48] The band performed several new songs live for the first time in October and early November, when they played a handful of concerts around southern California.[49] On Halloween night, the band was joined on stage by Johnny Depp and Ninja from Die Antwoord for a performance of "The Beautiful People" at the Roxy Theatre.[50] On December 5, Manson settled a fifteen-year rift with The Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan, by performing "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" and "Ava Adore" with the band at the Camden Palace Theatre in London.[51]
"Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" was released as the album's first promotional single. The song premiered on BBC Radio 1's Rock Show by Daniel P. Carter on October 26, 2014. Immediately following the broadcast, the song was released for free download on the band's official website,[52] and was later released as a one-track single via music download services on November 10.[53] "Deep Six" was released as the album's official lead single on December 16.[54] A music video for the song, directed by Bart Hess, was released on to YouTube three days later.[55][56] The song debuted at number thirty-three on Billboard's Mainstream Rock Chart on the issue dated December 23, 2014, as the "greatest gainer" that week,[57] before eventually rising to number eight on the chart dated March 14, 2015,[58] becoming the band's highest peaking single ever on the chart.[59] The band began their Hell Not Hallelujah Tour on January 21, 2015,[60][61] and are also confirmed to perform at several music festivals throughout the year, including dates at Soundwave Festival in Australia,[62] Rock am Ring and Rock im Park in Germany from June 5 to June 7, 2015,[63] the Download Festival in the UK on June 14, 2015[64] and Hellfest in France on June 20.[65]
In response to the album leaking online, it was released on streaming site Genius eight days ahead of its official release in the US.[66] "Cupid Carries a Gun" was released as a promo single on January 7, 2015.[67][68] Manson and his father, Hugh Warner, appeared together in the February issue of Paper magazine.[69] Taken by photographer Terry Richardson, the shoot featured the pair wearing identical make-up and contained an explicit shot in which Hugh Warner can be seen fondling his own genitalia.[70] On March 31, it was announced that Marilyn Manson will take part in a co-headlining US tour with The Smashing Pumpkins. The End Times Tour will take place from July 7 in Concord, California and run through until August 8 in Cincinnati, Ohio.[71] On April 12, Tyler Bates announced that he had amicably retired from the band's touring line-up, stating that he helped put the band together with the intention that it could function without him when "pre-existing commitments in the film and television industry would be too demanding to handle responsibly from the road."[72] Rhythm guitarist Paul Wiley will replace Bates on lead guitar for the duration of the tour. On May 11, a music video for "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles", directed by Francesco Carrozzini and featuring a cameo from The Wire and Boardwalk Empire actor Michael Kenneth Williams, was released on to Manson's Vevo account.[73]
Manson will appear on a forthcoming tribute album to Giorgio Moroder curated by Shooter Jennings. He will contribute vocals to a version of David Bowie's "Cat People (Putting Out Fire)".[74] Jennings has confirmed that the album is scheduled for release on July 20.[75]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic 71/100[76]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[77]
The A.V. Club B[78]
Consequence of Sound C[79]
Drowned in Sound 8/10[80]
Kerrang! KKKK [Excellent][81]
Metal Hammer 7/10[82]
NME 6/10[83]
The Quietus Positive[84]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[1]
Slant Magazine 3/5 stars[85]
The Pale Emperor received generally positive reviews from music critics.[7][86][87] At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted mean rating out of 100 to reviews from music critics, the album received an average score of 71, indicating "generally favorable reviews", based on 19 publications.[76] Dean Brown of The Quietus called The Pale Emperor "the best album Manson has put his name to in fifteen years" and said that by writing "memorable, mature songs full of devilishly addictive hooks without trying to relive the past, [the album] breathes new life into Manson's career."[84] In a review for Yahoo! Music, Allan Raible said that The Pale Emperor was "one of the best and most surprising albums Manson has released in a long time," highlighting the album's focus on songcraft instead of shock value.[45] Similarly, Corey Deiterman of Houston Press wrote "The Pale Emperor stands as a triumphant return to the songwriting principles that made him famous in the first place," before summarizing that the album is his strongest set "in years and years" and that Manson's persona has "finally given way to the superior musician that always lived within."[88] Fred Thomas of AllMusic said that the album contains a "decidedly more blues-influenced vein, combining a trademark penchant for lyrical darkness with the most unholy type of biker rock," before summarizing that the shift in musical direction "accomplishes the near-impossible [of] making Marilyn Manson sound even more sinister than before."[77] Drowned in Sound critic Dave Hanratty wrote that Marilyn Manson "has always possessed the ability to write and produce music that can speak at its own compelling length and pitch. Here he unleashes that side of his frayed character for the first time in about 14 years."[80] In a positive review, Kerrang! stated that "the god of fuck trades shock-tastic thrills for something even darker."[81] Mark Orton of Otago Daily Times wrote that "not since Mechanical Animals has Manson put together a selection with such sass, swagger and synergy," stating that the music has "definitely supplanted the image," awarding the album four and a half stars out of five.[89] Jeff Miers of The Buffalo News wrote that "The Pale Emperor is the first thoroughly excellent Manson collection of the post-millennial world. Throughout the album, Manson sounds both inspired and disgusted, which is usually the tightrope he walks when he's doing his best work."[90] Alec Chillingworth of Stereoboard wrote that Manson's ability to "conjure a particular mood remains quite unlike anyone else in music," and said that The Pale Emperor is Manson "climbing back to the creative summit he fell from following Holy Wood. He's never going to top those early albums, but by expanding his palette and finally getting it right, The Pale Emperor reinstates Marilyn Manson as a relevant musical force and an elder statesman of the industrial scene," awarding the album four stars out of five.[91]
Louis Pattison, reviewing for NME, stated that "it's no classic, but perhaps the surprise here is that Manson's music can work without the shock shtick." He also wrote that "the biggest surprise on the new album from the 'God Of Fuck' is that we see more of the real Manson than before."[83] Dan Bogosian of Consequence of Sound was more mixed in his assessment, stating: "A lack of 'oomph' prevents the album from landing a gut punch that would cover all of its flaws. Like an aging boxer, Manson lands jabs and the occasional uppercut, but he never topples his opponent."[79] Similarly, Daniel Sylvester of Exclaim! wrote that The Pale Emperor is "downright ambitious when it wants to be and lazy when it can get away with it."[92]
Commercial performance[edit]
Industry forecasters predicted that The Pale Emperor was on course for a top ten debut on the Billboard 200, with first week sales of around 50,000 units.[93] The album debuted at number eight on the Billboard 200 with over 51,000 copies sold,[94] including 49,000 in "pure" album sales,[95] the band's highest opening week figure since Eat Me, Drink Me debuted at the same position with 88,000 copies in 2007.[96] It became the band's eighth top ten album, and sixth title in a row to reach the region.[95] It also debuted at number six on Billboard's Top Albums Chart[97] – the current equivalent of the previous sales-based Billboard 200 – as well as number three on Top Rock Albums[98] and number one on the Top Hard Rock Albums charts.[99] On its second week, the album dropped to number twenty-four on the Top Albums Chart, selling an additional 12,275 "pure" copies.[100] As of May 2015, the album has sold more than 110,000 "pure" copies in the US.[101] The Pale Emperor also debuted at number four on the Canadian Albums Chart, selling over 5,000 copies on its first week per Nielsen SoundScan.[102]
In Europe, The Pale Emperor debuted on the Russian Albums Chart at number ten on the chart dated January 18, 2015,[103] based on three days of sale on the Russian iTunes, later rising to number two on its first full week of release in the country.[104] The album debuted and peaked at number one on the Swiss Albums Chart, becoming the band's first since The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003) to do so.[105] Similarly, the album debuted at number twenty-one on both the Irish and Dutch Albums Charts, making it the band's highest-peaking album in both regions since The Golden Age of Grotesque.[106][107] The Pale Emperor was Manson's fifth top-ten album in France, where it debuted at number five, selling over 6,700 copies on its first week.[108] In the United Kingdom, it debuted at number sixteen with sales of 5,984 copies, becoming the band's seventh top 20 album.[109][110]
In Japan, the album debuted at number twenty-five on the Oricon albums chart with sales of 3,610 copies.[111] It debuted at number six on the ARIA Albums Chart as the highest new entry that week, and his highest peaking album in the region since The Golden Age of Grotesque.[112] In New Zealand, the album debuted at number five, making it the band's highest peaking album in the country since Mechanical Animals peaked at number three in 1998.[113]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Marilyn Manson, all music composed by Tyler Bates.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Killing Strangers"   5:36
2. "Deep Six"   5:02
3. "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge"   4:26
4. "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"   4:57
5. "Warship My Wreck"   5:57
6. "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"   5:20
7. "The Devil Beneath My Feet"   4:16
8. "Birds of Hell Awaiting"   5:05
9. "Cupid Carries a Gun"   4:59
10. "Odds of Even" (deluxe edition adds 1:30 of silence to the track) 6:22
Total length:
 52:00 

[show]Deluxe edition







  
  
  

  
Credits and personnel[edit]
Recorded at Abattoir Studios, Studio City, California
Drums recorded by Gustavo Borner at Igloo Studios, Burbank, California
Mixed by Robert Carranza and Wolfgang Matthes at SPPP, Los Angeles, California
Mastering by Brian Lucey at Magic Garden Mastering, Los Angeles, California


Primary PersonnelMarilyn Manson – vocals, percussion, keyboards on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King", pill bottle on "Killing Strangers",[114] production
Tyler Bates – guitar, guitar violin, bass guitar, keyboards, programming, production
Gil Sharone – drums
Additional PersonnelRoger Joseph Manning, Jr. – piano on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"
Frank Macchia – baritone and tenor saxophones on "Birds of Hell Awaiting"
Walton Goggins, Jr. – preacher on "Slave Only Dreams to Be King"

Technical PersonnelEmma Banks – executive booking agent
Tony Ciulla – management
Nicholas Cope – photography
Chris Daltson – executive booking agent
Dylan Eiland – additional programming
Joanne Higginbottom – Pro Tools editing
Wolfgang Matthes – additional programming
Willo Perron – creative direction
Hassan Rahim – art direction
Rick Roskin – booking agent
Laurie Soriano – legal

Credits adapted from the liner notes of the deluxe edition of The Pale Emperor.[13]
Charts[edit]

Chart (2015)
Peak
 position


Australian Albums (ARIA)[115]
6
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria)[116]
4
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[117]
20
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Wallonia)[118]
5
Canadian Albums (Billboard)[119]
4
Croatian Albums (HDU)[120]
31
Czech Albums (ČNS IFPI)[121]
7
Danish Albums (Hitlisten)[122]
18
Dutch Albums (MegaCharts)[106]
21
Finnish Albums (Suomen virallinen lista)[123]
10
French Albums (SNEP)[124]
5
German Albums (Official Top 100)[125]
4
Greek Albums (IFPI)[126]
8
Hungarian Albums (MAHASZ)[127]
8
Irish Albums (IRMA)[128]
21
Irish Independent Albums (IRMA)[129]
5
Italian Albums (FIMI)[130]
26
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[111]
25
Mexican Albums (AMPROFON)[131]
33
New Zealand Albums (Recorded Music NZ)[132]
5
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[133]
24
Polish Albums (ZPAV)[134]
3
Portuguese Albums (AFP)[135]
10
Russian Albums (2M)[104]
2
Scottish Albums (OCC)[136]
17
Spanish Albums (PROMUSICAE)[137]
15
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[138]
20
Swiss Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[105]
1
UK Albums (OCC)[139]
16
UK Independent Albums (OCC)[140]
6
UK Rock & Metal Albums (OCC)[141]
3
US Billboard 200[142]
8
US Top Album Sales (Billboard)[143]
6
US Top Rock Albums (Billboard)[144]
3
US Top Alternative Albums (Billboard)[145]
3
US Top Hard Rock Albums (Billboard)[146]
1

Release history[edit]

Region
Date
Label
Distributor(s)
Format(s)
Catalog #
Belgium[147] January 15, 2015 Hell, etc. Cooking Vinyl standard CD
deluxe CD
2×LP vinyl
digital download
definitive box set
 COOKCD/LP602[X]
Germany[148] January 16, 2015
Ireland[149]
Italy[150]
France[151] January 19, 2015
Netherlands[152]
Sweden[153]
Norway[154]
United Kingdom[155]
Canada[156] January 20, 2015 Dine Alone Records DA130
United States[157] Loma Vista LVR-36380-02
Japan[158] January 21, 2015 Victor Entertainment VICP-65261
Australia[159] January 23, 2015 Cooking Vinyl COOKCD/LP602[X]
New Zealand[160]
References[edit]
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86.Jump up ^ Sosa, Chris (February 2, 2015). "Marilyn Manson Just Made an Unexpected Comeback". The Huffington Post. AOL Music. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
87.Jump up ^ Symkus, Ed (January 22, 2015). "Sounds Around Town: Marilyn Manson, 'The Pale Emperor'". The Milford Daily News. GateHouse Media. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
88.Jump up ^ Deiterman, Corey (January 14, 2015). "The New Marilyn Manson Is Shockingly Good". Houston Press. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
89.Jump up ^ Orton, Mark (January 26, 2015). "CD reviews: Marilyn Manson". Otago Daily Times. Allied Press. Retrieved February 3, 2014.
90.Jump up ^ Miers, Jeff (January 14, 2015). "Disc review: Marilyn Manson, 'The Pale Emperor'". The Buffalo News. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
91.Jump up ^ Chillingworth, Alec (January 19, 2015). "Marilyn Manson - The Pale Emperor (Album Review)". Stereoboard.com. Retrieved February 3, 2015.
92.Jump up ^ Sylvester, Daniel (January 16, 2015). "Marilyn Manson - The Pale Emperor". Exclaim!. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
93.Jump up ^ Caulfield, Keith (January 23, 2015). "Joey Bada$$ Set for Top 10 Debut on Billboard 200 Albums Chart". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
94.Jump up ^ Lynch, Joe (January 28, 2015). "Who Says Rock Is Dead? Marilyn Manson, Fall Out Boy & More Notch Big Debuts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
95.^ Jump up to: a b Caulfield, Keith (January 28, 2015). "Fall Out Boy Scores Third No. 1 Album on Billboard 200". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
96.Jump up ^ Hasty, Katie (June 13, 2007). "T-Pain Soars To No. 1 Ahead Of Rihanna, McCartney". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
97.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Chart History - Top Album Sales". Billboard Top Album Sales for Marilyn Manson. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
98.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Album & Song Chart History". Billboard Top Rock Albums for Marilyn Manson. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
99.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Album & Song Chart History". Billboard Top Hard Rock Albums for Marilyn Manson. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
100.Jump up ^ Brown, Matt (February 4, 2015). "Metal By Numbers 2/4: Fear of the Chart". Metal Insider. Retrieved February 6, 2015.
101.Jump up ^ Brown, Matt (May 7, 2015). "Metal By Numbers: 5/7: Meanwhile on the charts...". MetalInsider.net. Retrieved May 7, 2015.
102.Jump up ^ Tuch, Paul (January 29, 2015). "The Insighter - January 29, 2015: With six debuts in the top 10...". The Insighter. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
103.Jump up ^ "Новый альбом The Prodigy стартовал со второй строчки в российских чартах iTunes" [The Prodigy's new album opens at No. 2 on the Russian Charts]. Lenta.ru (in Russian). January 20, 2015. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
104.^ Jump up to: a b "Новый альбом Бьорк попал в российские чарты iTunes" [Björk's new album hit the charts in Russian iTunes]. Lenta.ru (in Russian). January 26, 2015. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
105.^ Jump up to: a b "Die Offizielle Schweizer Hitparade und Music Community". Hung Medien (in German). Retrieved January 28, 2015.
106.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson - The Pale Emperor". Dutchcharts.nl (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
107.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - The Pale Emperor". Irish-charts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
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109.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Artist - Official Charts". The Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
110.Jump up ^ Jones, Alan (January 26, 2015). "Official Charts Analysis: Ronson first artist to top singles and albums charts since 2013". Music Week (Dave Roberts). Retrieved January 26, 2015. (subscription required (help)).
111.^ Jump up to: a b "オリコン週間 CDアルバムランキング 2015年01月19日~2015年01月25日 21~30位" [Oricon weekly CD album index January 19, 2015 - January 25, 2015 - places 21~30]. Oricon (in Japanese). Archived from the original on January 28, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
112.Jump up ^ Ryan, Gavin (January 31, 2015). "ARIA Albums: Taylor Swift 1989 Spends 8th Week On Top". Noise11. Retrieved January 31, 2015.
113.Jump up ^ "charts.org.nz - Discography Marilyn Manson". Hung Medien. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
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115.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Australiancharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
116.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor" (in German). Austriancharts.at. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
117.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor" (in Dutch). Ultratop.be. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
118.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor" (in French). Ultratop.be. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
119.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Canadian Albums Chart for Marilyn Manson. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
120.Jump up ^ "Top Kombiniranih – Tjedan 5. 2015." [Top Combined – Week 5. 2015.] (in Croatian). Hrvatska Diskografska Udruga. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
121.Jump up ^ "Czech Albums – Top 100". ČNS IFPI. Note: On the chart page, select 201505 on the field besides the word "Zobrazit", and then click over the word to retrieve the correct chart data. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
122.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Danishcharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
123.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: The Pale Emperor" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
124.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Lescharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 31, 2015.
125.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Officialcharts.de. GfK Entertainment. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
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129.Jump up ^ "Top 10 Independent Artist Album, Week Ending 22 January 2015". Chart-Track. Irish Recorded Music Association. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
130.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Italiancharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved February 3, 2015.
131.Jump up ^ "The Pale Emperor de @marilynmanson puesto #33...". AMPROFON (in Spanish). Twitter. March 4, 2015. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
132.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Charts.org.nz. Hung Medien. Retrieved February 3, 2015.
133.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Norwegiancharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
134.Jump up ^ "Oficjalna lista sprzedaży :: OLIS - Official Retail Sales Chart". OLiS. Polish Society of the Phonographic Industry. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
135.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Portuguesecharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
136.Jump up ^ "2015-01-31 Top 40 Scottish Albums Archive". Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
137.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Spanishcharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
138.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – The Pale Emperor". Swedishcharts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved January 22, 2015.
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144.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Top Rock Albums for Marilyn Manson. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
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External links[edit]
The Pale Emperor at Discogs (list of releases)
The Pale Emperor at MusicBrainz (list of releases)
The Pale Emperor (press release) at Concord Music Group


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Smells Like Children

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Smells Like Children

EP by Marilyn Manson

Released
October 24, 1995
Recorded
1994–1995
Nothing Studios
(New Orleans)
Genre
Shock Rock, industrial rock experimental
Length
54:43
Label
Nothing/Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor
Marilyn Manson chronology

Portrait of an American Family
 (1994) Smells Like Children
 (1995) Antichrist Superstar
 (1996)


Singles from Smells Like Children
1."Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)"
 Released: June 22, 1996

Smells Like Children is an EP by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on October 24, 1995 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. It was produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. The release represents an era of the band full of drugs, abuses, tours, sound experiments, and is also a reference to the villain "The Child Catcher" from the 1968 musical film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
The release was initially proposed to strictly be a remix single for "Dope Hat", but various contributions by engineer and Skinny Puppy producer Dave Ogilvie, Nine Inch Nails live keyboardist Charlie Clouser and new material by the band resulted in an eclectic and unusual combination of material. All the ideas and tracks for this album were created and composed throughout the touring cycle in support of Portrait of an American Family, and is the first Marilyn Manson work that features longtime members Twiggy Ramirez on bass, and Ginger Fish on drums.
The album was certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).[1] Spearheaded by its sole single, a cover of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", originally written and performed by Eurythmics in 1983, the song became a staple on MTV and helped to establish the band in the mainstream.


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and development
2 Themes
3 Music 3.1 Songs
3.2 Samples
4 Release 4.1 Singles
5 Reception 5.1 Critical reception
6 Smells Like Children Tour
7 Track listing
8 Charts and certifications 8.1 Album charts
8.2 Certifications
8.3 Singles
9 Credits and personnel
10 References

Background and development[edit]
After the conclusion of the Portrait of an American Family Tour, the band undertook the opening slot position for Danzig's 4p Tour from March 24, 1995 until May 14, 1995. During their tenure, Danzig/Pantera tour bus driver Tony F. Wiggins befriended Marilyn Manson, bassist Twiggy Ramirez and keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy and went on backstage drug binges, perverse acts and other unusual escapades with them.[2]
The most well-known and notorious of Wiggins-related events was a series of backstage makeshift torture, interviews and confessions administered by himself, Manson, Ramirez and Gacy to disturbed, emotionally unstable and otherwise strange individuals who were both strangers and Marilyn Manson fans alike.[3]
After the tour ended, mention of Wiggins or any affiliation of with him was unknown. Manson later described him as "a vacuum cleaner for sin,"[4] and claims him to be indirectly responsible for his own disappearing innocence and human emotions on the road.[5] The current condition of their relationship is at best, a crucial part of Marilyn Manson history.
Themes[edit]
The band's frontman has discussed his thoughts in retrospect on Smells Like Children within his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell, circa 1998:
“ It was a perfect preface to an album about abuse: sexual abuse, domestic abuse, drug abuse, psychological abuse. Midway through the record, we [initially] included one of the taped confessions we had gathered, from a girl who molested her seven-year-old male cousin. It underscored the subplot of the album, about the most common target of abuse: innocence. I've always liked the Peter Pan idea of being a kid in mind if not in body, and Smells Like Children was supposed to be a record for someone who's no longer a child, someone who, like myself, wants their innocence back now that they're corrupted enough to appreciate it. [...] What began as a very disturbing record had become a record that disturbed only me.[6] ”
Manson has considered the release to be "An album that looks like an album for children that is not for children"; in fact, on the outer rim of the CD label the printed words "Keep this and all drugs away from small children" are visible.
Music[edit]
Songs[edit]
A number of cover songs are included in the track listing, most famous of which is the band's cover of Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", which helped to skyrocket the band into the mainstream. The other covers on the album are the Patti Smith song "Rock N Roll Nigger" and Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You", with the latter later featured on the soundtrack for David Lynch's 1997 psychological thriller film Lost Highway.
A recorded telephone conversation between Manson's mother and grandmother, titled "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces", is sometimes included on early bootlegs under the title "Procardia", in a heavily modified version which is actually a fan-made track, and not an actual track from either pressing—this version contains the original track in the left channel, and an extract from Raggedy Ann in the right. The Smells Like Children version was previously featured as part of the sound scape "Revelation #9", released on the single for "Get Your Gunn". Some of these bootlegs may also contain bonus tracks, including a demo for the song "My Monkey" from Portrait of an American Family, and another track called "Choklit Factory" taken from the bands' Spooky Kids-era.





"Diary of a Dope Fiend"







Album version, as it appeared on Smells Like Children. The title alludes to occult author Aleister Crowley's novel Diary of a Drug Fiend.

Problems playing this file? See media help.
The album alludes to famous occult author Aleister Crowley, particularly in the "Dope Hat" re-recording "Diary of a Dope Fiend" after the Crowley novel Diary of a Drug Fiend. The "Frankie" referred to in "Fuck Frankie" is Frankie Proia, Manson's tour manager at the time who embezzled $20,000 from the band during their tour for their previous release, Portrait of an American Family.[6] Wiggins recorded an acoustic rendition of the song "Cake and Sodomy" under the title "White Trash". Manson stated the irony of having Wiggins "strum and twang a redneck version" of the song was "perfect for its message, since [it] critiques southern Christian white trash".[6]
The "One-Legged..." referred to in "Dancing with the One-Legged..." was "a battered doll of Huggy Bear, the pimp from the 1970s cop thriller television series, Starsky and Hutch, which was missing a leg". Manson explains, "Inside that empty plastic socket was where we hid our drugs throughout the Tony Wiggins tour. Whenever we ingested the contents of that extra orifice, we referred to it in code as 'dancing with the one-legged pimp'".[6] The untitled sixteenth track contains a slower, more ominous remix of "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang" and, approximately 6 minutes in, an unusual audio experiment sometimes referred to as "Poop Games."
Samples[edit]



"The only solace was that through some unfortunate error someone at the record pressing plant made several thousand copies of our original version of the album, thinking it was the new one. Without even listening to them, the record company sent them out as promotional copies to radio stations and journalists before realizing their mistake. Now, they are available to anyone who wants to hear them on the Internet. Though someone at the label actually accused me of plotting it, I wish I was that resourceful. God, however irrelevant he may be to me, works in mysterious ways."[6]
—Marilyn Manson discussing the state of the removed tracks
Early promotional copies of Smells Like Children featured unauthorized samples from the films Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, as well as other sound bites considered "too extreme", therefore resulting in the tracklisting to be re-edited accordingly for public release, much to Manson's chagrin.[6] Interscope was not interested in buying licenses to use the film samples and demanded written affidavits from the participants in the sound bites, certifying their consent to be recorded.[6] The removed clips were the original opening track,"Abuse, Part 1 (There is Pain Involved)", featuring the voices of Manson and Wiggins as they attempted to calm down a masochistic girl when things got rather out-of-hand,[7] and "Abuse, Part 2 (Confessions)", featuring an interview with a teenage girl who confesses to molesting her 7-year-old male cousin.[6] These were replaced by "The Hands of Small Children" and "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces", respectively.
The tracks "Sympathy for the Parents" and "Dancing with the One-Legged..." are distorted sound clips taken from an appearance by Manson, Ramirez and Gacy on The Phil Donahue Show.[8] The episode discussed the dangers of moshing at concerts. The excerpt used in "Sympathy for the Parents" features Ramirez responding to a question about the attire worn by the band members by playing a cassette tape recording of "Scabs, Guns and Peanut Butter," before Manson's answer to the same question.
Release[edit]
Singles[edit]



Marilyn Manson in the music video for "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)"
Smells Like Children was anchored by only one single, a cover version of Eurythmics 1983 hit "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)".
Manson often drew musical inspiration from his dreams, but the idea to cover this song came from his first experimentation with LSD at a house party, according to his autobiography. He says that he hallucinated a "slower, meaner" version of the dance hit playing, sung in his voice.[9] He also stated that Nothing did not want to release this as a single. Daisy Berkowitz stated "When the song was released it divided people – they loved it or hated it. This was good. Just like us, as a band, if loved – you’re loved. If hated, people that hate you talk about you even more so".[10] They wanted to release their cover of Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You", which, according to Manson, "was far too dark, sprawling and esoteric, even for some of our fans."[6]
The music video for Manson's cover was a gateway to popularity for the band, eventually being nominated at the MTV Video Music Awards for Best Rock Video, and contains several clips of Manson and band members in what appears to be an old, decrepit asylum whilst wearing a variety of strange costumes. The overall video was shot with unusual filters: this was one of the first videos shot with director Dean Karr's initial vision intact, not based solely on whatever ideas the band had come up with prior. In between these clips are a number of surreal shots of Manson wearing a wedding gown, Manson wandering around an abandoned street in a tutu, birds fluttering around him and leaving dropping on his body, and footage of him riding a pig wearing a cowboy hat whilst covered with mud which Manson rides during the song's climax.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[11]
Entertainment Weekly (D)[12]
The Village Voice D+[13]
Upon its release, the album met with mixed to negative reviews from music critics. allmusic gave it a mixed review and said: "Where the full-length debut showed sparks of character and invention beneath industrial metal sludge, Smells Like Children is a smartly crafted horror show, filled with vulgarity, ugliness, goth freaks, and sideshow scares. Manson wisely chose to heighten his cartoonish personality with the EP. Most of the record is devoted to spoken words and samples, all designed to push the outrage buttons of middle America. Musically, it may not amount to much—it's goth-metal-industrial, as good as the "Dope Hat," "Lunchbox," and "Cake and Sodomy" trilogy that distinguished the debut—but as a sonic sculpture, as an objet d'art, it's effective and wickedly fascinating. It's exactly what Brian Warner needed to do to establish Marilyn Manson as America's bogeyman for the late '90s."[11]
In his review for The Village Voice, music critic Robert Christgau defined Smells Like Children as an "Unmitigated consumer fraud—a mess of instrumentals, covers, and remixes designed to exploit its well-publicized tour, genderfuck cover art, titillating titles, and parental warning label. The lyrics to "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang" are nonexistent, those to "Everlasting Cocksucker" incomprehensible. Only "Fuck Frankie," a spoken-word number in which a female feigning sexual ecstasy reveals that it isn't "Fool Frankie" or "Fire Frankie" or "Fast Frankie" or for that matter "Fist Frankie," delivers what it promises. It's easily the best thing on the record."[13] Tony Scherman of Entertainment Weekly also gave the release a negative review and called it "an artlessly assembled excuse for an album, these minor-league White Zombie wannabes throw together pointless remixes, irritating skits, and lame covers of songs by Eurythmics, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, and Patti Smith. Co-producer Trent Reznor should hang his head in shame."[12]
Smells Like Children Tour[edit]
The Smells Like Children Tour was the fourth tour Marilyn Manson embarked on. The band was on the tour from June 1, 1995 until February 4, 1996. During these performances, the background scrim was a parody of a ouija board which read "Marilyn Manson" on the center. Another feature to the show was the addition of giant trees on each side of the stage from which hung ventriloquist dummies from the branches. The stage was usually set up to accommodate small audiences, as most of the shows took place in clubs, rather than arenas.
This was the first tour in which Manson began using stilts. The band also began their signature bizarre looks during these concerts as well, by shaving their eyebrows, and donning makeup and sexually suggestive clothes (with Manson wearing jock straps to pulling his pants down and tucking his penis between his legs, and with Ramirez beginning his traditional kinderwhore cross-dressing gimmick).
Once an occasional sight on the band's previous tours, Manson was now regularly seen cutting himself on stage most nights—particularly during performances of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)". He got his main chest scarring from this tour as he got into a heated argument with a crowd member and broke a glass bottle and ran it across his chest.
Track listing[edit]

No.
Title
Length

1. "The Hands of Small Children"   1:35
2. "Diary of a Dope Fiend" ("Dope Hat" re-record) 5:56
3. "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang"   1:19
4. "Kiddie Grinder (Remix)" ("Organ Grinder" remix) 4:23
5. "Sympathy for the Parents"   1:01
6. "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" (Eurythmics cover) 4:53
7. "Everlasting Cocksucker (Remix)" ("Cake and Sodomy" remix) 5:14
8. "Fuck Frankie"   1:48
9. "I Put a Spell on You" (Screamin' Jay Hawkins cover) 3:37
10. "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces"   3:59
11. "Scabs, Guns and Peanut Butter"   1:01
12. "Dance of the Dope Hats (Remix)" ("Dope Hat" remix, contains samples from "Cake and Sodomy") 4:40
13. "White Trash (Remixed by Tony F. Wiggins)" (uses lyrics from "Cake and Sodomy") 2:48
14. "Dancing with the One-Legged..."   0:46
15. "Rock 'n' Roll Nigger" (Patti Smith cover) 3:32
16. "Untitled" (first part is an alternative version of "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang") 8:20

[show]Promo version







  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Charts (1995)
Peak
 position

Canadian Albums Chart[14] 42
United States Billboard 200[15] 31

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Canada CRIA Platinum[16] 100,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[17] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Platinum[18] 1,000,000+ —

Singles[edit]

Single
Chart (1996)
Peak
 position
"Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" Hungary (Mahasz)[19] 7
Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[20] 26
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[20] 31
Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[21]Reverend Marilyn Manson – concept, vocals, producer
Twiggy Ramirez – bass
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, synthesizers, loops, programming
Ginger Fish – percussion

Production[21]Chris Vrenna – programming
Sean Beavan – engineer
Tony F. Wiggins – vocals
Frankie Proia – management
Joseph Cultice – photography
Gary Talpas – art direction, package design

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
2.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 177–198
3.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 180
4.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 177
5.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 179
6.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 191–192
7.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 190
8.Jump up ^ Interview
9.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 104–105
10.Jump up ^ "Blankman Inc Interviews Scott Mitchell Putesky ( Daisy Berkowitz )".
11.^ Jump up to: a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Smells Like Children Allmusic Review". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-07-12.
12.^ Jump up to: a b Scherman, Tony (1995-12-15). "Smells Like Children Music Review". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. (Time Warner). Retrieved 2011-06-24.
13.^ Jump up to: a b Christgau, Robert (1995). "Turkey Shoot". The Village Voice (November 28) (New York). Retrieved September 11, 2014.
14.Jump up ^ "Top Albums/CDs - Volume 64, No. 23, February 10, 1997". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved May 4, 2013. Note: Album listed as No. 63. See previous week's chart position.
15.Jump up ^ "Smells Like Children Charts & Awards". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
16.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson" Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 06, 2011.
17.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
18.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Smells Like Children" Recording Industry Association of America. Access date: March 06, 2011.
19.Jump up ^ "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
20.^ Jump up to: a b "Smells Like Children Charts & Awards Billboard Singles". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
21.^ Jump up to: a b "Smells Like Children credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.


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Smells Like Children

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Smells Like Children

EP by Marilyn Manson

Released
October 24, 1995
Recorded
1994–1995
Nothing Studios
(New Orleans)
Genre
Shock Rock, industrial rock experimental
Length
54:43
Label
Nothing/Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor
Marilyn Manson chronology

Portrait of an American Family
 (1994) Smells Like Children
 (1995) Antichrist Superstar
 (1996)


Singles from Smells Like Children
1."Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)"
 Released: June 22, 1996

Smells Like Children is an EP by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on October 24, 1995 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. It was produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. The release represents an era of the band full of drugs, abuses, tours, sound experiments, and is also a reference to the villain "The Child Catcher" from the 1968 musical film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
The release was initially proposed to strictly be a remix single for "Dope Hat", but various contributions by engineer and Skinny Puppy producer Dave Ogilvie, Nine Inch Nails live keyboardist Charlie Clouser and new material by the band resulted in an eclectic and unusual combination of material. All the ideas and tracks for this album were created and composed throughout the touring cycle in support of Portrait of an American Family, and is the first Marilyn Manson work that features longtime members Twiggy Ramirez on bass, and Ginger Fish on drums.
The album was certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).[1] Spearheaded by its sole single, a cover of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", originally written and performed by Eurythmics in 1983, the song became a staple on MTV and helped to establish the band in the mainstream.


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and development
2 Themes
3 Music 3.1 Songs
3.2 Samples
4 Release 4.1 Singles
5 Reception 5.1 Critical reception
6 Smells Like Children Tour
7 Track listing
8 Charts and certifications 8.1 Album charts
8.2 Certifications
8.3 Singles
9 Credits and personnel
10 References

Background and development[edit]
After the conclusion of the Portrait of an American Family Tour, the band undertook the opening slot position for Danzig's 4p Tour from March 24, 1995 until May 14, 1995. During their tenure, Danzig/Pantera tour bus driver Tony F. Wiggins befriended Marilyn Manson, bassist Twiggy Ramirez and keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy and went on backstage drug binges, perverse acts and other unusual escapades with them.[2]
The most well-known and notorious of Wiggins-related events was a series of backstage makeshift torture, interviews and confessions administered by himself, Manson, Ramirez and Gacy to disturbed, emotionally unstable and otherwise strange individuals who were both strangers and Marilyn Manson fans alike.[3]
After the tour ended, mention of Wiggins or any affiliation of with him was unknown. Manson later described him as "a vacuum cleaner for sin,"[4] and claims him to be indirectly responsible for his own disappearing innocence and human emotions on the road.[5] The current condition of their relationship is at best, a crucial part of Marilyn Manson history.
Themes[edit]
The band's frontman has discussed his thoughts in retrospect on Smells Like Children within his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell, circa 1998:
“ It was a perfect preface to an album about abuse: sexual abuse, domestic abuse, drug abuse, psychological abuse. Midway through the record, we [initially] included one of the taped confessions we had gathered, from a girl who molested her seven-year-old male cousin. It underscored the subplot of the album, about the most common target of abuse: innocence. I've always liked the Peter Pan idea of being a kid in mind if not in body, and Smells Like Children was supposed to be a record for someone who's no longer a child, someone who, like myself, wants their innocence back now that they're corrupted enough to appreciate it. [...] What began as a very disturbing record had become a record that disturbed only me.[6] ”
Manson has considered the release to be "An album that looks like an album for children that is not for children"; in fact, on the outer rim of the CD label the printed words "Keep this and all drugs away from small children" are visible.
Music[edit]
Songs[edit]
A number of cover songs are included in the track listing, most famous of which is the band's cover of Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", which helped to skyrocket the band into the mainstream. The other covers on the album are the Patti Smith song "Rock N Roll Nigger" and Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You", with the latter later featured on the soundtrack for David Lynch's 1997 psychological thriller film Lost Highway.
A recorded telephone conversation between Manson's mother and grandmother, titled "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces", is sometimes included on early bootlegs under the title "Procardia", in a heavily modified version which is actually a fan-made track, and not an actual track from either pressing—this version contains the original track in the left channel, and an extract from Raggedy Ann in the right. The Smells Like Children version was previously featured as part of the sound scape "Revelation #9", released on the single for "Get Your Gunn". Some of these bootlegs may also contain bonus tracks, including a demo for the song "My Monkey" from Portrait of an American Family, and another track called "Choklit Factory" taken from the bands' Spooky Kids-era.





"Diary of a Dope Fiend"







Album version, as it appeared on Smells Like Children. The title alludes to occult author Aleister Crowley's novel Diary of a Drug Fiend.

Problems playing this file? See media help.
The album alludes to famous occult author Aleister Crowley, particularly in the "Dope Hat" re-recording "Diary of a Dope Fiend" after the Crowley novel Diary of a Drug Fiend. The "Frankie" referred to in "Fuck Frankie" is Frankie Proia, Manson's tour manager at the time who embezzled $20,000 from the band during their tour for their previous release, Portrait of an American Family.[6] Wiggins recorded an acoustic rendition of the song "Cake and Sodomy" under the title "White Trash". Manson stated the irony of having Wiggins "strum and twang a redneck version" of the song was "perfect for its message, since [it] critiques southern Christian white trash".[6]
The "One-Legged..." referred to in "Dancing with the One-Legged..." was "a battered doll of Huggy Bear, the pimp from the 1970s cop thriller television series, Starsky and Hutch, which was missing a leg". Manson explains, "Inside that empty plastic socket was where we hid our drugs throughout the Tony Wiggins tour. Whenever we ingested the contents of that extra orifice, we referred to it in code as 'dancing with the one-legged pimp'".[6] The untitled sixteenth track contains a slower, more ominous remix of "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang" and, approximately 6 minutes in, an unusual audio experiment sometimes referred to as "Poop Games."
Samples[edit]



"The only solace was that through some unfortunate error someone at the record pressing plant made several thousand copies of our original version of the album, thinking it was the new one. Without even listening to them, the record company sent them out as promotional copies to radio stations and journalists before realizing their mistake. Now, they are available to anyone who wants to hear them on the Internet. Though someone at the label actually accused me of plotting it, I wish I was that resourceful. God, however irrelevant he may be to me, works in mysterious ways."[6]
—Marilyn Manson discussing the state of the removed tracks
Early promotional copies of Smells Like Children featured unauthorized samples from the films Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, as well as other sound bites considered "too extreme", therefore resulting in the tracklisting to be re-edited accordingly for public release, much to Manson's chagrin.[6] Interscope was not interested in buying licenses to use the film samples and demanded written affidavits from the participants in the sound bites, certifying their consent to be recorded.[6] The removed clips were the original opening track,"Abuse, Part 1 (There is Pain Involved)", featuring the voices of Manson and Wiggins as they attempted to calm down a masochistic girl when things got rather out-of-hand,[7] and "Abuse, Part 2 (Confessions)", featuring an interview with a teenage girl who confesses to molesting her 7-year-old male cousin.[6] These were replaced by "The Hands of Small Children" and "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces", respectively.
The tracks "Sympathy for the Parents" and "Dancing with the One-Legged..." are distorted sound clips taken from an appearance by Manson, Ramirez and Gacy on The Phil Donahue Show.[8] The episode discussed the dangers of moshing at concerts. The excerpt used in "Sympathy for the Parents" features Ramirez responding to a question about the attire worn by the band members by playing a cassette tape recording of "Scabs, Guns and Peanut Butter," before Manson's answer to the same question.
Release[edit]
Singles[edit]



Marilyn Manson in the music video for "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)"
Smells Like Children was anchored by only one single, a cover version of Eurythmics 1983 hit "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)".
Manson often drew musical inspiration from his dreams, but the idea to cover this song came from his first experimentation with LSD at a house party, according to his autobiography. He says that he hallucinated a "slower, meaner" version of the dance hit playing, sung in his voice.[9] He also stated that Nothing did not want to release this as a single. Daisy Berkowitz stated "When the song was released it divided people – they loved it or hated it. This was good. Just like us, as a band, if loved – you’re loved. If hated, people that hate you talk about you even more so".[10] They wanted to release their cover of Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You", which, according to Manson, "was far too dark, sprawling and esoteric, even for some of our fans."[6]
The music video for Manson's cover was a gateway to popularity for the band, eventually being nominated at the MTV Video Music Awards for Best Rock Video, and contains several clips of Manson and band members in what appears to be an old, decrepit asylum whilst wearing a variety of strange costumes. The overall video was shot with unusual filters: this was one of the first videos shot with director Dean Karr's initial vision intact, not based solely on whatever ideas the band had come up with prior. In between these clips are a number of surreal shots of Manson wearing a wedding gown, Manson wandering around an abandoned street in a tutu, birds fluttering around him and leaving dropping on his body, and footage of him riding a pig wearing a cowboy hat whilst covered with mud which Manson rides during the song's climax.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[11]
Entertainment Weekly (D)[12]
The Village Voice D+[13]
Upon its release, the album met with mixed to negative reviews from music critics. allmusic gave it a mixed review and said: "Where the full-length debut showed sparks of character and invention beneath industrial metal sludge, Smells Like Children is a smartly crafted horror show, filled with vulgarity, ugliness, goth freaks, and sideshow scares. Manson wisely chose to heighten his cartoonish personality with the EP. Most of the record is devoted to spoken words and samples, all designed to push the outrage buttons of middle America. Musically, it may not amount to much—it's goth-metal-industrial, as good as the "Dope Hat," "Lunchbox," and "Cake and Sodomy" trilogy that distinguished the debut—but as a sonic sculpture, as an objet d'art, it's effective and wickedly fascinating. It's exactly what Brian Warner needed to do to establish Marilyn Manson as America's bogeyman for the late '90s."[11]
In his review for The Village Voice, music critic Robert Christgau defined Smells Like Children as an "Unmitigated consumer fraud—a mess of instrumentals, covers, and remixes designed to exploit its well-publicized tour, genderfuck cover art, titillating titles, and parental warning label. The lyrics to "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang" are nonexistent, those to "Everlasting Cocksucker" incomprehensible. Only "Fuck Frankie," a spoken-word number in which a female feigning sexual ecstasy reveals that it isn't "Fool Frankie" or "Fire Frankie" or "Fast Frankie" or for that matter "Fist Frankie," delivers what it promises. It's easily the best thing on the record."[13] Tony Scherman of Entertainment Weekly also gave the release a negative review and called it "an artlessly assembled excuse for an album, these minor-league White Zombie wannabes throw together pointless remixes, irritating skits, and lame covers of songs by Eurythmics, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, and Patti Smith. Co-producer Trent Reznor should hang his head in shame."[12]
Smells Like Children Tour[edit]
The Smells Like Children Tour was the fourth tour Marilyn Manson embarked on. The band was on the tour from June 1, 1995 until February 4, 1996. During these performances, the background scrim was a parody of a ouija board which read "Marilyn Manson" on the center. Another feature to the show was the addition of giant trees on each side of the stage from which hung ventriloquist dummies from the branches. The stage was usually set up to accommodate small audiences, as most of the shows took place in clubs, rather than arenas.
This was the first tour in which Manson began using stilts. The band also began their signature bizarre looks during these concerts as well, by shaving their eyebrows, and donning makeup and sexually suggestive clothes (with Manson wearing jock straps to pulling his pants down and tucking his penis between his legs, and with Ramirez beginning his traditional kinderwhore cross-dressing gimmick).
Once an occasional sight on the band's previous tours, Manson was now regularly seen cutting himself on stage most nights—particularly during performances of "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)". He got his main chest scarring from this tour as he got into a heated argument with a crowd member and broke a glass bottle and ran it across his chest.
Track listing[edit]

No.
Title
Length

1. "The Hands of Small Children"   1:35
2. "Diary of a Dope Fiend" ("Dope Hat" re-record) 5:56
3. "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang"   1:19
4. "Kiddie Grinder (Remix)" ("Organ Grinder" remix) 4:23
5. "Sympathy for the Parents"   1:01
6. "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" (Eurythmics cover) 4:53
7. "Everlasting Cocksucker (Remix)" ("Cake and Sodomy" remix) 5:14
8. "Fuck Frankie"   1:48
9. "I Put a Spell on You" (Screamin' Jay Hawkins cover) 3:37
10. "May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces"   3:59
11. "Scabs, Guns and Peanut Butter"   1:01
12. "Dance of the Dope Hats (Remix)" ("Dope Hat" remix, contains samples from "Cake and Sodomy") 4:40
13. "White Trash (Remixed by Tony F. Wiggins)" (uses lyrics from "Cake and Sodomy") 2:48
14. "Dancing with the One-Legged..."   0:46
15. "Rock 'n' Roll Nigger" (Patti Smith cover) 3:32
16. "Untitled" (first part is an alternative version of "Shitty Chicken Gang Bang") 8:20

[show]Promo version







  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Charts (1995)
Peak
 position

Canadian Albums Chart[14] 42
United States Billboard 200[15] 31

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Canada CRIA Platinum[16] 100,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[17] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Platinum[18] 1,000,000+ —

Singles[edit]

Single
Chart (1996)
Peak
 position
"Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" Hungary (Mahasz)[19] 7
Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[20] 26
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[20] 31
Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[21]Reverend Marilyn Manson – concept, vocals, producer
Twiggy Ramirez – bass
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, synthesizers, loops, programming
Ginger Fish – percussion

Production[21]Chris Vrenna – programming
Sean Beavan – engineer
Tony F. Wiggins – vocals
Frankie Proia – management
Joseph Cultice – photography
Gary Talpas – art direction, package design

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
2.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 177–198
3.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 180
4.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 177
5.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 179
6.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 191–192
7.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 190
8.Jump up ^ Interview
9.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, pp. 104–105
10.Jump up ^ "Blankman Inc Interviews Scott Mitchell Putesky ( Daisy Berkowitz )".
11.^ Jump up to: a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Smells Like Children Allmusic Review". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-07-12.
12.^ Jump up to: a b Scherman, Tony (1995-12-15). "Smells Like Children Music Review". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. (Time Warner). Retrieved 2011-06-24.
13.^ Jump up to: a b Christgau, Robert (1995). "Turkey Shoot". The Village Voice (November 28) (New York). Retrieved September 11, 2014.
14.Jump up ^ "Top Albums/CDs - Volume 64, No. 23, February 10, 1997". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved May 4, 2013. Note: Album listed as No. 63. See previous week's chart position.
15.Jump up ^ "Smells Like Children Charts & Awards". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
16.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson" Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 06, 2011.
17.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
18.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Smells Like Children" Recording Industry Association of America. Access date: March 06, 2011.
19.Jump up ^ "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
20.^ Jump up to: a b "Smells Like Children Charts & Awards Billboard Singles". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
21.^ Jump up to: a b "Smells Like Children credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.


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Marilyn Manson



























































































































































































































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Portrait of an American Family

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Portrait of an American Family

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
July 19, 1994
Recorded
August–December 1993
The Record Plant, The Village Recorder
(Los Angeles, California)
10050 Cielo Drive, Benedict Canyon, Los Angeles (Le Pig)
(Beverly Hills, California)
Criteria Studios
(Miami, Florida)
Genre
Industrial rock, shock rock, industrial electronica
Length
61:05
Label
Nothing/Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor
Marilyn Manson chronology

The Manson Family Album
 (N/A) Portrait of an American Family
 (1994) Smells Like Children
 (1995)


Singles from Portrait of an American Family
1."Get Your Gunn"
 Released: June 9, 1994
2."Lunchbox"
 Released: February 6, 1995
3."Dope Hat"
 Released: 1995 (promotional)

Portrait of an American Family is the debut full-length studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on July 19, 1994 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. It was produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. The album was initially known as The Manson Family Album – a direct reference to serial killer Charles Manson's own band – but was retitled prior to release.
It is the only Marilyn Manson studio album to feature bassist Gidget Gein. Gein was fired from the band after its production following a very public and destructive heroin addiction and Twiggy Ramirez, the band's roadie and friend of Gein and Manson, was put as a temporary replacement while Gein got clean and sober. He eventually took over Gein's place and briefly adopted his image. Contrary to popular belief, Ramirez did not play bass on the album. Though Sara Lee Lucas was the featured drummer on the album, Nine Inch Nails live keyboardist Charlie Clouser used a drum machine to replace the work Lucas did. Daisy Berkowitz helped compose music for all of the songs except "Prelude (The Family Trip)" and "Sweet Tooth."
The album was certified Gold on May 29, 2003 by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in the United States.[1] It spawned three singles ("Get Your Gunn", "Lunchbox" and "Dope Hat").


Contents  [hide]
1 Background 1.1 The Manson Family Album
1.2 Track listing 1.2.1 Differences from The Manson Family Album

2 Themes
3 Music 3.1 Songs
3.2 Samples
4 Promotion
5 Release 5.1 Singles
5.2 Cover and packaging
6 Reception 6.1 Critical reception
6.2 Legacy
7 Re-Release 7.1 2009
8 Portrait of an American Family Tour
9 Track listing
10 Charts and certifications 10.1 Album charts
10.2 Certifications
10.3 Singles
11 Credits and personnel
12 References

Background[edit]
The Manson Family Album[edit]



"When we were finally finished, Roli had done the opposite of what I'd expected. I thought he was going to bring out some sort of darker element. But he was trying to polish all the rough edges and make us more of a rock band, a pop band, which at the time I wasn't interested in at all. I thought the record we did with him came out bland and lifeless. Trent thought the same thing so he volunteered to help us repair what had been damaged."[2]
—Marilyn Manson discussing the aftermath of the album's initial recording sessions.
Recording sessions for its national debut, Portrait of an American Family, began in July 1993. Working with producer Roli Mosimann at Criteria Studios in Miami, Florida,[2] the band recorded a selection of new songs along with reworked material from their Spooky Kids repertoire and, by the end of Autumn 1993, had completed the first version of their debut, a full album's worth of material collectively known as The Manson Family Album.[3] At the time, "Snake Eyes and Sissies" was on track to be the band's first single, with a single edit having already been made. However the band was simply not satisfied with the output of these recording sessions and shelved the album for a short time.[4]
Within a few months, the band convinced rising star Trent Reznor to produce the album instead.[5] The abrasive sonic "rawness" that Mosimann's production had brought to such groups as Swans had failed to materialize on The Manson Family Album; Reznor and all the band's members thought it "sucked", and was poorly representative of Marilyn Manson's dynamic live performances.[2][6] In October 1993, Reznor agreed to fully commit to the project, taking them and their tapes to various studios in Los Angeles. With the help of Reznor and numerous live members of his band, Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson re-recorded and reworked their old material until they were satisfied and released it under the name Portrait of an American Family.[7] "Snake Eyes and Sissies" would never see a single release and in the album's credits Mosimann is credited as an engineer with no mention of his production work.
Years later, former guitarist Daisy Berkowitz was asked about these original recordings in an interview and gave the interviewer a cassette tape featuring the unused recordings. The interviewer then released them to the Internet where they are now widely available, usually labeled as Portrait of an American Family (Pre-Reznor Mix) or Portrait of an American Family Demos.
Track listing[edit]
The Manson Family Album is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the complete version of the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, can be considered an album unto itself. Aside from the major differences listed below, most songs presented on the two versions are essentially the same yet mixed differently or have different tempos. Because of this, different instruments are moved to the front or back of the mix and/or may be sped up or slowed down creating a different overall mood while leaving much of the composition the same. The following track list is taken from the order the songs appeared in on Berkowitz's cassette tape. It is unclear if this was intended to be the final track order.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies"   5:09
2. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies" (Single mix edit) 3:57
3. "Lunchbox"   4:26
4. "Get Your Gunn"   4:04
5. "Cyclops"   3:41
6. "Citronella" (Dogma) 3:18
7. "Cake and Sodomy"   3:52
8. "Filth"   4:31
9. "Sweet Tooth"   4:41
10. "Organ Grinder"   5:04
11. "My Monkey"   4:52
12. "Misery Machine"   4:54
13. "Dope Hat"   4:27
Total length:
 56:58 
Differences from The Manson Family Album[edit]
There are many minor and major differences between Portrait of an American Family and its unreleased predecessor, The Manson Family Album:
"Prelude (The Family Trip)" is not present on the original album and was recorded solely for Portrait of an American Family.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is 62 seconds longer on the version that was finally released and featured extra alternate lyrics. It was also considered as a single and a radio edit was prepared for it that was never released.
"Lunchbox" now contains an opening sample of a child saying "Next motherfucker's gonna get my metal" and an opening "bionic guitar" contributed by Reznor, but is otherwise the same.
"Get Your Gunn" repeats the chorus and bridge more in the original version than in the released version and runs 50 seconds longer because of it.
"Citronella" was later renamed to "Dogma" for its official release, though the two versions are close to the same.
"Filth" is exclusive to the original release and was scrapped when the band changed producer.
"Wrapped in Plastic" was not initially planned to be released and was recorded exclusively for Portrait of an American Family.
"Sweet Tooth" now contains 59 seconds of introductory ambient noise on the final mix.
"My Monkey" has significantly more Charles Manson samples than the released mix (many from the initial demo versions) and some different horn sections in the background. Robert Pierce's singing is much clearer and placed higher in the mix on the original version as well. The original version lacks a chorus and uses the Manson samples where the chorus would later go.
Themes[edit]
The band's frontman has discussed his thoughts in retrospect on Portrait of an American Family with Empyrean Magazine, circa May/June 1995:

Well, the whole point of [Portrait of an American Family] was that I wanted to say a lot of the things I've said in interviews [...] But I wanted to address the hypocrisy of talk show America, how morals are worn as a badge to make you look good and how it's so much easier to talk about your beliefs than to live up to them. I was very much wrapped up in the concept that as kids growing up, a lot of the things that we're presented with have deeper meanings than our parents would like us to see, like Willy Wonka and the Brothers Grimm. So what I was trying to point out was that when our parents hide the truth from us, it's more damaging than if they were to expose us to things like Marilyn Manson in the first place."[8]
Music[edit]
Songs[edit]
"Cake and Sodomy" is the second track on the album. In 1990, Manson met a woman at a McDonald's restaurant in Fort Lauderdale who invited him to spend a weekend with her in New York City. Upon discovering that the girl was using her sister's ID because she was too young to work, Manson abandoned her, shortly after which he ran into two clubbers from South Florida. Manson spent the remainder of his stay in New York at the clubbers' hotel room, where he stumbled on Public-access television cable television channels, which were "a completely new phenomenon" to him. Manson "spent hours flipping through the station, watching Pat Robertson preach about society's evils and then ask people to call him with their credit card number," while "on the other channel, a guy was greasing up his cock with Vaseline and asking people to call and give him their credit card number." This inspired Manson to grab the hotel notepad and begin penning the song's lyrics. Manson explains in his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell that "I had written other songs I thought were good, but "Cake and Sodomy" was more than just a good song. As an anthem for the hypocritical America slobbering on the tit of Christianity, it was a blueprint for our future message."[9]
"Lunchbox" is the second single and the third track of the album. It was inspired by a piece of legislation dating back to 1972, which makes it illegal to have metal lunchboxes in schools. The song tells the story of a school age child who is bullied and uses his own lunchbox as a weapon in retaliation, waiting for the day he can "grow up to be a big rock and roll star" who is never intimidated by others. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's After School Special cassette tape, released in December 1991. The album version of "Lunchbox" samples The Crazy World of Arthur Brown song "Fire".
"Dope Hat" is the third and final single and the sixth track of the album. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's The Family Jams cassette, released in 1992. Whilst the band's keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy was given a music credit for the song on Portrait of an American Family, curiously his name is absent from the credits of The Family Jams and Refrigerator, two cassettes a demo of "Dope Hat" had appeared on beforehand. The single's release was accompanied by a music video which featured Manson in the role of Willy Wonka in a shock-horror version of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.
"Get Your Gunn" is the first single and the seventh track of the album. The song was inspired by the abortion provider David Gunn who was killed in Florida by a self-proclaimed pro-life activist. The frontman later described his murder as "the ultimate hypocrisy I witnessed growing up: that these people killed someone in the name of being 'pro-life'".[10]
"Wrapped in Plastic" is the eighth track on the album. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's Refrigerator cassette tape, released in 1993. It recycles lyrics from an earlier Spooky Kids song, "I.V.-T.V.". The frontman has stated that "Wrapped in Plastic" is about his past at his grandfather's basement. The version on The Family Jams cassette gives the listener better detail of this fact.
"Sweet Tooth" is the tenth song on the album, and the only song that former bassist Gidget Gein wrote both guitar and bass parts for. However, of all the album tracks, "Sweet Tooth" was the only one not regularly played live.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is the eleventh track on the album. Though "Snake Eyes and Sissies" was once considered important enough to be a potential single, it was never given a proper release and has not been played by the band since the Smells Like Children Tour in 1995/1996.
"My Monkey" is the twelfth track on the album. Several verses were taken from "Mechanical Man" written and performed by Charles Manson in 1968; the lyrics of "My Monkey" are credited simply to "Manson". The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's The Beaver Meat Cleaver Beat cassette tape, released in 1990.
"Misery Machine" is the thirteenth and final track on the album, and is a direct reference to the Mystery Machine from the animated television series Scooby-Doo. Imagery from the cartoon was prevalent in the early years of the band, having been used in various flyers among other similar cartoon characters.
Samples[edit]



"One strange thing that happened was we were mixing the song "Wrapped in Plastic". [...] We were using a computer because we had a lot of samples and sequencing. While we were working on that song the Charles Manson samples from "My Monkey" started appearing in the mix. All of a sudden we'd hear in the song, 'Why does a child reach up and kill his mom and dad?' And we couldn't figure what was going on. The chorus of "Wrapped in Plastic" is, 'Come into our home/Won't you stay?' And we're in the Sharon Tate house, just me and Sean Beavan [the record's assistant producer]. We totally got scared and we're like, 'We are done for the night.' We came back the next day and it was fine. The Charles Manson samples weren't even on the tape anymore. There's no real logical or technological explanation for why they appeared. It was a truly supernatural moment that freaked me out.[7]
—Marilyn Manson discussing paranormal behavior during the album's production.
Portrait of an American Family contains an especially wide array of cultural references:
The poem recited in "Prelude (The Family Trip)" comes from Roald Dahl's book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Also, the printing of the Marilyn Manson logo on various promotional items during this time, the opening titles of the "Dope Hat" music video, and the remix album Smells Like Children resemble the printing of the title to the 1971 film version of the novel.
The words "Go on and smile, you cunt!" at the beginning of "Cake and Sodomy" are spoken by Marlon Brando in the film Last Tango in Paris.
"Lunchbox" contains the sample "I bring you fire!" from the song "Fire" by The Crazy World of Arthur Brown.
"Organ Grinder" features the sample "Lollipops for the kiddie winkies," spoken by the Child Catcher from the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
At the start of "Cyclops" there is a very slowed down and distorted sample of the preacher from Poltergeist II: The Other Side singing "God is in His holy temple".
"Dope Hat" contains the samples "The great Hoodoo!", and "Prepare to meet your doom" taken from the Sid and Marty Krofft cult television series Lidsville. These words are spoken by the actor Charles Nelson Reilly.
After the third verse of "Get Your Gunn", there is a sample of a crowd murmuring and a gunshot. This is the audio from the press conference in which Budd Dwyer committed suicide in front of a live audience.
"Wrapped in Plastic" is influenced by the pilot episode of David Lynch's television series Twin Peaks, referencing the image of character Laura Palmer wrapped in plastic, which was one of the show's most enduring images. It also featured the distorted words "Hallelujah", "Come here, Laura", and "Meanwhile" from the scenes with The Man from Another Place in the Black and White Lodge. This is followed by Palmer's distinctive scream.
In the song "Dogma", there is a sample from the John Waters film Pink Flamingos, when Mink Stole's character says "Burn, you fucker!" before setting fire to a trailer. Although the clip from Desperate Living is credited in the liner notes, this audio clip is not. Furthermore, Waters was thanked in the liner notes.
"Killing is killing, whether done for duty, profit or fun" is a quote by Richard Ramirez taken from a court appearance that is an audio clip at the start of "Snake Eyes and Sissies".
The introduction to "My Monkey" contains multiple Charles Manson interview audio clips. The first of these is "Why are the children doing what they're doing? Why does a child reach up and kill his mom and dad and murder his two little sisters and then cut his throat?" in the beginning, and both "Raise up children, kill your moms and dads?" and "Where nothing is real but the medication and their numbers and then they cut their wrists and write 'I love you God' all over the walls and hang themselves on the ventilators." during the song's ending.
The phrase "We're gonna ride to the Abbey of Thelema" in the song "Misery Machine" is a reference to Aleister Crowley's Abbey of Thelema, which was used as the Headquarters from which the doctrines of Thelema would be spread throughout the world. The song also contains a sample from "Beep Beep" by The Playmates. A few seconds after the track, the sample, "Go home to your mother! Doesn't she ever watch you!? Tell her this isn't some Communist daycare center! Tell your mother I hate her! Tell your mother I hate you!" is spoken by Stole from the Waters film Desperate Living. After this, a telephone can be heard ringing very quietly for several minutes, which is then followed by an irate answering machine message, presumably from a mother of a Manson fan.
Promotion[edit]
To promote the album, Interscope held two separate release parties for music journalists and fan club members – the first of these was held less than a month before its commercial release in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on June 29, 1994, whilst the second took place a day before the record's scheduled date in Plantation, Florida on July 18, 1994.
Release[edit]
Singles[edit]
Portrait of an American Family was anchored by two singles, "Get Your Gunn" and "Lunchbox", along with "Dope Hat" which was issued to radio and music video channels without a commercial single release. A total of three singles were spawned from the album.
The music video for "Get Your Gunn", directed by Rod Chong, features the band performing in a damp "attic-like" scene, intertwined by footage of two feisty teenage girls. It did not receive much airplay.
The music video for "Lunchbox" directed by Richard Kern, features a boy being bullied by two older students. The boy goes home, fed up with the way he is treated, and shaves his head into a mohawk hairstyle and prepares for any future retaliation against the bullies with his metal lunchbox. The boy later goes to the rollerskating rink where the band is performing. The boy gives Manson his lunchbox, which Manson lights on fire and parades around. The video ends with the boy staring into the burning lunchbox. It is one of the few music videos with Manson performing without wearing makeup, alongside "Get Your Gunn" and "Tourniquet".
The music video for "Dope Hat", directed by Tom Stern, features the band riding a boat through a psychedelic tunnel directly inspired by the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, which happens to be one of Manson's favorite films. In the video, the band members perform with many children and people resembling the Oompa-Loompas from the film aboard the boat.
Cover and packaging[edit]



"I wanted to use a photo in [the album]'s booklet of me naked on a couch when I was a kid. When you hold up something to people, usually what they see in it is what's inside them in the first place. And that's what happened because the lawyers at Interscope said, 'First off, that picture's going to be considered child pornography, and not only will no stores carry the album but we're subject to legal retribution from it.' They said if a judge were to look at it, the law states that if a photograph of a minor elicits sexual excitement then it's considered child pornography. I said, 'That's exactly my point. This is a photograph that was taken by my mother, and it's extremely innocent and very normal. But if you see it as pornography, why am I the guilty person? You're the person who's got a hard-on. Why aren't you punished? That's still a point I'd like to make. People's morality is so ridiculous: If they get excited by it, then it's wrong."[11]
—Marilyn Manson discussing Interscope's objection to his initial vision of the album's cover art.
The album's original cover art featured no text, simply a painting of a clown by John Wayne Gacy. The interior photography included Polaroid pictures (faked by Manson and friends) apparently of a mutilated female body, and a photo of what Manson described as "one of those dolls from the '60s and you pull a string on the back of it and the eyes get really big and they change colors."[11]
In the early stages of the album's conception, Manson intended to use a picture of himself as a child sitting nude on a couch in the album's interior artwork. Though no genitalia is shown in the picture, and it was taken by his own parents with no vulgar intent, the label rejected the idea on the grounds that it could constitute as child pornography, so Manson instead created the clay sculpture present on the final cover artwork of the album. On the table on this sculpture, there are little models of The Beatles next to the lamp. The boy in the photograph on the back cover is Ramirez's half-brother Wes Brown. He's holding an ear-piercing needle rather than a syringe. Portrait of an American Family is notable for being the band's only studio album not to feature an image of Manson on the cover. However, Manson did eventually use a nude photo of himself as an adult for the inside flap photo for the CD single for "Lunchbox" but did not expose his genitals.
By the time the album became Portrait of an American Family, the ideas of using Gacy's clown artwork and the nude photograph was dropped completely.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 3.5/5 stars [12]
Rolling Stone 2/5 stars [13]
Upon its release, the album met with mixed reviews from music critics. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic gave the album a favorable review but noted that "even a few years on from its 1994 release, Portrait of an American Family began to sound a little dated, especially since its Nine Inch Nails-meets-W.A.S.P.-meets-Alice Cooper formula was fully realized on Manson's follow-up album, Antichrist Superstar. Here, it's in sketch form, and by the end of the album it's clear that Warner, Manson, whatever you want to call him, needs a full canvas to truly wreak havoc."[12] Rolling Stone gave the album a negative review and said that "Manson's debut [...] isn't the sharply rendered cultural critique of America he'd like you to think it is. Most of the record comes off like some low-budget horror movie.[13]
Legacy[edit]
In July 2014, Guitar World ranked Portrait of an American Family at number 18 in their "Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994" list.[14]
Re-Release[edit]
2009[edit]
In late 2009, it was re-released by Interscope and sold through Hot Topic stores as a special edition boxset combination of a T-shirt bearing the album artwork and colored vinyl LP record of the album. The color of the disc is green, matching most of the bands fonts at the time of the albums original 1994 release, however this reissue featured some imagery from The High End of Low on its label, much to the dismay of fans.[15]
Portrait of an American Family Tour[edit]



Twiggy Ramirez and Marilyn Manson performing at the Slammie Awards show at The Edge in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA on July 3, 1994.
Nine Inch Nails' Self Destruct Tour was the first tour Marilyn Manson embarked on, now under management of major record label Interscope Records. They were an opening act for Nine Inch Nails. The band was on the tour from April 24, 1994 until December 11, 1994.
The Portrait of an American Family Tour was the second tour Marilyn Manson embarked on. It was also the band's first headlining tour under a major label. The band was on the tour from December 27, 1994 until March 11, 1995. During these concerts, the stage usually was arranged like a living room, much like the one on the album cover artwork. A table with a lamp, candy canes and multiple six-sided dice were the most commonly seen props.
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson (except track one, "Prelude (The Family Trip)", taken from Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory; track 12, "My Monkey" which contains lyrics written by Charles Manson; track 14, which was written by Gary Numan)[16].

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Prelude (The Family Trip)"   Manson, Gacy 1:22
2. "Cake & Sodomy"   Berkowitz 3:53
3. "Lunchbox"   Berkowitz, Gein 4:34
4. "Organ Grinder"   Gein, Berkowitz 4:22
5. "Cyclops"   Berkowitz, Gein, Gacy 3:32
6. "Dope Hat"   Manson, Berkowitz, Gacy 4:20
7. "Get Your Gunn"   Berkowitz, Gein 3:17
8. "Wrapped In Plastic"   Berkowitz 5:35
9. "Dogma"   Berkowitz 3:26
10. "Sweet Tooth"   Gacy, Gein 5:03
11. "Snake Eyes & Sissies"   Gacy, Berkowitz, Gein 4:07
12. "My Monkey"   Berkowitz 4:31
13. "Misery Machine" (Actual song ends at 5:03) Gein, Berkowitz, Gacy 13:09

[show]Argentinian bonus tracks









   
   
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Charts (1995)
Peak
 position

United States (Billboard Top Heatseekers)[17] 35

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual sales
United Kingdom BPI Silver[18]  60,000+[19]
United States RIAA Gold[1] 500,000+ 645,000+[20]

Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (1997)
Peak
 position
"Get Your Gunn" Canada (Billboard Singles Chart)[21] 11
"Lunchbox" Canada (Billboard Singles Chart)[21] 5

Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[22]Mr. Manson – vocals, producer, brass, loops, artwork, adaptation, composer, logo (credited as "accusations, child manipulations, backwards masking, polaroids")
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars, acoustic guitars, composer (credited as "psychoacoustical guitars")
Madonna Wayne Gacy – calliope, hammond organ, saxophone, theremin, brass, overdubs, loops, composer, sound effects (credited as "hammond organ, theremin, saxophone, calliopenis, brass, babies, distorted muzette, loops") Voice (8)
Sara Lee Lucas – drums, sound effects (credited as "hitting")
Gidget Gein – bass, composer
Twiggy Ramirez – "base tendencies" (an often misunderstood pun, which of course, would be different from the bass guitar)

Production[22]Trent Reznor – executive producer, digital editing, editing, pandora, programming, mixing, brass, guitar (3)
Robin Finck – synthesis, keyboards (uncredited on album, however Manson has confirmed his involvement)
Roli Mosimann – engineer
Sean Beavan – assistant producer, programming, digital editing, editing, mixing, brass
Alan Moulder – assistant producer, engineer, mixing
Charlie Clouser – drums (8), African drums, drum programming, digital editing, editing
Chris Vrenna (credited as "Podboy") – percussion ('skull' on "Sweet Tooth"), programming, assistant engineer
Hope Nicholls - vocals, saxophone, citronella
Robert Pierce (aged 6) - vocals on "Lunchbox" and "My Monkey"
"Melissa (aged 19)" - 'violation' on "Wrapped in Plastic"
Gary Talpas – packaging

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.^ Jump up to: a b "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
2.^ Jump up to: a b c Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 144
3.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 123
4.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 128
5.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 134
6.Jump up ^ Greg, Baker (1994-07-20). "Manson Family Values" (TABLOID). Miami New Times (Village Voice Media, Inc.). Retrieved 2006-09-09.
7.^ Jump up to: a b Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 147
8.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 151
9.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 95
10.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (OP-ED ESSAY) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
11.^ Jump up to: a b Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 150
12.^ Jump up to: a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Portrait of an American Family review". AllMusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-06-28.
13.^ Jump up to: a b "Rolling Stone Album Guide for Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-06-28.
14.Jump up ^ "Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994". GuitarWorld.com. July 14, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
15.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family [Limited Edition Vinyl Box set with T-Shirt]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
16.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
17.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family Charts & Awards". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
18.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
19.Jump up ^ "Until July 2013, the BPI relied on a record company to request an award. Under the new system, sales figures are automatically recognised as soon as a record passes the relevant threshold." in "BBC News - Beatles albums finally go platinum". BBC News. BBC. September 2, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
20.Jump up ^ Grein, Paul. "This Year's "Gift" Is Smaller". Yahoo! Music. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
21.^ Jump up to: a b "Portrait of an American Family Charts & Awards Billboard Singles". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
22.^ Jump up to: a b "Portrait of an American Family credits". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_an_American_Family









Portrait of an American Family

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Portrait of an American Family

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
July 19, 1994
Recorded
August–December 1993
The Record Plant, The Village Recorder
(Los Angeles, California)
10050 Cielo Drive, Benedict Canyon, Los Angeles (Le Pig)
(Beverly Hills, California)
Criteria Studios
(Miami, Florida)
Genre
Industrial rock, shock rock, industrial electronica
Length
61:05
Label
Nothing/Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor
Marilyn Manson chronology

The Manson Family Album
 (N/A) Portrait of an American Family
 (1994) Smells Like Children
 (1995)


Singles from Portrait of an American Family
1."Get Your Gunn"
 Released: June 9, 1994
2."Lunchbox"
 Released: February 6, 1995
3."Dope Hat"
 Released: 1995 (promotional)

Portrait of an American Family is the debut full-length studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on July 19, 1994 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. It was produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. The album was initially known as The Manson Family Album – a direct reference to serial killer Charles Manson's own band – but was retitled prior to release.
It is the only Marilyn Manson studio album to feature bassist Gidget Gein. Gein was fired from the band after its production following a very public and destructive heroin addiction and Twiggy Ramirez, the band's roadie and friend of Gein and Manson, was put as a temporary replacement while Gein got clean and sober. He eventually took over Gein's place and briefly adopted his image. Contrary to popular belief, Ramirez did not play bass on the album. Though Sara Lee Lucas was the featured drummer on the album, Nine Inch Nails live keyboardist Charlie Clouser used a drum machine to replace the work Lucas did. Daisy Berkowitz helped compose music for all of the songs except "Prelude (The Family Trip)" and "Sweet Tooth."
The album was certified Gold on May 29, 2003 by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in the United States.[1] It spawned three singles ("Get Your Gunn", "Lunchbox" and "Dope Hat").


Contents  [hide]
1 Background 1.1 The Manson Family Album
1.2 Track listing 1.2.1 Differences from The Manson Family Album

2 Themes
3 Music 3.1 Songs
3.2 Samples
4 Promotion
5 Release 5.1 Singles
5.2 Cover and packaging
6 Reception 6.1 Critical reception
6.2 Legacy
7 Re-Release 7.1 2009
8 Portrait of an American Family Tour
9 Track listing
10 Charts and certifications 10.1 Album charts
10.2 Certifications
10.3 Singles
11 Credits and personnel
12 References

Background[edit]
The Manson Family Album[edit]



"When we were finally finished, Roli had done the opposite of what I'd expected. I thought he was going to bring out some sort of darker element. But he was trying to polish all the rough edges and make us more of a rock band, a pop band, which at the time I wasn't interested in at all. I thought the record we did with him came out bland and lifeless. Trent thought the same thing so he volunteered to help us repair what had been damaged."[2]
—Marilyn Manson discussing the aftermath of the album's initial recording sessions.
Recording sessions for its national debut, Portrait of an American Family, began in July 1993. Working with producer Roli Mosimann at Criteria Studios in Miami, Florida,[2] the band recorded a selection of new songs along with reworked material from their Spooky Kids repertoire and, by the end of Autumn 1993, had completed the first version of their debut, a full album's worth of material collectively known as The Manson Family Album.[3] At the time, "Snake Eyes and Sissies" was on track to be the band's first single, with a single edit having already been made. However the band was simply not satisfied with the output of these recording sessions and shelved the album for a short time.[4]
Within a few months, the band convinced rising star Trent Reznor to produce the album instead.[5] The abrasive sonic "rawness" that Mosimann's production had brought to such groups as Swans had failed to materialize on The Manson Family Album; Reznor and all the band's members thought it "sucked", and was poorly representative of Marilyn Manson's dynamic live performances.[2][6] In October 1993, Reznor agreed to fully commit to the project, taking them and their tapes to various studios in Los Angeles. With the help of Reznor and numerous live members of his band, Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson re-recorded and reworked their old material until they were satisfied and released it under the name Portrait of an American Family.[7] "Snake Eyes and Sissies" would never see a single release and in the album's credits Mosimann is credited as an engineer with no mention of his production work.
Years later, former guitarist Daisy Berkowitz was asked about these original recordings in an interview and gave the interviewer a cassette tape featuring the unused recordings. The interviewer then released them to the Internet where they are now widely available, usually labeled as Portrait of an American Family (Pre-Reznor Mix) or Portrait of an American Family Demos.
Track listing[edit]
The Manson Family Album is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the complete version of the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, can be considered an album unto itself. Aside from the major differences listed below, most songs presented on the two versions are essentially the same yet mixed differently or have different tempos. Because of this, different instruments are moved to the front or back of the mix and/or may be sped up or slowed down creating a different overall mood while leaving much of the composition the same. The following track list is taken from the order the songs appeared in on Berkowitz's cassette tape. It is unclear if this was intended to be the final track order.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies"   5:09
2. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies" (Single mix edit) 3:57
3. "Lunchbox"   4:26
4. "Get Your Gunn"   4:04
5. "Cyclops"   3:41
6. "Citronella" (Dogma) 3:18
7. "Cake and Sodomy"   3:52
8. "Filth"   4:31
9. "Sweet Tooth"   4:41
10. "Organ Grinder"   5:04
11. "My Monkey"   4:52
12. "Misery Machine"   4:54
13. "Dope Hat"   4:27
Total length:
 56:58 
Differences from The Manson Family Album[edit]
There are many minor and major differences between Portrait of an American Family and its unreleased predecessor, The Manson Family Album:
"Prelude (The Family Trip)" is not present on the original album and was recorded solely for Portrait of an American Family.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is 62 seconds longer on the version that was finally released and featured extra alternate lyrics. It was also considered as a single and a radio edit was prepared for it that was never released.
"Lunchbox" now contains an opening sample of a child saying "Next motherfucker's gonna get my metal" and an opening "bionic guitar" contributed by Reznor, but is otherwise the same.
"Get Your Gunn" repeats the chorus and bridge more in the original version than in the released version and runs 50 seconds longer because of it.
"Citronella" was later renamed to "Dogma" for its official release, though the two versions are close to the same.
"Filth" is exclusive to the original release and was scrapped when the band changed producer.
"Wrapped in Plastic" was not initially planned to be released and was recorded exclusively for Portrait of an American Family.
"Sweet Tooth" now contains 59 seconds of introductory ambient noise on the final mix.
"My Monkey" has significantly more Charles Manson samples than the released mix (many from the initial demo versions) and some different horn sections in the background. Robert Pierce's singing is much clearer and placed higher in the mix on the original version as well. The original version lacks a chorus and uses the Manson samples where the chorus would later go.
Themes[edit]
The band's frontman has discussed his thoughts in retrospect on Portrait of an American Family with Empyrean Magazine, circa May/June 1995:

Well, the whole point of [Portrait of an American Family] was that I wanted to say a lot of the things I've said in interviews [...] But I wanted to address the hypocrisy of talk show America, how morals are worn as a badge to make you look good and how it's so much easier to talk about your beliefs than to live up to them. I was very much wrapped up in the concept that as kids growing up, a lot of the things that we're presented with have deeper meanings than our parents would like us to see, like Willy Wonka and the Brothers Grimm. So what I was trying to point out was that when our parents hide the truth from us, it's more damaging than if they were to expose us to things like Marilyn Manson in the first place."[8]
Music[edit]
Songs[edit]
"Cake and Sodomy" is the second track on the album. In 1990, Manson met a woman at a McDonald's restaurant in Fort Lauderdale who invited him to spend a weekend with her in New York City. Upon discovering that the girl was using her sister's ID because she was too young to work, Manson abandoned her, shortly after which he ran into two clubbers from South Florida. Manson spent the remainder of his stay in New York at the clubbers' hotel room, where he stumbled on Public-access television cable television channels, which were "a completely new phenomenon" to him. Manson "spent hours flipping through the station, watching Pat Robertson preach about society's evils and then ask people to call him with their credit card number," while "on the other channel, a guy was greasing up his cock with Vaseline and asking people to call and give him their credit card number." This inspired Manson to grab the hotel notepad and begin penning the song's lyrics. Manson explains in his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell that "I had written other songs I thought were good, but "Cake and Sodomy" was more than just a good song. As an anthem for the hypocritical America slobbering on the tit of Christianity, it was a blueprint for our future message."[9]
"Lunchbox" is the second single and the third track of the album. It was inspired by a piece of legislation dating back to 1972, which makes it illegal to have metal lunchboxes in schools. The song tells the story of a school age child who is bullied and uses his own lunchbox as a weapon in retaliation, waiting for the day he can "grow up to be a big rock and roll star" who is never intimidated by others. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's After School Special cassette tape, released in December 1991. The album version of "Lunchbox" samples The Crazy World of Arthur Brown song "Fire".
"Dope Hat" is the third and final single and the sixth track of the album. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's The Family Jams cassette, released in 1992. Whilst the band's keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy was given a music credit for the song on Portrait of an American Family, curiously his name is absent from the credits of The Family Jams and Refrigerator, two cassettes a demo of "Dope Hat" had appeared on beforehand. The single's release was accompanied by a music video which featured Manson in the role of Willy Wonka in a shock-horror version of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.
"Get Your Gunn" is the first single and the seventh track of the album. The song was inspired by the abortion provider David Gunn who was killed in Florida by a self-proclaimed pro-life activist. The frontman later described his murder as "the ultimate hypocrisy I witnessed growing up: that these people killed someone in the name of being 'pro-life'".[10]
"Wrapped in Plastic" is the eighth track on the album. The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's Refrigerator cassette tape, released in 1993. It recycles lyrics from an earlier Spooky Kids song, "I.V.-T.V.". The frontman has stated that "Wrapped in Plastic" is about his past at his grandfather's basement. The version on The Family Jams cassette gives the listener better detail of this fact.
"Sweet Tooth" is the tenth song on the album, and the only song that former bassist Gidget Gein wrote both guitar and bass parts for. However, of all the album tracks, "Sweet Tooth" was the only one not regularly played live.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is the eleventh track on the album. Though "Snake Eyes and Sissies" was once considered important enough to be a potential single, it was never given a proper release and has not been played by the band since the Smells Like Children Tour in 1995/1996.
"My Monkey" is the twelfth track on the album. Several verses were taken from "Mechanical Man" written and performed by Charles Manson in 1968; the lyrics of "My Monkey" are credited simply to "Manson". The earliest recording of this song dates back to the band's The Beaver Meat Cleaver Beat cassette tape, released in 1990.
"Misery Machine" is the thirteenth and final track on the album, and is a direct reference to the Mystery Machine from the animated television series Scooby-Doo. Imagery from the cartoon was prevalent in the early years of the band, having been used in various flyers among other similar cartoon characters.
Samples[edit]



"One strange thing that happened was we were mixing the song "Wrapped in Plastic". [...] We were using a computer because we had a lot of samples and sequencing. While we were working on that song the Charles Manson samples from "My Monkey" started appearing in the mix. All of a sudden we'd hear in the song, 'Why does a child reach up and kill his mom and dad?' And we couldn't figure what was going on. The chorus of "Wrapped in Plastic" is, 'Come into our home/Won't you stay?' And we're in the Sharon Tate house, just me and Sean Beavan [the record's assistant producer]. We totally got scared and we're like, 'We are done for the night.' We came back the next day and it was fine. The Charles Manson samples weren't even on the tape anymore. There's no real logical or technological explanation for why they appeared. It was a truly supernatural moment that freaked me out.[7]
—Marilyn Manson discussing paranormal behavior during the album's production.
Portrait of an American Family contains an especially wide array of cultural references:
The poem recited in "Prelude (The Family Trip)" comes from Roald Dahl's book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Also, the printing of the Marilyn Manson logo on various promotional items during this time, the opening titles of the "Dope Hat" music video, and the remix album Smells Like Children resemble the printing of the title to the 1971 film version of the novel.
The words "Go on and smile, you cunt!" at the beginning of "Cake and Sodomy" are spoken by Marlon Brando in the film Last Tango in Paris.
"Lunchbox" contains the sample "I bring you fire!" from the song "Fire" by The Crazy World of Arthur Brown.
"Organ Grinder" features the sample "Lollipops for the kiddie winkies," spoken by the Child Catcher from the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
At the start of "Cyclops" there is a very slowed down and distorted sample of the preacher from Poltergeist II: The Other Side singing "God is in His holy temple".
"Dope Hat" contains the samples "The great Hoodoo!", and "Prepare to meet your doom" taken from the Sid and Marty Krofft cult television series Lidsville. These words are spoken by the actor Charles Nelson Reilly.
After the third verse of "Get Your Gunn", there is a sample of a crowd murmuring and a gunshot. This is the audio from the press conference in which Budd Dwyer committed suicide in front of a live audience.
"Wrapped in Plastic" is influenced by the pilot episode of David Lynch's television series Twin Peaks, referencing the image of character Laura Palmer wrapped in plastic, which was one of the show's most enduring images. It also featured the distorted words "Hallelujah", "Come here, Laura", and "Meanwhile" from the scenes with The Man from Another Place in the Black and White Lodge. This is followed by Palmer's distinctive scream.
In the song "Dogma", there is a sample from the John Waters film Pink Flamingos, when Mink Stole's character says "Burn, you fucker!" before setting fire to a trailer. Although the clip from Desperate Living is credited in the liner notes, this audio clip is not. Furthermore, Waters was thanked in the liner notes.
"Killing is killing, whether done for duty, profit or fun" is a quote by Richard Ramirez taken from a court appearance that is an audio clip at the start of "Snake Eyes and Sissies".
The introduction to "My Monkey" contains multiple Charles Manson interview audio clips. The first of these is "Why are the children doing what they're doing? Why does a child reach up and kill his mom and dad and murder his two little sisters and then cut his throat?" in the beginning, and both "Raise up children, kill your moms and dads?" and "Where nothing is real but the medication and their numbers and then they cut their wrists and write 'I love you God' all over the walls and hang themselves on the ventilators." during the song's ending.
The phrase "We're gonna ride to the Abbey of Thelema" in the song "Misery Machine" is a reference to Aleister Crowley's Abbey of Thelema, which was used as the Headquarters from which the doctrines of Thelema would be spread throughout the world. The song also contains a sample from "Beep Beep" by The Playmates. A few seconds after the track, the sample, "Go home to your mother! Doesn't she ever watch you!? Tell her this isn't some Communist daycare center! Tell your mother I hate her! Tell your mother I hate you!" is spoken by Stole from the Waters film Desperate Living. After this, a telephone can be heard ringing very quietly for several minutes, which is then followed by an irate answering machine message, presumably from a mother of a Manson fan.
Promotion[edit]
To promote the album, Interscope held two separate release parties for music journalists and fan club members – the first of these was held less than a month before its commercial release in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on June 29, 1994, whilst the second took place a day before the record's scheduled date in Plantation, Florida on July 18, 1994.
Release[edit]
Singles[edit]
Portrait of an American Family was anchored by two singles, "Get Your Gunn" and "Lunchbox", along with "Dope Hat" which was issued to radio and music video channels without a commercial single release. A total of three singles were spawned from the album.
The music video for "Get Your Gunn", directed by Rod Chong, features the band performing in a damp "attic-like" scene, intertwined by footage of two feisty teenage girls. It did not receive much airplay.
The music video for "Lunchbox" directed by Richard Kern, features a boy being bullied by two older students. The boy goes home, fed up with the way he is treated, and shaves his head into a mohawk hairstyle and prepares for any future retaliation against the bullies with his metal lunchbox. The boy later goes to the rollerskating rink where the band is performing. The boy gives Manson his lunchbox, which Manson lights on fire and parades around. The video ends with the boy staring into the burning lunchbox. It is one of the few music videos with Manson performing without wearing makeup, alongside "Get Your Gunn" and "Tourniquet".
The music video for "Dope Hat", directed by Tom Stern, features the band riding a boat through a psychedelic tunnel directly inspired by the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, which happens to be one of Manson's favorite films. In the video, the band members perform with many children and people resembling the Oompa-Loompas from the film aboard the boat.
Cover and packaging[edit]



"I wanted to use a photo in [the album]'s booklet of me naked on a couch when I was a kid. When you hold up something to people, usually what they see in it is what's inside them in the first place. And that's what happened because the lawyers at Interscope said, 'First off, that picture's going to be considered child pornography, and not only will no stores carry the album but we're subject to legal retribution from it.' They said if a judge were to look at it, the law states that if a photograph of a minor elicits sexual excitement then it's considered child pornography. I said, 'That's exactly my point. This is a photograph that was taken by my mother, and it's extremely innocent and very normal. But if you see it as pornography, why am I the guilty person? You're the person who's got a hard-on. Why aren't you punished? That's still a point I'd like to make. People's morality is so ridiculous: If they get excited by it, then it's wrong."[11]
—Marilyn Manson discussing Interscope's objection to his initial vision of the album's cover art.
The album's original cover art featured no text, simply a painting of a clown by John Wayne Gacy. The interior photography included Polaroid pictures (faked by Manson and friends) apparently of a mutilated female body, and a photo of what Manson described as "one of those dolls from the '60s and you pull a string on the back of it and the eyes get really big and they change colors."[11]
In the early stages of the album's conception, Manson intended to use a picture of himself as a child sitting nude on a couch in the album's interior artwork. Though no genitalia is shown in the picture, and it was taken by his own parents with no vulgar intent, the label rejected the idea on the grounds that it could constitute as child pornography, so Manson instead created the clay sculpture present on the final cover artwork of the album. On the table on this sculpture, there are little models of The Beatles next to the lamp. The boy in the photograph on the back cover is Ramirez's half-brother Wes Brown. He's holding an ear-piercing needle rather than a syringe. Portrait of an American Family is notable for being the band's only studio album not to feature an image of Manson on the cover. However, Manson did eventually use a nude photo of himself as an adult for the inside flap photo for the CD single for "Lunchbox" but did not expose his genitals.
By the time the album became Portrait of an American Family, the ideas of using Gacy's clown artwork and the nude photograph was dropped completely.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 3.5/5 stars [12]
Rolling Stone 2/5 stars [13]
Upon its release, the album met with mixed reviews from music critics. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic gave the album a favorable review but noted that "even a few years on from its 1994 release, Portrait of an American Family began to sound a little dated, especially since its Nine Inch Nails-meets-W.A.S.P.-meets-Alice Cooper formula was fully realized on Manson's follow-up album, Antichrist Superstar. Here, it's in sketch form, and by the end of the album it's clear that Warner, Manson, whatever you want to call him, needs a full canvas to truly wreak havoc."[12] Rolling Stone gave the album a negative review and said that "Manson's debut [...] isn't the sharply rendered cultural critique of America he'd like you to think it is. Most of the record comes off like some low-budget horror movie.[13]
Legacy[edit]
In July 2014, Guitar World ranked Portrait of an American Family at number 18 in their "Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994" list.[14]
Re-Release[edit]
2009[edit]
In late 2009, it was re-released by Interscope and sold through Hot Topic stores as a special edition boxset combination of a T-shirt bearing the album artwork and colored vinyl LP record of the album. The color of the disc is green, matching most of the bands fonts at the time of the albums original 1994 release, however this reissue featured some imagery from The High End of Low on its label, much to the dismay of fans.[15]
Portrait of an American Family Tour[edit]



Twiggy Ramirez and Marilyn Manson performing at the Slammie Awards show at The Edge in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA on July 3, 1994.
Nine Inch Nails' Self Destruct Tour was the first tour Marilyn Manson embarked on, now under management of major record label Interscope Records. They were an opening act for Nine Inch Nails. The band was on the tour from April 24, 1994 until December 11, 1994.
The Portrait of an American Family Tour was the second tour Marilyn Manson embarked on. It was also the band's first headlining tour under a major label. The band was on the tour from December 27, 1994 until March 11, 1995. During these concerts, the stage usually was arranged like a living room, much like the one on the album cover artwork. A table with a lamp, candy canes and multiple six-sided dice were the most commonly seen props.
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson (except track one, "Prelude (The Family Trip)", taken from Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory; track 12, "My Monkey" which contains lyrics written by Charles Manson; track 14, which was written by Gary Numan)[16].

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Prelude (The Family Trip)"   Manson, Gacy 1:22
2. "Cake & Sodomy"   Berkowitz 3:53
3. "Lunchbox"   Berkowitz, Gein 4:34
4. "Organ Grinder"   Gein, Berkowitz 4:22
5. "Cyclops"   Berkowitz, Gein, Gacy 3:32
6. "Dope Hat"   Manson, Berkowitz, Gacy 4:20
7. "Get Your Gunn"   Berkowitz, Gein 3:17
8. "Wrapped In Plastic"   Berkowitz 5:35
9. "Dogma"   Berkowitz 3:26
10. "Sweet Tooth"   Gacy, Gein 5:03
11. "Snake Eyes & Sissies"   Gacy, Berkowitz, Gein 4:07
12. "My Monkey"   Berkowitz 4:31
13. "Misery Machine" (Actual song ends at 5:03) Gein, Berkowitz, Gacy 13:09

[show]Argentinian bonus tracks









   
   
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Charts (1995)
Peak
 position

United States (Billboard Top Heatseekers)[17] 35

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual sales
United Kingdom BPI Silver[18]  60,000+[19]
United States RIAA Gold[1] 500,000+ 645,000+[20]

Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (1997)
Peak
 position
"Get Your Gunn" Canada (Billboard Singles Chart)[21] 11
"Lunchbox" Canada (Billboard Singles Chart)[21] 5

Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[22]Mr. Manson – vocals, producer, brass, loops, artwork, adaptation, composer, logo (credited as "accusations, child manipulations, backwards masking, polaroids")
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars, acoustic guitars, composer (credited as "psychoacoustical guitars")
Madonna Wayne Gacy – calliope, hammond organ, saxophone, theremin, brass, overdubs, loops, composer, sound effects (credited as "hammond organ, theremin, saxophone, calliopenis, brass, babies, distorted muzette, loops") Voice (8)
Sara Lee Lucas – drums, sound effects (credited as "hitting")
Gidget Gein – bass, composer
Twiggy Ramirez – "base tendencies" (an often misunderstood pun, which of course, would be different from the bass guitar)

Production[22]Trent Reznor – executive producer, digital editing, editing, pandora, programming, mixing, brass, guitar (3)
Robin Finck – synthesis, keyboards (uncredited on album, however Manson has confirmed his involvement)
Roli Mosimann – engineer
Sean Beavan – assistant producer, programming, digital editing, editing, mixing, brass
Alan Moulder – assistant producer, engineer, mixing
Charlie Clouser – drums (8), African drums, drum programming, digital editing, editing
Chris Vrenna (credited as "Podboy") – percussion ('skull' on "Sweet Tooth"), programming, assistant engineer
Hope Nicholls - vocals, saxophone, citronella
Robert Pierce (aged 6) - vocals on "Lunchbox" and "My Monkey"
"Melissa (aged 19)" - 'violation' on "Wrapped in Plastic"
Gary Talpas – packaging

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.^ Jump up to: a b "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2008-08-14.
2.^ Jump up to: a b c Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 144
3.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 123
4.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 128
5.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 134
6.Jump up ^ Greg, Baker (1994-07-20). "Manson Family Values" (TABLOID). Miami New Times (Village Voice Media, Inc.). Retrieved 2006-09-09.
7.^ Jump up to: a b Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 147
8.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 151
9.Jump up ^ Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 95
10.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (OP-ED ESSAY) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
11.^ Jump up to: a b Manson & Strauss 1998, p. 150
12.^ Jump up to: a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Portrait of an American Family review". AllMusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-06-28.
13.^ Jump up to: a b "Rolling Stone Album Guide for Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-06-28.
14.Jump up ^ "Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994". GuitarWorld.com. July 14, 2014. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
15.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family [Limited Edition Vinyl Box set with T-Shirt]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
16.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
17.Jump up ^ "Portrait of an American Family Charts & Awards". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
18.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
19.Jump up ^ "Until July 2013, the BPI relied on a record company to request an award. Under the new system, sales figures are automatically recognised as soon as a record passes the relevant threshold." in "BBC News - Beatles albums finally go platinum". BBC News. BBC. September 2, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
20.Jump up ^ Grein, Paul. "This Year's "Gift" Is Smaller". Yahoo! Music. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
21.^ Jump up to: a b "Portrait of an American Family Charts & Awards Billboard Singles". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
22.^ Jump up to: a b "Portrait of an American Family credits". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2011-05-23.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_an_American_Family









The Manson Family Album

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search



 This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012)

The Manson Family Album

Demo album by Marilyn Manson

Released
Never released
Recorded
1993
Genre
Alternative metal, heavy metal
Length
56:58
Producer
Marilyn Manson, Roli Mosimann
Marilyn Manson chronology

 The Manson Family Album
 (N/A) Portrait of an American Family
 (1994)

The Manson Family Album was intended to be Marilyn Manson's first studio album and is a precursor to Portrait of an American Family. It is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, it can be considered an album unto itself.
The album's title is a reference to serial killer Charles Manson's band, "The Manson Family". Though "Snake Eyes & Sissies" was once considered important enough to be a single, it was never given a release and has not been played by the band since the Smells Like Children Tour in 1995/1996.


Contents  [hide]
1 History 1.1 Differences from Portrait of an American Family
2 Album artwork 2.1 Track listing
3 Personnel
4 References

History[edit]
Initially, Manson sought out Roli Mosimann to produce the album and with him the band recorded an album's worth of material. At the time, "Snake Eyes & Sissies" was on track to be the band's first single, with a single edit having been made. However the band was simply not satisfied with the output of these recording sessions and shelved the album for a short time.
Within a few months, the band would convince rising star Trent Reznor to produce the album instead. With the help of Reznor and his band, Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson re-recorded and reworked their old material until they were satisfied and released it under the name Portrait of an American Family. "Snake Eyes & Sissies" would never see a single release and in Portrait's credits Mosimann is credited as an engineer with no mention of his production work.
Years later, former guitarist Scott Putesky was asked about these original recordings in an interview and gave the interviewer a tape featuring the unused recordings. The interviewer then released them to the internet where they are now widely available, usually labeled as "Portrait of an American Family Pre-Reznor Mix" or "Portrait of an American Family Demos".
Differences from Portrait of an American Family[edit]
There are many minor and major differences between The Manson Family Album and its eventual successor, Portrait of an American Family:
"Prelude (The Family Trip)" is not present on this release and was recorded solely for Portrait of an American Family.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is 62 seconds longer than the version that was finally released and featured extra alternate lyrics. It was also considered as a single and a radio edit was prepared for it that was never released.
"Lunchbox" lacks the opening sample of a child saying "Next motherfucker's gonna get my metal" and the opening "bionic guitar" contributed by Reznor, but is otherwise the same.
"Get Your Gunn" repeats the chorus and bridge more than the released version and runs 50 seconds longer because of it.
"Citronella" was later renamed to "Dogma" for its official release, though the two versions are close to the same.
"Filth" is exclusive to this release and was scrapped when the band changed producer.
"Wrapped in Plastic" was not initially planned to be released and was recorded exclusively for Portrait of an American Family.
"Sweet Tooth" lacks the 59 seconds of introductory ambient noise found on the final mix.
"My Monkey" has significantly more Charles Manson samples than the released mix (many from the initial demo versions) and some different horn sections in the background. Robert Pierce's singing is much clearer and placed higher in the mix on this version as well. This version lacks a chorus and uses the Manson samples where the chorus would later go.
Album artwork[edit]
The album's original cover art featured no text, simply a painting of a clown by John Wayne Gacy. The Gacy painting was used as album art by the band Acid Bath for the album When the Kite String Pops in 1994. The interior photography included Polaroid pictures (faked by Manson and friends) apparently of a mutilated female body, and a photo of what Manson described as "one of those dolls from the 60s and you pull a string on the back of it and the eyes get really big and they change colors."
In the early stages of the album's conception, Manson intended to use a picture of himself as a child sitting nude on a couch in the album's interior artwork. Though no genitalia is shown in the picture, and it was taken by his own parents with no vulgar intent, the record label deemed it to be child pornography.
By the time the album became Portrait of an American Family, the ideas of using the Gacy artwork and the nude photo was dropped completely.
Track listing[edit]
The Manson Family Album is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the complete version of the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, can be considered an album unto itself. Aside from the major differences listed below, most songs presented on the two versions are essentially the same yet mixed differently or have different tempos. Because of this, different instruments are moved to the front or back of the mix and/or may be sped up or slowed down creating a different overall mood while leaving much of the composition the same. The following track list is taken from the order the songs appeared in on Berkowitz's cassette tape. It is unclear if this was intended to be the final track order.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies"   5:09
2. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies" (Single mix edit) 3:57
3. "Lunchbox"   4:26
4. "Get Your Gunn"   4:04
5. "Cyclops"   3:41
6. "Citronella" (Dogma) 3:18
7. "Cake and Sodomy"   3:52
8. "Filth"   4:31
9. "Sweet Tooth"   4:41
10. "Organ Grinder"   5:04
11. "My Monkey"   4:52
12. "Misery Machine"   4:54
13. "Dope Hat"   4:27
Total length:
 56:58 
Personnel[edit]
Marilyn Manson – vocals, producer
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, loops and samples
Gidget Gein – bass
Sara Lee Lucas – drums, sound effects
Robert Pierce - vocals on "My Monkey"
Roli Mosimann - producer
References[edit]


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Unreleased albums
Demo albums
Marilyn Manson (band) albums
1993 albums






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Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Manson_Family_Album









The Manson Family Album

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search



 This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012)

The Manson Family Album

Demo album by Marilyn Manson

Released
Never released
Recorded
1993
Genre
Alternative metal, heavy metal
Length
56:58
Producer
Marilyn Manson, Roli Mosimann
Marilyn Manson chronology

 The Manson Family Album
 (N/A) Portrait of an American Family
 (1994)

The Manson Family Album was intended to be Marilyn Manson's first studio album and is a precursor to Portrait of an American Family. It is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, it can be considered an album unto itself.
The album's title is a reference to serial killer Charles Manson's band, "The Manson Family". Though "Snake Eyes & Sissies" was once considered important enough to be a single, it was never given a release and has not been played by the band since the Smells Like Children Tour in 1995/1996.


Contents  [hide]
1 History 1.1 Differences from Portrait of an American Family
2 Album artwork 2.1 Track listing
3 Personnel
4 References

History[edit]
Initially, Manson sought out Roli Mosimann to produce the album and with him the band recorded an album's worth of material. At the time, "Snake Eyes & Sissies" was on track to be the band's first single, with a single edit having been made. However the band was simply not satisfied with the output of these recording sessions and shelved the album for a short time.
Within a few months, the band would convince rising star Trent Reznor to produce the album instead. With the help of Reznor and his band, Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson re-recorded and reworked their old material until they were satisfied and released it under the name Portrait of an American Family. "Snake Eyes & Sissies" would never see a single release and in Portrait's credits Mosimann is credited as an engineer with no mention of his production work.
Years later, former guitarist Scott Putesky was asked about these original recordings in an interview and gave the interviewer a tape featuring the unused recordings. The interviewer then released them to the internet where they are now widely available, usually labeled as "Portrait of an American Family Pre-Reznor Mix" or "Portrait of an American Family Demos".
Differences from Portrait of an American Family[edit]
There are many minor and major differences between The Manson Family Album and its eventual successor, Portrait of an American Family:
"Prelude (The Family Trip)" is not present on this release and was recorded solely for Portrait of an American Family.
"Snake Eyes and Sissies" is 62 seconds longer than the version that was finally released and featured extra alternate lyrics. It was also considered as a single and a radio edit was prepared for it that was never released.
"Lunchbox" lacks the opening sample of a child saying "Next motherfucker's gonna get my metal" and the opening "bionic guitar" contributed by Reznor, but is otherwise the same.
"Get Your Gunn" repeats the chorus and bridge more than the released version and runs 50 seconds longer because of it.
"Citronella" was later renamed to "Dogma" for its official release, though the two versions are close to the same.
"Filth" is exclusive to this release and was scrapped when the band changed producer.
"Wrapped in Plastic" was not initially planned to be released and was recorded exclusively for Portrait of an American Family.
"Sweet Tooth" lacks the 59 seconds of introductory ambient noise found on the final mix.
"My Monkey" has significantly more Charles Manson samples than the released mix (many from the initial demo versions) and some different horn sections in the background. Robert Pierce's singing is much clearer and placed higher in the mix on this version as well. This version lacks a chorus and uses the Manson samples where the chorus would later go.
Album artwork[edit]
The album's original cover art featured no text, simply a painting of a clown by John Wayne Gacy. The Gacy painting was used as album art by the band Acid Bath for the album When the Kite String Pops in 1994. The interior photography included Polaroid pictures (faked by Manson and friends) apparently of a mutilated female body, and a photo of what Manson described as "one of those dolls from the 60s and you pull a string on the back of it and the eyes get really big and they change colors."
In the early stages of the album's conception, Manson intended to use a picture of himself as a child sitting nude on a couch in the album's interior artwork. Though no genitalia is shown in the picture, and it was taken by his own parents with no vulgar intent, the record label deemed it to be child pornography.
By the time the album became Portrait of an American Family, the ideas of using the Gacy artwork and the nude photo was dropped completely.
Track listing[edit]
The Manson Family Album is composed of the original takes and alternate mixes of songs that would later be found on the complete version of the band's debut and due to the many differences between it and its final form, can be considered an album unto itself. Aside from the major differences listed below, most songs presented on the two versions are essentially the same yet mixed differently or have different tempos. Because of this, different instruments are moved to the front or back of the mix and/or may be sped up or slowed down creating a different overall mood while leaving much of the composition the same. The following track list is taken from the order the songs appeared in on Berkowitz's cassette tape. It is unclear if this was intended to be the final track order.

No.
Title
Length

1. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies"   5:09
2. "Snakes Eyes and Sissies" (Single mix edit) 3:57
3. "Lunchbox"   4:26
4. "Get Your Gunn"   4:04
5. "Cyclops"   3:41
6. "Citronella" (Dogma) 3:18
7. "Cake and Sodomy"   3:52
8. "Filth"   4:31
9. "Sweet Tooth"   4:41
10. "Organ Grinder"   5:04
11. "My Monkey"   4:52
12. "Misery Machine"   4:54
13. "Dope Hat"   4:27
Total length:
 56:58 
Personnel[edit]
Marilyn Manson – vocals, producer
Daisy Berkowitz – guitars
Madonna Wayne Gacy – keyboards, loops and samples
Gidget Gein – bass
Sara Lee Lucas – drums, sound effects
Robert Pierce - vocals on "My Monkey"
Roli Mosimann - producer
References[edit]


[hide]
v ·
 t ·
 e
 
Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Unreleased albums
Demo albums
Marilyn Manson (band) albums
1993 albums






Navigation menu



Create account
Log in



Article

Talk









Read

Edit

View history

















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Contents
Featured content
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Random article
Donate to Wikipedia
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Help
About Wikipedia
Community portal
Recent changes
Contact page

Tools
What links here
Related changes
Upload file
Special pages
Permanent link
Page information
Wikidata item
Cite this page

Print/export
Create a book
Download as PDF
Printable version

Languages
Українська
Edit links
This page was last modified on 4 February 2014, at 06:09.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Privacy policy
About Wikipedia
Disclaimers
Contact Wikipedia
Developers
Mobile view
Wikimedia Foundation
Powered by MediaWiki
    
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Manson_Family_Album









The Golden Age of Grotesque

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


The Golden Age of Grotesque

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
May 13, 2003
Recorded
2002–2003
 Doppelherz Studio
(Hollywood, California)
 The Mix Room
(Burbank, California)
Genre
Industrial metal, electro-industrial
Length
57:32
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Marilyn Manson and Tim Sköld
Marilyn Manson chronology

Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
 (2000) The Golden Age of Grotesque
 (2003) Lest We Forget: The Best Of
 (2004)


Singles from The Golden Age of Grotesque
1."mOBSCENE"
 Released: April 22, 2003
2."This Is the New Shit"
 Released: September 1, 2003

The Golden Age of Grotesque is the fifth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson, released in May 2003 by Nothing and Interscope Records. It is the band's last album recorded as a five-piece, as John 5 left the group in 2004. Limited edition units included a DVD titled Doppelherz (Double-heart), a surrealist short film directed by Manson.
It was revealed in a 2007 edition of the British rock magazine Kerrang! that The Golden Age of Grotesque was intended to be Marilyn Manson's departure from music. The album has received mixed to positive reviews from mainstream music critics.
The album was certified gold in Australia, Austria, France, Germany, Switzerland and the UK. It spawned two singles ("This Is the New Shit" and "mOBSCENE"). The band supported the album with the Grotesk Burlesk Tour, and the album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.


Contents  [hide]
1 Production and development 1.1 Concept and themes
2 Promotion 2.1 Grotesk Burlesk Tour
3 Reception 3.1 Critical reception
3.2 Commercial performance
4 Track listing
5 Charts and certifications 5.1 Album charts
5.2 Certifications
5.3 Chart procession and succession
5.4 Singles
6 Release history
7 Credits and personnel
8 References

Production and development[edit]



 A photograph, from a set of four, created in 2003 by Gottfried Helnwein.


 Album logo.
In a November 2001 post on MarilynManson.com's message board, Manson stated that the band's fifth studio album would be "very much guitar driven," in spite of previous claims that it would be beat-oriented. He also revealed that he had been working on a remix of "The Fight Song" with Slipknot drummer Joey Jordison, and that he was collaborating with Tim Sköld on an original score for the forthcoming Resident Evil movie. On May 29, 2002, Sköld became an official band member when Twiggy Ramirez amicably left the group, citing creative differences.[1]
Most of the songwriting effort on The Golden Age of Grotesque was shared between Tim Sköld, John 5 and Marilyn Manson. Instrumentally, the album is more beat-driven and electronic than previous releases, with several reviewers commenting that its sound is at times reminiscent of KMFDM — which is likely attributable to Sköld, as he was a member of KMFDM immediately prior to his arrival in Marilyn Manson. In a January 2008 interview with The Heirophant, Manson revealed that the majority of the albums' keyboard and synthesizer work was performed by him, and not the band's then-keyboardist, Madonna Wayne Gacy. Gacy, according to Manson, had displayed little to no interest in contributing creatively during early stages of the album's development, eventually detaching himself from the band to such a degree that he refused to attend studio sessions when informed by management of the band's intentions to begin recording in June 2002.[2] As a result, Manson received musical composition credits for eleven of the fifteen tracks found on the record, in addition to his usual lyrical credits.
In May 2002, Manson began his long-term collaboration with the Austrian-Irish artist Gottfried Helnwein by working on the album artwork and various other projects, including several exhibitions, as well as the artwork which accompanied Manson's essay for The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.[3] Helnwein later expressed disappointment that this image was not selected as the album cover.[4]
Three months prior to album release, The Mechanism of Desire, a two minute videoclip, was uploaded to MarilynManson.com on February 14, 2003, as an official introduction to The Golden Age of Grotesque era.[5] It depicted the band in their new attire, consisting of suits resembling those of Nazi military bandsmen during the Second World War, accompanied by clips of Manson's then-girlfriend Dita Von Teese and close-ups of Manson's face. The video was accompanied by a soundtrack in which a speech by Alfred Hitchcock can be heard, followed by the audio of "Baboon Rape Party". The video is no longer available on Manson's official website.
Limited edition units of the album included a DVD titled Doppelherz (Double-heart), a 25-minute surrealist short film directed by Manson which features art direction by Helnwein, further extending on themes found on The Mechanism of Desire.[6] The video was accompanied with a stream of consciousness spoken word recording of Manson from a year prior, in 2002, juxtaposed against an audio loop of "Thaeter". This pressing of the album is now out of print, and the film has yet to see standalone release.
Concept and themes[edit]



"Imagination is a necessity, and I don't think it's sort of bad. I can dream up some image like I did with Helnwein, and they're "bad," they're forbidden, but I can take an image that's far worse, that's on CNN and it's reality. So we can't get censored. It's the real world. But that's a bad message to send to kids growing up, I think."
—Marilyn Manson[7]
Incorporating themes from the 1930s, specifically the Weimar Republic era of pre-Nazi Germany,[8] the album's musical and visual themes were primarily drawn from Mel Gordon's 2000 book Voluptuous Panic: The Erotic World of Weimar Berlin. Concerned that Gordon might take issue with use of the book's material, Manson called Gordon, who said he couldn't imagine a greater compliment than a popular music album based on an academic book.[9] The album artwork is also influenced by the illustrations found in Voluptuous Panic.
The Golden Age of Grotesque follows the evolution of Manson himself ("Thaeter") through to "Obsequey (The Death of Art)", or "art into a product." The album takes on dual-layer storylines, first as a punk rock balladeer spouting the notion of living life to the fullest with the presumption that there is no future.[10] The second storyline takes a parody to the idea that living life to the fullest has led us into a nihilistic stupidity, hence the "rebel to sell" references within "The Bright Young Things" and the transformation into a commercially acceptable "happy" icon, Mickey Mouse (Manson posed as Mickey Mouse throughout the album's publicity.) Lyrically, this album is full of historical and pop references, much like Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death). References include Peter Pan, Adolf Hitler, and Oscar Wilde. As in many of his other works, he frequently makes use of word play, puns and double entendres, coining words like "gloominati", "scabaret sacrilegends", "vivi-sex symbol", "cocaingels", "mOBSCENE", "vodevil" and "para-noir".
Promotion[edit]
On May 12, 2003, a unique launch party took place at The Key Club in Los Angeles, to celebrate the album's release. On May 16, 2003, Marilyn Manson appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, performing "mOBSCENE" and "This Is the New Shit" to an audience of eager fans. A film called "A Grotesque Evening with Marilyn Manson" was released in Spain to promote the album.
Two singles were released from the album, "mOBSCENE" and "This Is the New Shit", the former topping the charts in Belgium and peaking within the top 10 in a dozen other countries. A controversial music video was independently produced for the song "(s)AINT". Directed by Asia Argento and containing scenes of violence, nudity, masturbation, drug-use and self-mutilation, Interscope Records refused to be associated with the work and blocked any possibility of a conventional release, cancelling plans to release "(s)AINT" as the album's third single. A limited run of DVD's were briefly available to purchase on the band's official website, and it was later included on international editions of the Lest We Forget: The Best Of bonus DVD.



 Performing live in 2003.
Grotesk Burlesk Tour[edit]
Main article: Grotesk Burlesk Tour
Grotesk Burlesk was the ninth tour Marilyn Manson embarked on under management of major record label Interscope Records. Beginning on April 11, 2003, and lasting until January 3, 2004, the tour included eight legs, spanning Eurasia, Japan and North America, with a total of 105 completed shows out of the 109 planned.[11]
Much of the elaborate attire and clothing worn by Manson on the tour was tailored by French fashion designer and grand couturier Jean-Paul Gaultier.[12][13]
The stage was designed to resemble that of the classic vaudeville and burlesque stage shows of the 1930s, a prevalent motif found in the album itself. Encompassing this theme most notably were two live dancers dressed in vintage burlesque costume who would be present on stage for most of the show, they danced for "mOBSCENE" and "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", and performed piano for "The Golden Age of Grotesque" and floor toms for "Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag". They also appeared during performances of "Para-noir". Dressed as if they were conjoined, they accompanied Manson as he was elevated some 12 metre (39 ft) above the stage, much like during performances of "Cruci-Fiction in Space" on the Guns, God and Government tour. The stage also utilized a series of platforms. Manson would sing at a podium for performances of "The Fight Song", donning blackface while wearing an Allgemeine SS-style peaked police cap or, alternatively, Mickey Mouse ears. During performances of "The Dope Show", Manson would wear elongated arms designed by Rudy Coby, which he would swing in a marching manner as he walked along the stage. At the end of each performance of "The Golden Age of Grotesque", Manson played saxophone—a rare instance of the vocalist playing a live instrument in concert.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]




"The Golden Age of Grotesque"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque


"Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque

Problems playing these files? See media help.

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic (60/100)[14]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[15]
Alternative Press 8/10 stars[16]
BBC Music (favorable)[17]
Drowned in Sound 7/10 stars[18]
Entertainment Weekly (B-)[19]
The Guardian 3/5 stars[20]
Mojo 3/5 stars[21]
Popmatters (3/10)[22]
Q 3/5 stars[23]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[24]
Critical response to The Golden Age of Grotesque was mixed. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album has received an average score of 60, indicating mixed or average reviews, based on 12 publications.[14] Although ending up in many critics' 'best of' lists for 2003, other critics consider this Manson's weakest album, arguing that it lacks originality and thoughtful lyrics compared to its predecessors.
Many of the positive reviews focused heavily on the album's production,[14] with Q magazine stating that "Grotesque rocks like a bastard,"[23] along with Alternative Press who commented that "the army of noise behind his bitterness is at once massive and impressive," awarding the album an 8/10 score.[16] Stephen Thomas Erlewine, in an overwhelmingly positive review for AllMusic, praised the album's "thudding metallic grind," describing it as "light and nimble, even though it's drenched in distortion and screams." Erlewine also opined that "[...] in an era when heavy rockers have no idea what happened in the '80s, much less the '30s, it's hard not to warm to this, even if his music isn't your own personal bag," before summarizing that "unlike in the past, Manson isn't taking himself so seriously. It all adds up to a very good album—maybe not his best, and certainly not one that will attract the most attention, but it's a hell of a lot grander than what his peers are producing, and holds its own with his previous records. It's also a bit more fun, too, and that counts for a lot."[15] Barry Walters of Rolling Stone commented that "Marilyn Manson really should be sucking by now. What's surprising is that there's still so much life in what Manson is rehashing. [...] The album loses momentum as the songs slow and dull down, but the first half of Grotesque shines brighter than it should."[24]
Commercial performance[edit]
In the United States, The Golden Age of Grotesque was met with modest commercial success. The album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 album chart, with 118,000 copies sold its first week — just 1,000 more than the opening week sales tally of previous album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), which debuted at No. 13 — and was the lowest selling No. 1 debut of the year.[25] As of November 2008, the album had sold 526,000 copies in the U.S.,[26] but has yet to be accredited with a certification from the RIAA. On its second week of release, the album reached No. 1 on the Canadian Albums Chart.[27]
In contrast, the album was, by far, Manson's most successful release in Europe, peaking within the top five in most of the major European markets. The set reached No. 1 in five countries — Austria, Belgium (Wallonia), Germany, Italy and Switzerland — while also reaching the top five in Belgium (Flanders), France, Norway, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom.[28][29] In France, where the set peaked at No. 2, the album was awarded a gold certification from the Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique for shipments of over 100,000 units.[30] The album has sold over 120,000 copies in the region.[31] The album received a gold certification from Germany's BVMI under previous criteria which awarded gold certifications to albums that shipped in excess of 250,000 units, as opposed to the current level of 100,000 units.[32] The set also attained gold status in Austria,[33] Switzerland[34] and the UK,[35] indicating shipments of 10,000, 20,000 & 100,000 units respectively.
In Australia and New Zealand, The Golden Age of Grotesque debuted at No. 5 and No. 16 on the official charts, respectively.[28][36] The album was certified gold in Australia by the ARIA, indicating shipments of 35,000 units.[37]
According to MTV Spain, the album has sold 4 million copies worldwide.[38]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson.

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Thaeter"   Gacy, Manson, Sköld 1:14
2. "This Is the New Shit"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 4:20
3. "mOBSCENE"   John 5, Manson 3:25
4. "Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 4:11
5. "Use Your Fist and Not Your Mouth"   John 5, Manson 3:34
6. "The Golden Age of Grotesque"   John 5, Manson 4:05
7. "(s)AINT"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 3:42
8. "Ka-Boom Ka-Boom"   John 5, Sköld 4:02
9. "Slutgarden"   John 5, Manson 4:06
10. "♠" (Sometimes known as "Spade") John 5 4:34
11. "Para-noir"   John 5, Gacy, Manson, Sköld 6:01
12. "The Bright Young Things"   John 5 4:19
13. "Better of Two Evils"   John 5, Gacy, Manson, Sköld 3:48
14. "Vodevil"   John 5, Sköld 4:39
15. "Obsequey (The Death of Art)"   Manson, Sköld 1:34

[show]Bonus Tracks









   
   
   
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[28] 5
Austria (Ö3)[28] 1
Belgium (Flanders) (Ultratop 50)[29] 4
Belgium (Wallonia) (Ultratop)[29] 1
Canada (CANOE)[27] 1
Denmark (Tracklisten)[28] 6
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[28] 8
France (SNEP)[28] 2
Germany (Media Control)[28] 1
Hungary (Mahasz)[39] 28
Ireland (IRMA)[28] 7
Italy (FIMI)[28] 1
Japan (Oricon)[40] 5
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[28] 14
New Zealand (RIANZ)[36] 16
Norway (VG-Lista)[28] 4
Poland (ZPAV)[28] 18
Portugal (AFP)[28] 4
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[28] 7
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[28] 4
Switzerland (Hitparade)[28] 1
United Kingdom (OCC)[28] 4
United States Billboard 200[28] 1

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Australia ARIA Gold[37] 35,000+ —
Austria IFPI Gold[33] 10,000+ —
France SNEP Gold[30] 100,000+ 120,000+[31]
Germany BVMI Gold[32] 250,000+ —
Switzerland IFPI Gold[34] 20,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[35] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA —[A] — 526,000+[26]
Notes
A^ Despite selling enough copies as of November 2008 to be certified gold in the United States, the album has yet to be accredited with a certification from the RIAA.

Chart procession and succession[edit]
Preceded by
Dalla pace del mare lontano by Sergio Cammariere Italian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 16, 2003–May 30, 2003 Succeeded by
Sono io, l'uomo della storia accanto by Claudio Baglioni
Preceded by
American Life by Madonna Swiss Albums Chart number-one album
 May 25, 2003–June 1, 2003 Succeeded by
The Matrix Reloaded (OST) by Various Artists
Preceded by
Aufwind by Seer Austrian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 28, 2003–June 4, 2003 Succeeded by
Nena feat. Nena - Live by Nena
Preceded by
Body Kiss by The Isley Brothers feat. Ronald Isley Billboard 200 number-one album
 May 31, 2003–June 7, 2003 Succeeded by
14 Shades of Grey by Staind
Preceded by
Come Away With Me by Norah Jones Canadian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 31, 2003–June 7, 2003 Succeeded by
Deftones by Deftones
Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

"mOBSCENE" Australia[41] 31
Austria[41] 15
Belgium (Wallonia)[42] 1
Canada[43] 7
Denmark[41] 7
Finland[41] 16
France[41] 61
Germany[41] 20
Hungary[39] 6
Ireland[41] 27
Italy[41] 9
Netherlands[42] 84
New Zealand[41] 32
Norway[41] 20
Sweden[41] 18
Switzerland[41] 6
United Kingdom[41] 13
U.S. Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[43] 26
Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[43] 18
Billboard Hot 100 Singles Sales[44] 5

Single
Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

"This Is the New Shit" Australia[45] 31
Austria[45] 24
France[45] 75
Germany[45] 25
Ireland[45] 50
Sweden[45] 59
Switzerland[45] 44
United Kingdom[45] 29

Release history[edit]

Region
Date
Label
Format
Catalog
Mexico May 5, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800078
Germany May 12, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc —
North America May 13, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 37002
United Kingdom May 13, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800065
Australia May 19, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800065
Japan June 17, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc UICS 1050
Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[46]Marilyn Manson – vocals, piano, synth-bass, mellotron, saxophone, guitar, loops, editing, melody arrangement, producer, composer
John 5 – guitar, rhythm guitar, piano, orchestration, composer
Tim Sköld – bass, guitar, accordion, keyboards, producer, loops, artwork, digital editing, drum programming, synth-bass, electronics, beats, composer
Madonna Wayne Gacy – composer, editing, electronics, loops, melody arrangement, synthesizer, keyboards, live keyboards
Ginger Fish – drums, rhythm direction

Production[46]Chuck Bailey – assistant engineer
Tom Baker – mastering
Jon Blaine – hair stylist
Blumpy – digital editing
Jeff Burns – assistant
Ross Garfield – drum technician
Lily & Pat – vocals (mOBSCENE & Para-noir)
Ben Grosse – producer, engineer, digital editing, mixing
Mark Williams – A&R
Gottfried Helnwein – art direction

References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ METEOR SHOWERS AND LAP DANCE. MarilynManson.com. Marilyn Manson. November 2001.
2.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson files countersuit against ex-bandmate Stephen Bier". SIDE-LINE.com. December 25, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
3.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Shocking New Images Revealed". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (941). 2003-02-08.
4.Jump up ^ Helnwein, Gottfried (2003-09-01). "Album Covers That Never Were". Gottfried Helnwein. Retrieved 2011-05-02.
5.Jump up ^ "The Golden Age of Grotesque". mansonwiki.com. September 26, 2007. Retrieved April 27, 2012.[dead link]
6.Jump up ^ "The Golden Age of Grotesque [Limited Edition]". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-18.
7.Jump up ^ "Interview with Marilyn Manson The Golden Age". Helnwein-music.com. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
8.Jump up ^ Winwood, Ian (2002-03-23). "Paranoia, Jail Sentences, September 11 and Kittens?". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group).
9.Jump up ^ "The RU Sirius Show » Show #49: The Hipster Whores of Weimar Germany: Mel Gordon pt. 2". Rusiriusradio.com. 2006-06-20. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
10.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Iomusic News. Retrieved 2008-01-25.
11.Jump up ^ "Grotesk Burlesk (tour)". Retrieved 2011-08-25.
12.Jump up ^ "For The Record: Quick News On Marilyn Manson And Jean Paul Gaultier, Bone Crusher, Cam'ron, Pearl Jam, Jimi Hendrix & More". MTV News. 2003-04-28. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
13.Jump up ^ "Fashion Rocks Red Carpet". Style Magazine. Archived from the original on 2007-10-16. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
14.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson - The Golden Age Of Grotesque". Metacritic. Retrieved September 3, 2013.
15.^ Jump up to: a b Allmusic Review Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
16.^ Jump up to: a b Alternative Press. Jul 2003 issue. p. 117. Check date values in: |date= (help)
17.Jump up ^ BBC Music Review BBC.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
18.Jump up ^ Price, Dale (2003-05-20). "Drowned In Sound Review". Drowned in Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
19.Jump up ^ Greer, Jim (May 16, 2003). The Golden Age Of Grotesque Review. Entertainment Weekly. p. 72. Retrieved 2012-03-14.
20.Jump up ^ The Guardian Review Guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
21.Jump up ^ Mojo. Jun 2003 issue. p. 100. Check date values in: |date= (help)
22.Jump up ^ Hreha, Scott (2003-08-26). "Marilyn Manson: The Golden Age of Grotesque". popmatters.com. Retrieved 2013-09-06.
23.^ Jump up to: a b Q magazine. June 2003 issue. p. 103. Check date values in: |date= (help)
24.^ Jump up to: a b Walter, Barry (2003-05-06). "Rolling Stone Review". RollingStone.com. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
25.Jump up ^ Manson Golden at Number One RollingStone.com. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
26.^ Jump up to: a b Grein, Paul. "The 25 Worst-Selling #1 Albums" Yahoo! Music. Retrieved 2008-11-21.
27.^ Jump up to: a b Marilyn Manson biography XR100. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
28.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Album Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
29.^ Jump up to: a b c "Discography Marilyn Manson". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
30.^ Jump up to: a b Les Certifications DisqueEnFrance.com. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
31.^ Jump up to: a b French Gold Certification with exact sales figure InfoDisc.fr. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
32.^ Jump up to: a b "Gold/Platin Datenbank Deutschland". IFPI.de. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
33.^ Jump up to: a b "Gold/Platin Datenbank Österreichischen". IFPI.at. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
34.^ Jump up to: a b "The Official Swiss Charts & Music Community". SwissCharts.com. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
35.^ Jump up to: a b "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search" BPI.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
36.^ Jump up to: a b "New Zealand Chart Positions". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
37.^ Jump up to: a b "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2003 Albums". ARIA.com.au. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
38.Jump up ^ Biografía de Marilyn Manson MTV.es. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
39.^ Jump up to: a b "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
40.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson album sales ranking". Oricon. Retrieved June 22, 2012.
41.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m mOBSCENE Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
42.^ Jump up to: a b "mOBSCENE Chart Statistics II". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c Allmusic Charts & Awards Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2011-01-05.
44.Jump up ^ Billboard Hot 100 Single Sales Chart Books.Google.ie. Retrieved 2011-08-25.
45.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h This Is The New Shit Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
46.^ Jump up to: a b "The Golden Age of Grotesque credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.


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 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Golden_Age_of_Grotesque









The Golden Age of Grotesque

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The Golden Age of Grotesque

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
May 13, 2003
Recorded
2002–2003
 Doppelherz Studio
(Hollywood, California)
 The Mix Room
(Burbank, California)
Genre
Industrial metal, electro-industrial
Length
57:32
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Marilyn Manson and Tim Sköld
Marilyn Manson chronology

Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
 (2000) The Golden Age of Grotesque
 (2003) Lest We Forget: The Best Of
 (2004)


Singles from The Golden Age of Grotesque
1."mOBSCENE"
 Released: April 22, 2003
2."This Is the New Shit"
 Released: September 1, 2003

The Golden Age of Grotesque is the fifth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson, released in May 2003 by Nothing and Interscope Records. It is the band's last album recorded as a five-piece, as John 5 left the group in 2004. Limited edition units included a DVD titled Doppelherz (Double-heart), a surrealist short film directed by Manson.
It was revealed in a 2007 edition of the British rock magazine Kerrang! that The Golden Age of Grotesque was intended to be Marilyn Manson's departure from music. The album has received mixed to positive reviews from mainstream music critics.
The album was certified gold in Australia, Austria, France, Germany, Switzerland and the UK. It spawned two singles ("This Is the New Shit" and "mOBSCENE"). The band supported the album with the Grotesk Burlesk Tour, and the album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.


Contents  [hide]
1 Production and development 1.1 Concept and themes
2 Promotion 2.1 Grotesk Burlesk Tour
3 Reception 3.1 Critical reception
3.2 Commercial performance
4 Track listing
5 Charts and certifications 5.1 Album charts
5.2 Certifications
5.3 Chart procession and succession
5.4 Singles
6 Release history
7 Credits and personnel
8 References

Production and development[edit]



 A photograph, from a set of four, created in 2003 by Gottfried Helnwein.


 Album logo.
In a November 2001 post on MarilynManson.com's message board, Manson stated that the band's fifth studio album would be "very much guitar driven," in spite of previous claims that it would be beat-oriented. He also revealed that he had been working on a remix of "The Fight Song" with Slipknot drummer Joey Jordison, and that he was collaborating with Tim Sköld on an original score for the forthcoming Resident Evil movie. On May 29, 2002, Sköld became an official band member when Twiggy Ramirez amicably left the group, citing creative differences.[1]
Most of the songwriting effort on The Golden Age of Grotesque was shared between Tim Sköld, John 5 and Marilyn Manson. Instrumentally, the album is more beat-driven and electronic than previous releases, with several reviewers commenting that its sound is at times reminiscent of KMFDM — which is likely attributable to Sköld, as he was a member of KMFDM immediately prior to his arrival in Marilyn Manson. In a January 2008 interview with The Heirophant, Manson revealed that the majority of the albums' keyboard and synthesizer work was performed by him, and not the band's then-keyboardist, Madonna Wayne Gacy. Gacy, according to Manson, had displayed little to no interest in contributing creatively during early stages of the album's development, eventually detaching himself from the band to such a degree that he refused to attend studio sessions when informed by management of the band's intentions to begin recording in June 2002.[2] As a result, Manson received musical composition credits for eleven of the fifteen tracks found on the record, in addition to his usual lyrical credits.
In May 2002, Manson began his long-term collaboration with the Austrian-Irish artist Gottfried Helnwein by working on the album artwork and various other projects, including several exhibitions, as well as the artwork which accompanied Manson's essay for The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.[3] Helnwein later expressed disappointment that this image was not selected as the album cover.[4]
Three months prior to album release, The Mechanism of Desire, a two minute videoclip, was uploaded to MarilynManson.com on February 14, 2003, as an official introduction to The Golden Age of Grotesque era.[5] It depicted the band in their new attire, consisting of suits resembling those of Nazi military bandsmen during the Second World War, accompanied by clips of Manson's then-girlfriend Dita Von Teese and close-ups of Manson's face. The video was accompanied by a soundtrack in which a speech by Alfred Hitchcock can be heard, followed by the audio of "Baboon Rape Party". The video is no longer available on Manson's official website.
Limited edition units of the album included a DVD titled Doppelherz (Double-heart), a 25-minute surrealist short film directed by Manson which features art direction by Helnwein, further extending on themes found on The Mechanism of Desire.[6] The video was accompanied with a stream of consciousness spoken word recording of Manson from a year prior, in 2002, juxtaposed against an audio loop of "Thaeter". This pressing of the album is now out of print, and the film has yet to see standalone release.
Concept and themes[edit]



"Imagination is a necessity, and I don't think it's sort of bad. I can dream up some image like I did with Helnwein, and they're "bad," they're forbidden, but I can take an image that's far worse, that's on CNN and it's reality. So we can't get censored. It's the real world. But that's a bad message to send to kids growing up, I think."
—Marilyn Manson[7]
Incorporating themes from the 1930s, specifically the Weimar Republic era of pre-Nazi Germany,[8] the album's musical and visual themes were primarily drawn from Mel Gordon's 2000 book Voluptuous Panic: The Erotic World of Weimar Berlin. Concerned that Gordon might take issue with use of the book's material, Manson called Gordon, who said he couldn't imagine a greater compliment than a popular music album based on an academic book.[9] The album artwork is also influenced by the illustrations found in Voluptuous Panic.
The Golden Age of Grotesque follows the evolution of Manson himself ("Thaeter") through to "Obsequey (The Death of Art)", or "art into a product." The album takes on dual-layer storylines, first as a punk rock balladeer spouting the notion of living life to the fullest with the presumption that there is no future.[10] The second storyline takes a parody to the idea that living life to the fullest has led us into a nihilistic stupidity, hence the "rebel to sell" references within "The Bright Young Things" and the transformation into a commercially acceptable "happy" icon, Mickey Mouse (Manson posed as Mickey Mouse throughout the album's publicity.) Lyrically, this album is full of historical and pop references, much like Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death). References include Peter Pan, Adolf Hitler, and Oscar Wilde. As in many of his other works, he frequently makes use of word play, puns and double entendres, coining words like "gloominati", "scabaret sacrilegends", "vivi-sex symbol", "cocaingels", "mOBSCENE", "vodevil" and "para-noir".
Promotion[edit]
On May 12, 2003, a unique launch party took place at The Key Club in Los Angeles, to celebrate the album's release. On May 16, 2003, Marilyn Manson appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, performing "mOBSCENE" and "This Is the New Shit" to an audience of eager fans. A film called "A Grotesque Evening with Marilyn Manson" was released in Spain to promote the album.
Two singles were released from the album, "mOBSCENE" and "This Is the New Shit", the former topping the charts in Belgium and peaking within the top 10 in a dozen other countries. A controversial music video was independently produced for the song "(s)AINT". Directed by Asia Argento and containing scenes of violence, nudity, masturbation, drug-use and self-mutilation, Interscope Records refused to be associated with the work and blocked any possibility of a conventional release, cancelling plans to release "(s)AINT" as the album's third single. A limited run of DVD's were briefly available to purchase on the band's official website, and it was later included on international editions of the Lest We Forget: The Best Of bonus DVD.



 Performing live in 2003.
Grotesk Burlesk Tour[edit]
Main article: Grotesk Burlesk Tour
Grotesk Burlesk was the ninth tour Marilyn Manson embarked on under management of major record label Interscope Records. Beginning on April 11, 2003, and lasting until January 3, 2004, the tour included eight legs, spanning Eurasia, Japan and North America, with a total of 105 completed shows out of the 109 planned.[11]
Much of the elaborate attire and clothing worn by Manson on the tour was tailored by French fashion designer and grand couturier Jean-Paul Gaultier.[12][13]
The stage was designed to resemble that of the classic vaudeville and burlesque stage shows of the 1930s, a prevalent motif found in the album itself. Encompassing this theme most notably were two live dancers dressed in vintage burlesque costume who would be present on stage for most of the show, they danced for "mOBSCENE" and "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)", and performed piano for "The Golden Age of Grotesque" and floor toms for "Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag". They also appeared during performances of "Para-noir". Dressed as if they were conjoined, they accompanied Manson as he was elevated some 12 metre (39 ft) above the stage, much like during performances of "Cruci-Fiction in Space" on the Guns, God and Government tour. The stage also utilized a series of platforms. Manson would sing at a podium for performances of "The Fight Song", donning blackface while wearing an Allgemeine SS-style peaked police cap or, alternatively, Mickey Mouse ears. During performances of "The Dope Show", Manson would wear elongated arms designed by Rudy Coby, which he would swing in a marching manner as he walked along the stage. At the end of each performance of "The Golden Age of Grotesque", Manson played saxophone—a rare instance of the vocalist playing a live instrument in concert.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]




"The Golden Age of Grotesque"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque


"Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag"







Album version, as it appeared on The Golden Age of Grotesque

Problems playing these files? See media help.

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic (60/100)[14]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[15]
Alternative Press 8/10 stars[16]
BBC Music (favorable)[17]
Drowned in Sound 7/10 stars[18]
Entertainment Weekly (B-)[19]
The Guardian 3/5 stars[20]
Mojo 3/5 stars[21]
Popmatters (3/10)[22]
Q 3/5 stars[23]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[24]
Critical response to The Golden Age of Grotesque was mixed. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album has received an average score of 60, indicating mixed or average reviews, based on 12 publications.[14] Although ending up in many critics' 'best of' lists for 2003, other critics consider this Manson's weakest album, arguing that it lacks originality and thoughtful lyrics compared to its predecessors.
Many of the positive reviews focused heavily on the album's production,[14] with Q magazine stating that "Grotesque rocks like a bastard,"[23] along with Alternative Press who commented that "the army of noise behind his bitterness is at once massive and impressive," awarding the album an 8/10 score.[16] Stephen Thomas Erlewine, in an overwhelmingly positive review for AllMusic, praised the album's "thudding metallic grind," describing it as "light and nimble, even though it's drenched in distortion and screams." Erlewine also opined that "[...] in an era when heavy rockers have no idea what happened in the '80s, much less the '30s, it's hard not to warm to this, even if his music isn't your own personal bag," before summarizing that "unlike in the past, Manson isn't taking himself so seriously. It all adds up to a very good album—maybe not his best, and certainly not one that will attract the most attention, but it's a hell of a lot grander than what his peers are producing, and holds its own with his previous records. It's also a bit more fun, too, and that counts for a lot."[15] Barry Walters of Rolling Stone commented that "Marilyn Manson really should be sucking by now. What's surprising is that there's still so much life in what Manson is rehashing. [...] The album loses momentum as the songs slow and dull down, but the first half of Grotesque shines brighter than it should."[24]
Commercial performance[edit]
In the United States, The Golden Age of Grotesque was met with modest commercial success. The album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 album chart, with 118,000 copies sold its first week — just 1,000 more than the opening week sales tally of previous album Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), which debuted at No. 13 — and was the lowest selling No. 1 debut of the year.[25] As of November 2008, the album had sold 526,000 copies in the U.S.,[26] but has yet to be accredited with a certification from the RIAA. On its second week of release, the album reached No. 1 on the Canadian Albums Chart.[27]
In contrast, the album was, by far, Manson's most successful release in Europe, peaking within the top five in most of the major European markets. The set reached No. 1 in five countries — Austria, Belgium (Wallonia), Germany, Italy and Switzerland — while also reaching the top five in Belgium (Flanders), France, Norway, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom.[28][29] In France, where the set peaked at No. 2, the album was awarded a gold certification from the Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique for shipments of over 100,000 units.[30] The album has sold over 120,000 copies in the region.[31] The album received a gold certification from Germany's BVMI under previous criteria which awarded gold certifications to albums that shipped in excess of 250,000 units, as opposed to the current level of 100,000 units.[32] The set also attained gold status in Austria,[33] Switzerland[34] and the UK,[35] indicating shipments of 10,000, 20,000 & 100,000 units respectively.
In Australia and New Zealand, The Golden Age of Grotesque debuted at No. 5 and No. 16 on the official charts, respectively.[28][36] The album was certified gold in Australia by the ARIA, indicating shipments of 35,000 units.[37]
According to MTV Spain, the album has sold 4 million copies worldwide.[38]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson.

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Thaeter"   Gacy, Manson, Sköld 1:14
2. "This Is the New Shit"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 4:20
3. "mOBSCENE"   John 5, Manson 3:25
4. "Doll-Dagga Buzz-Buzz Ziggety-Zag"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 4:11
5. "Use Your Fist and Not Your Mouth"   John 5, Manson 3:34
6. "The Golden Age of Grotesque"   John 5, Manson 4:05
7. "(s)AINT"   John 5, Manson, Sköld 3:42
8. "Ka-Boom Ka-Boom"   John 5, Sköld 4:02
9. "Slutgarden"   John 5, Manson 4:06
10. "♠" (Sometimes known as "Spade") John 5 4:34
11. "Para-noir"   John 5, Gacy, Manson, Sköld 6:01
12. "The Bright Young Things"   John 5 4:19
13. "Better of Two Evils"   John 5, Gacy, Manson, Sköld 3:48
14. "Vodevil"   John 5, Sköld 4:39
15. "Obsequey (The Death of Art)"   Manson, Sköld 1:34

[show]Bonus Tracks









   
   
   
Charts and certifications[edit]

Album charts[edit]

Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[28] 5
Austria (Ö3)[28] 1
Belgium (Flanders) (Ultratop 50)[29] 4
Belgium (Wallonia) (Ultratop)[29] 1
Canada (CANOE)[27] 1
Denmark (Tracklisten)[28] 6
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[28] 8
France (SNEP)[28] 2
Germany (Media Control)[28] 1
Hungary (Mahasz)[39] 28
Ireland (IRMA)[28] 7
Italy (FIMI)[28] 1
Japan (Oricon)[40] 5
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[28] 14
New Zealand (RIANZ)[36] 16
Norway (VG-Lista)[28] 4
Poland (ZPAV)[28] 18
Portugal (AFP)[28] 4
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[28] 7
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[28] 4
Switzerland (Hitparade)[28] 1
United Kingdom (OCC)[28] 4
United States Billboard 200[28] 1

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Australia ARIA Gold[37] 35,000+ —
Austria IFPI Gold[33] 10,000+ —
France SNEP Gold[30] 100,000+ 120,000+[31]
Germany BVMI Gold[32] 250,000+ —
Switzerland IFPI Gold[34] 20,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[35] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA —[A] — 526,000+[26]
Notes
A^ Despite selling enough copies as of November 2008 to be certified gold in the United States, the album has yet to be accredited with a certification from the RIAA.

Chart procession and succession[edit]
Preceded by
Dalla pace del mare lontano by Sergio Cammariere Italian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 16, 2003–May 30, 2003 Succeeded by
Sono io, l'uomo della storia accanto by Claudio Baglioni
Preceded by
American Life by Madonna Swiss Albums Chart number-one album
 May 25, 2003–June 1, 2003 Succeeded by
The Matrix Reloaded (OST) by Various Artists
Preceded by
Aufwind by Seer Austrian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 28, 2003–June 4, 2003 Succeeded by
Nena feat. Nena - Live by Nena
Preceded by
Body Kiss by The Isley Brothers feat. Ronald Isley Billboard 200 number-one album
 May 31, 2003–June 7, 2003 Succeeded by
14 Shades of Grey by Staind
Preceded by
Come Away With Me by Norah Jones Canadian Albums Chart number-one album
 May 31, 2003–June 7, 2003 Succeeded by
Deftones by Deftones
Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

"mOBSCENE" Australia[41] 31
Austria[41] 15
Belgium (Wallonia)[42] 1
Canada[43] 7
Denmark[41] 7
Finland[41] 16
France[41] 61
Germany[41] 20
Hungary[39] 6
Ireland[41] 27
Italy[41] 9
Netherlands[42] 84
New Zealand[41] 32
Norway[41] 20
Sweden[41] 18
Switzerland[41] 6
United Kingdom[41] 13
U.S. Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[43] 26
Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[43] 18
Billboard Hot 100 Singles Sales[44] 5

Single
Chart (2003)
Peak
 position

"This Is the New Shit" Australia[45] 31
Austria[45] 24
France[45] 75
Germany[45] 25
Ireland[45] 50
Sweden[45] 59
Switzerland[45] 44
United Kingdom[45] 29

Release history[edit]

Region
Date
Label
Format
Catalog
Mexico May 5, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800078
Germany May 12, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc —
North America May 13, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 37002
United Kingdom May 13, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800065
Australia May 19, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc 9800065
Japan June 17, 2003 Interscope Records Compact disc UICS 1050
Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[46]Marilyn Manson – vocals, piano, synth-bass, mellotron, saxophone, guitar, loops, editing, melody arrangement, producer, composer
John 5 – guitar, rhythm guitar, piano, orchestration, composer
Tim Sköld – bass, guitar, accordion, keyboards, producer, loops, artwork, digital editing, drum programming, synth-bass, electronics, beats, composer
Madonna Wayne Gacy – composer, editing, electronics, loops, melody arrangement, synthesizer, keyboards, live keyboards
Ginger Fish – drums, rhythm direction

Production[46]Chuck Bailey – assistant engineer
Tom Baker – mastering
Jon Blaine – hair stylist
Blumpy – digital editing
Jeff Burns – assistant
Ross Garfield – drum technician
Lily & Pat – vocals (mOBSCENE & Para-noir)
Ben Grosse – producer, engineer, digital editing, mixing
Mark Williams – A&R
Gottfried Helnwein – art direction

References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ METEOR SHOWERS AND LAP DANCE. MarilynManson.com. Marilyn Manson. November 2001.
2.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson files countersuit against ex-bandmate Stephen Bier". SIDE-LINE.com. December 25, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
3.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Shocking New Images Revealed". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (941). 2003-02-08.
4.Jump up ^ Helnwein, Gottfried (2003-09-01). "Album Covers That Never Were". Gottfried Helnwein. Retrieved 2011-05-02.
5.Jump up ^ "The Golden Age of Grotesque". mansonwiki.com. September 26, 2007. Retrieved April 27, 2012.[dead link]
6.Jump up ^ "The Golden Age of Grotesque [Limited Edition]". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-18.
7.Jump up ^ "Interview with Marilyn Manson The Golden Age". Helnwein-music.com. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
8.Jump up ^ Winwood, Ian (2002-03-23). "Paranoia, Jail Sentences, September 11 and Kittens?". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group).
9.Jump up ^ "The RU Sirius Show » Show #49: The Hipster Whores of Weimar Germany: Mel Gordon pt. 2". Rusiriusradio.com. 2006-06-20. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
10.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Iomusic News. Retrieved 2008-01-25.
11.Jump up ^ "Grotesk Burlesk (tour)". Retrieved 2011-08-25.
12.Jump up ^ "For The Record: Quick News On Marilyn Manson And Jean Paul Gaultier, Bone Crusher, Cam'ron, Pearl Jam, Jimi Hendrix & More". MTV News. 2003-04-28. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
13.Jump up ^ "Fashion Rocks Red Carpet". Style Magazine. Archived from the original on 2007-10-16. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
14.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson - The Golden Age Of Grotesque". Metacritic. Retrieved September 3, 2013.
15.^ Jump up to: a b Allmusic Review Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
16.^ Jump up to: a b Alternative Press. Jul 2003 issue. p. 117. Check date values in: |date= (help)
17.Jump up ^ BBC Music Review BBC.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
18.Jump up ^ Price, Dale (2003-05-20). "Drowned In Sound Review". Drowned in Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-12.
19.Jump up ^ Greer, Jim (May 16, 2003). The Golden Age Of Grotesque Review. Entertainment Weekly. p. 72. Retrieved 2012-03-14.
20.Jump up ^ The Guardian Review Guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
21.Jump up ^ Mojo. Jun 2003 issue. p. 100. Check date values in: |date= (help)
22.Jump up ^ Hreha, Scott (2003-08-26). "Marilyn Manson: The Golden Age of Grotesque". popmatters.com. Retrieved 2013-09-06.
23.^ Jump up to: a b Q magazine. June 2003 issue. p. 103. Check date values in: |date= (help)
24.^ Jump up to: a b Walter, Barry (2003-05-06). "Rolling Stone Review". RollingStone.com. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
25.Jump up ^ Manson Golden at Number One RollingStone.com. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
26.^ Jump up to: a b Grein, Paul. "The 25 Worst-Selling #1 Albums" Yahoo! Music. Retrieved 2008-11-21.
27.^ Jump up to: a b Marilyn Manson biography XR100. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
28.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Album Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
29.^ Jump up to: a b c "Discography Marilyn Manson". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
30.^ Jump up to: a b Les Certifications DisqueEnFrance.com. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
31.^ Jump up to: a b French Gold Certification with exact sales figure InfoDisc.fr. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
32.^ Jump up to: a b "Gold/Platin Datenbank Deutschland". IFPI.de. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
33.^ Jump up to: a b "Gold/Platin Datenbank Österreichischen". IFPI.at. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
34.^ Jump up to: a b "The Official Swiss Charts & Music Community". SwissCharts.com. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
35.^ Jump up to: a b "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search" BPI.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
36.^ Jump up to: a b "New Zealand Chart Positions". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
37.^ Jump up to: a b "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2003 Albums". ARIA.com.au. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
38.Jump up ^ Biografía de Marilyn Manson MTV.es. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
39.^ Jump up to: a b "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
40.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson album sales ranking". Oricon. Retrieved June 22, 2012.
41.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m mOBSCENE Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
42.^ Jump up to: a b "mOBSCENE Chart Statistics II". Hung Medien. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c Allmusic Charts & Awards Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2011-01-05.
44.Jump up ^ Billboard Hot 100 Single Sales Chart Books.Google.ie. Retrieved 2011-08-25.
45.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h This Is The New Shit Chart Statistics aCharts.us. Retrieved 2011-02-10.
46.^ Jump up to: a b "The Golden Age of Grotesque credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-05-23.


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Remix & Repent

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Remix & Repent

EP by Marilyn Manson

Released
November 25, 1997
Recorded
1997
Genre
Industrial metal, post-industrial
Length
24:29
Label
Nothing / Interscope
Marilyn Manson chronology

Antichrist Superstar
 (1996) Remix & Repent
 (1997) Mechanical Animals
 (1998)


Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
Allmusic 2.5/5 stars[1]
Remix & Repent is a five-track EP from the Rock band Marilyn Manson.
It was released on November 25, 1997 during their Antichrist Superstar period. It features remixes of songs from Antichrist Superstar, live tracks recorded during the Dead to the World tour, and an acoustic version of "Man That You Fear".[2]
Track listing[edit]
1."The Horrible People"
2."The Tourniquet Prosthetic Dance Mix" (Edit)
3."Dried Up, Tied and Dead to the World" (Live in Utica, NY)
4."Antichrist Superstar" (Live in Hartford, CT)
5."Man That You Fear" (Acoustic Requiem for Antichrist Superstar)
Chart positions[edit]

Chart (1997)
Peak
 position
Australian Albums Chart[3] 50
Canadian Albums Chart[4] 69
Finnish Albums Chart[5] 18
UK Albums Chart[6] 163
The Billboard 200[7] 102
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ Allmusic review
2.Jump up ^ "Scans: Marilyn Manson, The Toasters, Dr. Octagon, The Ramones". VH1. 1997-12-01. Retrieved 2011-05-29.
3.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Australian Charts". australian-charts.com.
4.Jump up ^ "Top Albums/CDs - Volume 66, No. 14, December 08 1997". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved May 4, 2013.
5.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Finnish Charts". finnishcharts.com.
6.Jump up ^ Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M - My Vitriol". Zobbel.
7.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson > Charts & Awards > Billboard Albums". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation.


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Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
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 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
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 Ginger Fish ·
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 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
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 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band) albums
1997 EPs
1997 remix albums
Remix EPs
Interscope Records remix albums
Interscope Records EPs




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Remix & Repent

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


Remix & Repent

EP by Marilyn Manson

Released
November 25, 1997
Recorded
1997
Genre
Industrial metal, post-industrial
Length
24:29
Label
Nothing / Interscope
Marilyn Manson chronology

Antichrist Superstar
 (1996) Remix & Repent
 (1997) Mechanical Animals
 (1998)


Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
Allmusic 2.5/5 stars[1]
Remix & Repent is a five-track EP from the Rock band Marilyn Manson.
It was released on November 25, 1997 during their Antichrist Superstar period. It features remixes of songs from Antichrist Superstar, live tracks recorded during the Dead to the World tour, and an acoustic version of "Man That You Fear".[2]
Track listing[edit]
1."The Horrible People"
2."The Tourniquet Prosthetic Dance Mix" (Edit)
3."Dried Up, Tied and Dead to the World" (Live in Utica, NY)
4."Antichrist Superstar" (Live in Hartford, CT)
5."Man That You Fear" (Acoustic Requiem for Antichrist Superstar)
Chart positions[edit]

Chart (1997)
Peak
 position
Australian Albums Chart[3] 50
Canadian Albums Chart[4] 69
Finnish Albums Chart[5] 18
UK Albums Chart[6] 163
The Billboard 200[7] 102
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ Allmusic review
2.Jump up ^ "Scans: Marilyn Manson, The Toasters, Dr. Octagon, The Ramones". VH1. 1997-12-01. Retrieved 2011-05-29.
3.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Australian Charts". australian-charts.com.
4.Jump up ^ "Top Albums/CDs - Volume 66, No. 14, December 08 1997". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved May 4, 2013.
5.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Finnish Charts". finnishcharts.com.
6.Jump up ^ Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M - My Vitriol". Zobbel.
7.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson > Charts & Awards > Billboard Albums". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation.


[hide]
v ·
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Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
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 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: Marilyn Manson (band) albums
1997 EPs
1997 remix albums
Remix EPs
Interscope Records remix albums
Interscope Records EPs




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Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
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Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search


Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
November 13, 2000
Recorded
1999–2000
Death Valley, California
The Mansion (Laurel Canyon, California)
Genre
Industrial metal, alternative metal
Length
68:07
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Marilyn Manson, Dave Sardy
Marilyn Manson chronology

The Last Tour on Earth
 (1999) Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
 (2000) The Golden Age of Grotesque
 (2003)


Singles from Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
1."Disposable Teens"
 Released: November 7, 2000
2."The Fight Song"
 Released: February 2, 2001
3."The Nobodies"
 Released: October 6, 2001

Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) is the fourth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson, released in November 2000 by Nothing and Interscope Records. The album marked a return to the industrial and alternative metal styles of the band's earlier efforts, after the modernized glam rock of Mechanical Animals. As their first release following the Columbine High School massacre of April 20, 1999, Holy Wood was Marilyn Manson's rebuttal to accusations leveled against them in the wake of the shootings. The band's frontman, Marilyn Manson, described the record as "a declaration of war".[1]
A rock opera concept album, it is the final installment in a trilogy which includes Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals. After its release, Manson said that the overarching story within the trilogy is presented in reverse chronological order; Holy Wood, therefore, begins the narrative.[2] It was written in the singer's former home in the Hollywood Hills and recorded in several undisclosed locations, including Death Valley and Laurel Canyon.
At its release, Holy Wood received mixed-to-positive reviews; many critics noted that while ambitious, it fell short in execution. The album was not at first as commercially successful as the group's two previous releases, and took three years to receive a gold certification from the RIAA. Nevertheless, with worldwide sales of over nine million copies as of 2011, it has become one of the most successful of their career. It spawned three singles and an abandoned film project which was modified into the as-yet-unreleased Holy Wood novel. Marilyn Manson supported the album with the controversial Guns, God and Government Tour.
On November 10, 2010, British rock magazine Kerrang! published a 10th-anniversary commemorative piece in which they called the album "Manson's finest hour ... A decade on, there has still not been as eloquent and savage a musical attack on the media and mainstream culture ... [It is] still scathingly relevant [and] a credit to a man who refused to sit and take it, but instead come out swinging."[1]


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and development
2 Recording and production 2.1 Novel and film
3 Concept 3.1 Themes
4 Composition
5 Promotion
6 Release 6.1 Singles
6.2 Cover and packaging
6.3 Formats
7 Reception 7.1 From critics
7.2 Sales
7.3 Accolades
7.4 Legacy
8 Guns, God and Government Tour
9 Track listing
10 Charts and certifications 10.1 Album charts
10.2 Certifications
10.3 Singles
11 Credits and personnel
12 References
13 External links

Background and development
Further information: Columbine High School massacre and Rock Is Dead Tour



Ninety-nine was a pivotal year — as was 1969, the year of my birth. The two years share many similarities. Woodstock '99 [where rape and mass looting were rife], became an Altamont [the Rolling Stones concert in 1969 where the Hells Angels beat a fan to death] of its own. Columbine became the Manson murders of our generation. Things happened that could've made me want to stop making music. Instead, I decided to come out and really punish everyone for daring to fuck with me. I've got a big fight ahead of me on this one. And I want every bit of it.
—Marilyn Manson[3]
During the 1990s Marilyn Manson and his eponymous band established themselves as one of the most controversial rock acts in music history.[4] The band became a household name with the mainstream success of their albums, Antichrist Superstar (1996) and Mechanical Animals (1998).[4] By the time of their Rock Is Dead Tour in 1999, the band's outspoken frontman had become a culture war iconoclast and a rallying icon for alienated youth.[4]
As their popularity increased the transgressive, confrontational nature of the group's music and imagery angered social conservatives.[5] Politicians across the political spectrum lobbied to have their performances banned, citing rumors that the shows contained animal sacrifices, bestiality and rape.[4] Their concerts were picketed by religious advocates and parent groups, who contended that their music had a corrupting influence on youth culture by inciting "rape, murder, blasphemy and suicide".[5]
On April 20, 1999, Columbine High School students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold shot 12 students and a teacher to death, wounding 21 others before committing suicide.[6] In the aftermath of the fourth-deadliest school shooting in United States history, the band became a scapegoat.[1][6] Early media reports alleged that the shooters were fans of the band and wore the group's t-shirts during the massacre.[7][8] Speculation in national media and among the public blamed Manson's music and imagery for inciting Harris and Klebold.[1][9] Later reports revealed that the two considered the band "a joke".[7][10] Despite this, the group (and other bands and popular entertainment, such as movies and video games) were widely criticized by religious, political and entertainment-industry figures.[3][11][12]
Under mounting pressure in the days after Columbine, the group postponed their last five North American tour dates out of respect for the victims and their families.[13] On April 29 ten US senators (led by Sam Brownback of Kansas) sent a letter to Edgar Bronfman Jr., president of Seagrams (which owned Interscope Records), requesting a voluntary halt to his company's distribution to children of "music that glorifies violence".[14][15] The letter named Marilyn Manson (and other bands) for producing songs which "eerily reflect" the actions of Harris and Klebold.[14][15] Later that day, the band canceled their remaining North American shows.[16] On May 1 Manson published a Rolling Stone op-ed response to the accusations, "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?"[17][18] In it, he wrote:

I chose not to jump into the media frenzy and defend myself, though I was begged to be on every single TV show in existence. I didn't want to contribute to these fame-seeking journalists and opportunists looking to fill their churches or to get elected [during the US general election of 2000] because of their self-righteous finger-pointing. They want to blame entertainment? Isn't religion the first real entertainment? People dress up in costumes, sing songs and dedicate themselves to eternal fandom ... I'd like [the] media commentators to ask themselves, because their coverage of [Columbine] was some of the most gruesome entertainment any of us have seen.[19]
On May 4, a hearing on the marketing and distribution of violent content to minors by the television, music, film and video-game industries was held by the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.[20] The committee heard testimony from "cultural observers" (such as William Bennett and the Archbishop of Denver, Charles J. Chaput), professors and mental-health professionals.[20] Speakers criticized the band, its label-mate Nine Inch Nails and the 1999 film The Matrix for their alleged contribution to a cultural environment enabling violence such as the Columbine shootings.[20] The committee requested that the Federal Trade Commission and the United States Department of Justice investigate the entertainment industry's marketing practices to minors.[20][21]
Concluding the European and Japanese legs of their tour on August 8, 1999, the band withdrew from public view.[1][2] The album's early development coincided with Manson's three-month seclusion at his home in the Hollywood Hills,[2] during which he considered how to respond to the accusations.[1] Manson said the maelstrom made him reevaluate his career: "[t]here was a bit of trepidation, [in] deciding, 'Is it worth it? Are people understanding what I'm trying to say? Am I even gonna be allowed to say it?' Because I definitely had every single door shut in my face ... there were not a lot of people who stood behind me."[2][3] He told Alternative Press he felt his safety was threatened to the point that he "could be shot Mark David Chapman-style".[2] Manson concluded that it was unwise for a controversial artist to allow his detractors to scapegoat his work (and popular entertainment in general), beginning work on the album as a counterattack.[1][22]
Recording and production
Manson began writing for the album in 1995, before the release of Antichrist Superstar;[23] the material initially consisted of scattered ideas.[24] Isolating himself in his attic, he worked the early material into a usable shape.[25][26] At the end of Manson's three-month retreat, the band embarked on a year of writing and developing the material.[1][22][27] Band members maintained a low profile, and Manson said the band's website would "be my only contact with humanity".[28]



I'm at that point in my career where I wanted to make this film and I'm making this new record, where I really examine suffering and where celebrities come from. How it all kind of traces back in religion, and celebrities and Hollywood all kind of relate to each other. And that's very American.
—Marilyn Manson[29]
The album is the group's most collaborative effort to date, with all members contributing to the songwriting process (resulting in a more-unified sound).[27][30] Most of the work was shouldered by Twiggy Ramirez, John 5 and Marilyn Manson; keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy provided input on "President Dead" and "Cruci-Fiction in Space", and Ginger Fish did the drum work.[1][31] Manson said that his songwriting sessions with John 5 were very focused;[31] most of the songs were complete before being brought to the band for consideration, and were enthusiastically received.[31] In contrast, his sessions with Ramirez were less demanding as they experimented with absinthe.[31] The band wrote 100 musical fragments; between 25 and 30 became songs,[31] and 19 were selected for the album.[32]

White symbol inside a white circle on a black background

 Stylized version of the alchemical symbol for mercury, used by the band as a logo for the album and the character of Adam Kadmon[33]
The album was recorded at several locations, including Death Valley and Rick Rubin's Mansion Studio in Laurel Canyon.[34] Locations were chosen for the atmosphere they were intended to impart to the music.[27] Mixing engineer Dave Sardy co-produced the album with Manson; Bon Harris, of electronic body music group Nitzer Ebb, did the programming and pre-production editing.[28] Manson announced on December 16, 1999 that the album was progressing under a working title of "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death", with its logo the alchemical symbol for mercury.[28][35][36]
The band visited Death Valley a number of times to "imprint the feeling of the desert into [their] minds" and avoid composing artificial-sounding songs.[37] Experimental recordings and acoustic songs were recorded with live instrumentation. Manson later explained that the acoustic songs were "acoustic" in that they were not produced electrically; the album's sonic landscape is intrinsically electronic. Harris' programming skills proved invaluable as the band recorded unique, natural sounds, which he molded into aural elements.[27]
The band spent considerable time at the Mansion Studio, with its cavernous rooms suitable for recording drums.[27] Inspired by the space,[38][39] the band found they could accomplish more there than in the limited environment of Manson's home studio.[27][28] Ramirez later had a fuzzy memory of the sessions,[40] explaining that there were "a lot of different emotions racing around [us]"; the house, which once belonged to Harry Houdini, is said to be haunted.[40] Gacy said that he spent most of his time working on a computer and synthesizer, "mess[ing] around with prime-number loops where they only intersect every three days and I'd check up on what kind of music they'd be making. You never know what's going to happen".[38] Fish worked constantly, and the bulk of his contributions to the recording process were made at the Mansion.[39]
On February 23, 2000 Manson delivered a 20-minute lecture via satellite to a current-events convention, "DisinfoCon 2000", aimed at exposing (and dispelling) disinformation.[41] Six days later, their album was entitled Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death).[23] By April 12 the band was in their final stages of recording, and Manson posted footage of the recording studio.[42] In pre-release interviews, he noted that the record would be "a very sharp pencil" which would appeal to Marilyn Manson fans.[43]
Novel and film
Further information: Holy Wood (novel)
Manson's ambitions for the project initially included an eponymous film exploring the album's backstory.[1][29] In July 1999, he had reportedly begun negotiating with New Line Cinema to produce and distribute the film and its soundtrack.[23] At the 1999 MTV Europe Music Awards in Dublin (where the band performed on November 11),[44] he disclosed the film's title and his production plans.[29] Manson met Chilean avant-garde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky at the event to discuss work on the film, although no final decision was made.[44][45] By February 29, 2000 the deal fell through when Manson had reservations that New Line Cinema would take the film in a direction which would not have "retained his artistic vision".[23]
Abandoning his attempt to bring Holy Wood to the screen, Manson announced plans to publish two books accompanying the album.[23] The first was a "graphic and phantasmagoric" novelization, intended for release shortly after the album by ReganBooks (a division of HarperCollins).[25] The novel's style was inspired by William S. Burroughs, Kurt Vonnegut, Aldous Huxley and Philip K. Dick,[27] and it would be followed by a coffee table book of images created for the project.[23]
In a December 2000 interview with Manson, novelist Chuck Palahniuk mentioned the Holy Wood novel (due for release in spring 2001) and complimented its style.[46] Neither book has yet been released, reportedly due to a publishing dispute.[47]
Concept



"Holy Wood"—which isn't even that great of a hyperbole of America—is a place where an obituary is just another headline. Where if you die and enough people are watching, then you're famous.
—Marilyn Manson, on the album's concept[2]
The album's plot is a "parable"[25] in a thinly-veiled satire of modern America called "Holy Wood", which Manson has described as a city-sized, Disneyesque amusement park where the main attractions are violence and sex.[2][48] Its literary foil is "Death Valley", "a metaphor for the outcast and the imperfect of the world."[49]
The central character is the ill-fated protagonist "Adam Kadmon",[1][23][50] a name borrowed from the Kabbalah which means "primal man". In the similarly-mystical Sufi and Alevi philosophies, he is an archetypical "perfect" or "complete man".[23] Adam Kadmon travels from Death Valley to Holy Wood;[49] idealistic and naïve, he attempts a revolution through music.[49]
Disenchanted when his revolution is consumed by Holy Wood's ideology of "guns, God and government", he is absorbed by its culture of death and fame in which celebrity worship, violence and scapegoating are the moral values of a religion rooted in martyrdom.[1][2][25] In this religion dead celebrities are revered as saints, and John F. Kennedy is idolized as a modern Christ.[3][25][49]
Known as "celebritarianism",[50] Holy Wood's religion parallels Christianity. It critiques the dead-celebrity phenomenon in American culture, with the crucifixion of Jesus as its blueprint.[2][3][25] This concept extended to the world Guns, God and Government Tour supporting the album; the tour's logo was a rifle, with handguns arranged to resemble the Christian cross.[51]
Manson told Rolling Stone that the plot is semi-autobiographical. While it can be viewed on several levels, he said that the simplest interpretation is to see it as a story of an angry youth whose revolution is commercialized, leading him to "destroy the thing he has created, which is himself."[30][34]
Themes
Violence is the central theme of the album,[52] which takes a critical look at America's obsession with firearms, death and fame and their ramifications in the Columbine tragedy.[1] Manson sees the root causes of Columbine as the gun culture, conservative American Christianity and traditional family values. The album illustrates the harmful roles they play in the glorification (and acceptance) of violence in "mainstream" culture,[22][53] illustrated by the slogan "Guns, God and Government".[1][49][54] Drawing similarities between the Cold War period of 1960s America and the 1990s, Manson uses allegories from the former decade and other events and figures in cultural history.[25][46][48][55] Music journalist Charlotte Robinson said that it is difficult to assess the "narrative's effectiveness" without the book and film: "the album doesn't tell much of a story, instead presenting variations on the same themes".[50]



[Holy Wood is] not necessarily [all] about the Columbine incident, but more the reason why it happened ... [It's about] the way America raises its kids to feel like they're unwanted and made to feel like they're dead already. They really don't have anything to live for and it's also concerned with the repercussions of that incident.
—Marilyn Manson, on the album's prevailing theme[49]
Manson was drawn to The Beatles' White Album because of its role in the Charles Manson "Family" murders and the parallels he saw between that crime and Columbine:[3][26][55] "[It] had a lot of very subversive messages on it. Ones they intended and ones that may've [sic] been misinterpreted by [convicted mass murder conspirator] Charles Manson". Manson believes it was the first piece of music blamed for inciting violence: "When you've got 'Helter Skelter' [taken from a Beatles song of the same name] written in blood on someone's wall, it's a little more damning than anything I've been blamed for".[3][26][55] Manson appreciates the record's power, which inspired his album's concept. Holy Wood, he said, "is a tribute to what that record did in history."[3][49][55]
Critics also noted similarities between anti-hero Adam Kadmon and Charles Manson.[3][37][49] Manson echoed this assessment, describing Holy Wood as a declaration of war on the entertainment industry: "their self-congratulatory attitude, their beliefs that they can never do wrong, ... that they're the center of the universe[1] ... [i]n one way it's defending Hollywood, and in another way it's attacking it for not being brave enough".[3][37]
A substantial portion of the album analyzes the cultural role of Jesus Christ and the iconography of his crucifixion as the origin of celebrity,[25][56] appraising "our relationship with Christ, and how we outgrew that".[3] Manson says that while in the past he critiqued religion, with this album he accepts the story and looks for things to which he can relate.[25][27] He discovered that Christ was a revolutionary figure—a person who was killed for having dangerous opinions, and was later exploited and merchandised by Christianity.[25][27] Manson notes the irony of "religious people who indict entertainment as being violent"; the crucifixion is an icon of violence which made Jesus "the first rock star". He feels that the exploitation of Christ as "the first celebrity" made religion the root of all entertainment.[25][56]
Christ's death is compared to Abraham Zapruder's film of the assassination of John F. Kennedy,[26] which Manson called "the only thing that's happened in modern times to equal the crucifixion".[2] He sarcastically described the historic home movie as a "good clip of mankind's generosity to share his violence with the world in such a cinematic way".[57] Manson stresses the film's cultural importance, noting the irony of showing such violence on the news while complaining about violence in the entertainment industry.[25] He watched the clip many times as a child, saying it was the most violent thing he had ever seen[25] and juxtaposing Christ and Kennedy:

Christ was the blueprint for celebrity. He was the first celebrity, or rock star if you want to look at it that way, and [dying on the cross] he became this image of sexuality and suffering. He’s literally marketed—A crucifix is no different than a concert T-shirt in some ways. I think for America, in my lifetime, John F. Kennedy kind of took the place of that [as a modern-day Christ] in some ways. [After being murdered on TV], he became lifted up as this icon and this Christ figure [by America].[58]
Manson also cites John Lennon as an assassinated icon, criticizing the media's veneration of media martyrs and its conversion of death into spectacle to cater to the American public's appetite for violence, tragedy and celebrity. He denies claims that Marilyn Manson's music was responsible for Columbine,[1][3] speculating how the media would have covered the Crucifixion[3] and linking these observations to Columbine during an interview on the O'Reilly Factor. Bill O'Reilly argued that "disturbed kids" without direction from responsible parents could misinterpret the message of his music as endorsing the belief that "when I'm dead [then] everybody's going to know me". Manson responded:

Well, I think that's a very valid point and I think that it's a reflection of, not necessarily this programme but of television in general, that if you die and enough people are watching you become a martyr, you become a hero, you become well known. So when you have these things like Columbine, and you have these kids who are angry and they have something to say and no one's listening, the media sends a message that says if you do something loud enough and it gets our attention then you will be famous for it. Those kids ended up on the cover of Time magazine [twice[N 1]], the media gave them exactly what they wanted. That's why I never did any interviews around that time when I was being blamed for it because I didn't want to contribute to something that I found to be reprehensible.[61]
Despite references to (and fascination with) the iconic men, Manson was reluctant to draw comparisons between them and himself (saying it would have been pretentious):[52] "[w]hat I did find was parallels in their stories and my story, and I tried to maybe learn from their mistakes and what they tried to do ... You realise you can't change the world and you can only change yourself, and I think that's what [they] found out".[52] He added, "[f]or me it was about learning from that and trying to break the evolution of man [since] it's man's nature to be violent".[52]
Composition



Is adult entertainment killing our children? Or is killing our children entertaining adults?
—Statement on the band's website during the Holy Wood era.[35]
In pre-release interviews, Manson said that Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was intended to be the "industrial White Album ... in the sense that it's very experimental. I play a lot of keyboards, we switched things around, wrote in the desert ... it's experimental and when I think of experimental I think of The White Album".[3] The 1969 Rolling Stones album Let It Bleed (another source of inspiration) was written in the same house where Manson wrote Holy Wood.[26]
Sonically, Manson said the record was "arrogant in an art rock sense" and the "heaviest" record the band has done. "It needs to be to complete the trilogy", he said.[3][27][30] Most of the songs have three or four parts (similar to art rock), because of the way the story is told.[27] The band took great care to avoid being "self-indulgent".[27] Manson considers the record entertaining: "Art rock is only self indulgent if it bores you".[27] CMJ New Music Monthly called the songs "angry and complex".[25] Rolling Stone noted that "on such songs as 'Target Audience', 'Disposable Teens' and 'Cruci-Fiction in Space', [the band] dismantles the slick, glam-tinged sound of [Mechanical] Animals in favor of the more brutal industrial-goth grind of his first [two] albums".[34]
Like Antichrist Superstar Holy Wood uses a song cycle structure, dividing the album into four movements—A: In the Shadow, D: The Androgyne, A: Of Red Earth and M: The Fallen—to frame Kadmon's story.[55] The storyline unfolds in a multi-tiered series of metaphors and allusions;[25] for example, the album's title refers not only to the "Hollywood sign" but also to "the tree of knowledge that Adam took the first fruit from when he fell out of paradise, the wood that Christ was crucified on, the wood that [Lee Harvey] Oswald's rifle is made from and the wood that so many coffins are made of".[25]
"GodEatGod" follows Adam as he meditates in the desert.[49] "The Love Song" is an anthem to Holy Wood's religion, Celebritarianism.[49] Manson said the idea for the song came from his observation that "Love Song" is one of the most common titles in music, and he wove in a metaphor about guns: "I was suggesting with the lyrics that the father is the hand, the mother is the gun, and the children are the bullets. Where you shoot them is your responsibility as parents".[53] The chorus is a rhetorical take on an American bumper sticker, which asks "Do you love your God, gun, government?"[49]




"The Love Song"







"The Love Song" applies dark humor to satirize America's concept of traditional family values by drawing parallels to its love affair with guns and violence.[53]

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The UK music magazine Kerrang! described "The Fight Song" as a "playground punk anthem".[43] Manson noted that the song's theme is Adam's desire to be a part of Holy Wood, and the track is autobiographical.[49] Speaking broadly, it is about "a person who's grown up all his life thinking that the grass is greener on the other side, but when he finally [gets there], he realises that it's worse than where he came from and that it's truly exploitative".[49] The line "The death of one is a tragedy, the death of millions is just a statistic" relates to overlooking the deaths of ordinary people, ignored by the media, compared to the media frenzy when someone dies dramatically.[48]
"Disposable Teens" is a "signature Marilyn Manson song",[49] with a bouncing guitar riff and Teutonic, staccato rhythm rooted in glam rocker Gary Glitter's song "Rock and Roll, Pt.2".[62] Its lyrical themes tackle the disenfranchisement of contemporary youth, "particularly those that have been [brought up] to feel like accidents", with the revolutionary idealism of their parents' generation.[48][49] The Beatles' influence is evident in this song,[26][35][48] whose chorus echoes the disillusionment of their White Album song "Revolution 1".[35][48] Here, the sentiment is a rallying cry for "disposable teens" against "this so-called generation of revolutionaries" indicted in the song: "You said you wanted evolution, the ape was a great big hit. You say want a revolution, man, and I say that you're full of shit".[35][48] Manson singles out "Target Audience (Narcissus Narcosis)" as his favorite song on the album; to him, it describes every person's desire for self-actualization.[49][63]
Borrowing a riff from English alternative rock band Radiohead,[43] "President Dead" is a guitar-driven song showcasing John 5's technical skill.[43] It opens with a sample of Don Gardiner's ABC News Radio broadcast announcing the death of John F. Kennedy.[48] The song is 3:13 long — a deliberate numerological reference to frame 313 of the Zapruder film, the frame with Kennedy's fatal head shot and the point at which JFK became an American media martyr "because the production value of his murder was so grand; the cinematography was so well done".[48] "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death" is an introspective song with Adam at his most emotionally vulnerable, nearly despairing.[48] "Cruci-Fiction in Space" further explores the Kennedy assassination, concluding that human beings have evolved from monkeys to men to guns.[25] "A Place in the Dirt" is another personal song, characterized by Adam's self-analysis of his place in Holy Wood.[43]




"Lamb of God"







Using the assassinations of Jesus Christ, JFK, and John Lennon as examples, in "Lamb of God" Manson criticizes his accusers by illustrating their hunger for venerating dead people into martyrs and superstars and for turning tragedy into televised spectacle.[1][50]

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"The Nobodies" is a mournful, elegiac dirge with a harpsichord and synthesized-drum introduction.[25][43] The verse "today I'm dirty and I want to be pretty, tomorrow I know I'm just dirt" has an Iggy Pop-style vocal delivery building to the adrenaline-fuelled chorus: "we are the nobodies, we wanna be somebodies, when we're dead they'll know just who we are. Some children died the other day, we fed machines and then we prayed, puked up and down in morbid faith, you should have seen the ratings that day".[6][25][43] CMJ noted that the song would be interpreted by some as a tribute to the Columbine shooters, but its point was not to glorify violence; rather, it was to depict a society drenched in its children's blood.[25] "The Death Song" is the turning point for Adam; he no longer cares.[48] Manson described it as sarcastic and nihilistic: "it's like 'We have no future and we don't give a fuck'".[48] Kerrang! described it as one of the album's "heaviest" songs.[43]
In "Lamb of God" Manson uses the examples of the assassinations of Jesus Christ, JFK and John Lennon to criticize his accusers, illuminating their hunger for venerating dead people as martyrs and superstars and for turning tragedy into televised spectacle.[1][50] The bridge paraphrases the chorus of "Across the Universe".[26] Manson notes that although John Lennon sang "nothing's going to change my world", "[Lennon's killer] Mark David Chapman came along and proved him very wrong. That was always something, growing up, that was very sad and tragic to me—a song that I always identified with".[26] "Burning Flag" is a heavy-metal song reminiscent of American industrial-metal band Ministry.[43] Lennon's "Working Class Hero" was covered between the band's August 30, 2000 appearance at the Kerrang! Awards and the November 14 launch of the album.[26][62][64] Describing Lennon's idealism and influence, Manson said "some of Lennon's Communist sentiments in his music later in his life were very dangerous. I think he died because of it. I don't think his death was any sort of accident. Aside from that, I think he's one of my favorite songwriters of all time".[62]
Promotion
Promotion began on June 9, 1999, with a web update that Manson was composing for a new album in tandem with a screenplay.[28][65] On December 16 he posted a four-minute video clip and written statement, elaborating on the upcoming album's themes and featuring excerpts of the band performing two new songs.[35] The first cut was a rock song which later became "Disposable Teens", and the second was a rough demo cover of the ballad "Little Child" known as "Mommy Dear".[35] Manson described the album as "the most violent yet beautiful creation we have accomplished. This is a soundtrack for a world that is being sold to kids and then being destroyed by them. But maybe that's exactly what it deserves".[28][35] An acoustic version of "Sick City", from Charles Manson's 1970 album Lie: The Love and Terror Cult, later appeared on February 14, 2000;[66] however, this song was not intended to be included in the upcoming album or the Holy Wood feature film.[66]
On April 12, 2000 Manson wrote that they were completing the final stages of recording and posted a downloadable, silent movie documenting the process.[42] This was followed on August 9 with a posting of the Holy Wood novel cover and a sound clip of "The Love Song" the following day.[67] On August 25 he released three tracks ("Burning Flag", "Cruci-Fiction in Space" and "The Love Song") for digital download on their website.[33] Manson traveled to the UK to perform "Disposable Teens" on the October 12, 2000 episode of BBC One's Top of the Pops.[68] On October 27, the band launched their worldwide Guns, God and Government Tour.[54][69] Video footage and photographs from shows at the Minneapolis Orpheum Theatre and the Milwaukee Eagles Ballroom (showing them performing "Disposable Teens" and "The Fight Song") were posted on the band's website November 2.[70]
From November 1 to November 13, the UK division of Nothing/Interscope Records held a contest to promote the album and launch the UK version of the band's website. The contest invited fans to log onto the site daily to pick up a series of coded clues which led to a message linked to the album. Fans who solved the riddle received an exclusive download, and were entered into a drawing for a one-week trip for two to meet Manson in Hollywood, California.[71]
In mid-2001, Universal Music Group was criticized for airing commercials promoting the album on MTV's Total Request Live.[72] Manson suspected that Senator and former Democratic vice-presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman played a role in the criticism.[72] Lieberman had recently introduced the Media Marketing Accountability Act (banning the marketing of violent and sexually-explicit media to minors) in Congress.[73][74] The proposed legislation stemmed from a Federal Trade Commission investigation he and Senators Sam Brownback and Orrin Hatch requested from US President Bill Clinton at the May 4, 1999 Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation hearing on entertainment-industry marketing practices to minors.[20][21][75][76]
Release



This is the final piece of a triptych that I began with Antichrist Superstar. The character of Omēga [from Mechanical Animals] has been disposed of, as he was a ruse to lure the commercial mall-goers into the web of destruction that I've always planned since the beginning.
—Marilyn Manson[28]
On February 29, 2000, Manson confirmed that the album was on track for a fall 2000 release.[23] On August 2, the singer announced a new release date of October 24 and posted a draft of the track listing. Manson then began posting weekly updates on the website, giving fans free access to previews of new songs and artwork.[77] On August 25, the track listing was released.[33]
On September 18, Manson announced that the album's US release was postponed to November 14 (to fine-tune the final mix) and its first single would be "Disposable Teens".[26][49][78] The album was released on November 13, 2000 in the UK and on December 5 in Japan by Nothing and Interscope Records.[79]
On the evening of November 14, 2000, Manson, Ramirez, and John 5 took a break from the tour to celebrate the album with a brief invitation-only acoustic set at the Saci nightclub in New York City. Tickets were given out in radio contests, on the band's website and to the first 100 album buyers at Tower Records on Broadway in New York. The set consisted of four songs, including a cover of John Lennon's "Working Class Hero" and "Suicide Is Painless", theme of the film (and TV series) M*A*S*H. Manson noted that the latter song "[was] far more depressing than anything I could have ever written".[64][80] The following day, he appeared on Total Request Live in a segment entitled "Mothers Against Marilyn Manson".[80] The band performed "Disposable Teens" on MTV's New Year's Eve celebration (with a cover of Cheap Trick's "Surrender") and on January 8, 2001 at the American Music Awards.[81][82]
Singles
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) spawned three singles, the first two of which were released in three versions. The first, "Disposable Teens", debuted as a music video (directed by Samuel Bayer)[71][83] on Total Request Live October 25, 2000.[71][83] During the following weeks, it was released as two standalone single EPs. The first version, "Disposable Teens Pt.1", was released on November 6 in the UK[71][84] and features Manson's cover of "Working Class Hero".[85] It was rereleased as a maxi single in the UK on August 21, 2002.[86] The second version, "Disposable Teens Pt.2", followed on November 14, 2000 and features a cover of "Five to One" by The Doors.[87] This version was released in the UK as a maxi single on October 31, 2000 and a 12" picture disc vinyl EP on November 6.[88][89]
The second single, "The Fight Song", was also released in three versions. The first, "The Fight Song Pt.1", was released on January 29, 2001 in the US and February 19 in the UK;[90][91] the latter was a 12" picture disc vinyl EP.[92] Both feature a remix by Joey Jordison of the heavy metal band Slipknot.[91][93] The second version, "The Fight Song Pt.2", was released on February 2, 2001 in the US and March 6 in the UK.[94][95] The music video was directed by W.I.Z., and sparked controversy for its violent depiction of a football game between jocks and goths (which some thought exploited the Columbine tragedy).[82][90] Manson dismissed the claims as hype: "Flak is my job".[91]
On February 10, 2001 Manson indicated that the "The Nobodies" would be the album's third single.[96][97] The music video, directed by Paul Fedor, premiered on MTV in June.[72] Manson originally wanted to film the video in Russia "because the atmosphere, the desolation, the coldness and the architecture would really suit the song".[96] Another early plan was to incorporate the MTV stunt series Jackass, because the song was included in the show's soundtrack;[72] however, the idea was abandoned when the show drew the ire of Senator Joseph Lieberman.[72] The third single was released on September 3, 2001 in the UK and October 6, 2001 in the US.[98][99] A remixed version of the song later appeared in the 2001 Johnny Depp film From Hell.[100]
Cover and packaging
The album's artwork was designed by P. R. Brown and Marilyn Manson.[43] Manson began conceptualizing it as he wrote the songs, and Brown and Manson worked in tandem to realize the imagery after deciding to do the work themselves.[43] It features elements from alchemy and the tarot.[43]
The symbol for the planet Mercury (common in alchemy) is a logo. Expanding on its relationship to the album's concept, Manson said "It represents both the androgyne and the prima materia, which has been associated with Adam, the first man".[33]
The singer commissioned a redesigned set of fourteen Major Arcana tarot cards, based on the Rider-Waite deck.[46] He explained that his interest in tarot was grounded in an attraction to its symbolism, not divination.[46] The cards depict each member of the band in a surrealistic tableau.[46] Each card was reinterpreted, reflecting the iconography of the album;[43] the Emperor, with prosthetic legs, is sitting in a wheelchair clutching a rifle in front of an American flag; the Fool is stepping off a cliff, with grainy images of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and a JFK campaign poster in the background, and Justice weighs the Bible against the brain on his balance scale.[46] The album's inner sleeve has nine of these cards: the Magician, the Devil, the Emperor, the Hermit, the Fool, Justice, the High Priestess, Death and The Hierophant.[43][46] The remaining cards are the Star, the World, the Tower and the Hanged Man.[46]
The cover art, which portrays Manson as a crucified Christ with his jawbone torn off, is intended as a criticism of censorship and America's obsession with media martyrs.[26] It is a cropped version of the reinterpreted Hanged Man card.[43] Under it is an obscured copy of the coroner's report for John F. Kennedy with the words "clinical record" and "autopsy".[101] The Marilyn Manson typeface uses the same font as the Disney World logo of the 1960s.[48] Manson explained the cover: "I think it's more offensive to Christians for me to say, 'I believe in the story of Christ and I enjoy the images that you present, but for different reasons than you'. I've taken my own interpretation, that's more offensive than Antichrist Superstar, and just completely disvaluing it. I'm going to turn a bunch of kids onto Christianity in my own sick, twisted way".[48]
The cover was controversial; some copies were issued with a cardboard sleeve featuring an alternative cover, since some retailers refused to stock the album with the original artwork.[63][102] A pastor in Memphis, Tennessee threatened to go on a hunger strike unless the album was pulled from shelves.[56] Manson described these actions as attempts at censorship: "the irony is that my point of the photo on the album was to show people that the crucifixion of Christ is, indeed, a violent image. My jaw is missing as a symbol of this very kind of censorship. This doesn't piss me off as much as it pleases me, because those offended by my album cover have successfully proven my point".[1][102] Gigwise ranked the cover 16th on its list of "The 50 Most Controversial Album Covers Of All Time!"[103]
Formats
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was released in three formats. The standard jewel-case CD release has an enhanced CD, a gatefold booklet and a card-stock outer slipcase.[32] The UK limited-edition CD features a bonus acoustic version of "The Nobodies", while the Japanese limited-edition CD has the UK bonus track and a live version of "Mechanical Animals".[104] Universal Music Japan released a remastered version of the album in Super-High-Material CD (SHM-CD) on December 3, 2008 and a limited-edition 10th-anniversary commemorative reissue in 2010.[105][106][107] The vinyl LP release was pressed on two black discs and contained in a gatefold paperboard slipcase.[108] The cassette release contained a single cassette tape, a gatefold booklet and a card-stock outer slipcase.[109] Amazon.com has offered a digital MP3 version since November 14, 2000.[110]
Reception
From critics

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic 72/100[111]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4.5/5 stars[112]
Robert Christgau (dud)[113]
Entertainment Weekly B[114]
Q 4/5 stars[115]
Melody Maker 4/5 stars[116]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[117]
NME 8/10[118]
Drowned in Sound 10/10[119]
PopMatters favorable[50]
Holy Wood received positive reviews from most critics.[120] At Metacritic (which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics) the album received an average score of 72 based on 14 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[120] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic praised it as "the definitive Marilyn Manson album, since it's tuneful and abrasive". He complimented the band for "figur[ing] out [how] to meld the hooks and subtle sonic shading of Mechanical Animals with the ugly, neo-industrial metallicisms of Antichrist [Superstar]", and said that "much of its charm lies in Manson trying so hard, perfecting details ... there's so much effort, Holy Wood winds up a stronger and more consistent album than any of his other work. If there's any problem, it's that Manson's shock rock seems a little quaint in 2000 ...[However,] it's to Warner's [frontman Marilyn Manson] credit as, yes, an artist that Holy Wood works anyway".[112]
Barry Walters of Rolling Stone said, "The band truly rocks: Its malevolent groove fleshes out its leader's usual complaints with an exhilarating swagger that's the essence of rock and roll".[117] LA Weekly was similarly impressed, pointing out that "almost all [the songs] contain a double-take chord change or a textural overdose or a mind-blowing bridge, and they'll be terroristic in concert".[121] Revolver magazine editor Christopher Scapelliti was impressed by the record's earnestness: "For all Holy Wood's well-tempered melodies and drunken pandemonium, what comes across loudest on the album is not the music but the sense of injury expressed in Manson's lyrics. Like Plastic Ono Band, John Lennon's bare-boned solo debut, Holy Wood screams with a primal fury that's evident even in its quietest moments".[31] According to Billboard magazine, the album proved that Manson is "one of the most skilled lyricists in rock today".[121]
Other critics were less impressed. Drowned in Sound (which assigns a normalized rating out of 10) gave the album a score of 10; however, they noted "There [are] a number of criticisms that could come Marilyn Manson's way: too much more of the same, too much philosophical posing, too much sloganeering. Regardless, all this needs to attain perfection is a few minutes shaved off of the overall running time ...[and] lyrically it actually says something intelligent for once and musically it has a lot more variation and scope than the Limp Bizkits of the world".[119] PopMatters agreed: "The central flaw of Holy Wood is that the power of its message, an important and provocative one, is watered down by its artistic pretensions. While Holy Wood is often affecting, it would be a better album if it was shorter and dealt with its subject matter directly, instead of through the veil of the 'concept album'."[50] Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times was also disappointed that Holy Wood did not live up to "the promise of Mechanical Animals". In contrast to Erlewine of Allmusic, he viewed the musical cross-pollination of Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals as confusion on the band's part about "where to turn [musically], as if uncertain which is the right move commercially in a rock world taken over by Limp Bizkit and Eminem". He concluded that "[t]his is music that sounds reasonable on the radio but crumbles under scrutiny".[122] Joshua Klein of The A.V. Club was also unconvinced, remarking that "[this] sort of agitprop is thoroughly predictable, and the only thing that could prove shocking about Manson's antics would be if the singer actually evinced any power over his followers. Here, he seems entranced by his own power, which may be why his dark worldview sounds baseless even as he offers sharp hooks others would kill for".[123]
Sales
Since early critical appraisal of Holy Wood was far less favorable than the band's previous effort, Mechanical Animals, many critics and retailers wondered if the band still had commercial appeal on the early-2000s music scene. Best Buy's 2000 sales projections estimated its first-week sales at about 150,000 units nationally, significantly less than the 223,000 units sold by Mechanical Animals during its first week.[124] In the US the album debuted (and peaked) at No. 13 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 117,000, an initial commercial disappointment.[125]
The album spent 13 consecutive weeks on the charts before dropping off on March 3, 2001, making it the shortest-charting full-length LP by the band until The High End of Low (2009).[126] It was overshadowed by Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals (which spent 52 and 33 weeks on the charts, respectively).[126] The album's sales figures were dismal, and it took three years to attain a gold certification from the RIAA (in March 2003) for shipments of over 500,000 units.[127] However, in four other countries (Australia, Austria, Italy and Sweden) the album peaked in the top 10;[128] in the UK, it peaked at No. 23.[129] As of 2011 the album has sold over nine million copies worldwide, making it one of the most successful in the band's catalogue.[130]
Seventeen months after Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)‍ '​s release, Manson commented on the album's lackluster US sales.[131] He attributed the lack of commercial appeal to the musical climate of the time, but argued that it stood up comparatively well to contemporary rock albums.[131] Manson noted that the band's US sales figures are usually one or two million records, and did not find the sales figures disappointing.[131]
Accolades
In 2001 Kerrang! named Holy Wood the year's best album at their annual Kerrang! Awards.[132] Manson sardonically remarked, "[there is] nothing like a good school shooting to inspire a record" when he collected the award.[133]
Kerrang! ranked Holy Wood ninth on their 2000 list of albums of the year.[134] The British magazine NME ranked the album 34th in their critic's picks for the 50 best albums of 2000 in their "Decade In Music" series, calling it "a series of heroic rallying cries for the disenfranchised, while also baiting the American Far Right for all it's worth".[135] The album ranked 30th in the Critics Top 50[136] and 9th in the popular poll[137] of the German magazine Musik Express/Sounds in their 2000 Albums of the Year. The French edition of the British magazine Rock Sound ranked Holy Wood 15th in Le choix de la rédaction (the editor's choice) and 5th in Le choix des lecteurs (readers' choice) of their Choix des critiques (critics' choice) of 2000 Albums of the Year.[138] The British magazine Record Collector also ranked the album on their Best of 2000 list.[139]
Legacy
In their November 10, 2010 issue Kerrang! published a 10th-anniversary commemorative article on the album, "Screaming For Vengeance",[1] calling it "Manson's finest hour". "Set against the backdrop of what the rest of the rock and metal world were attempting at the turn of the century—Limp Bizkit were parading their jockishness with Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water and Disturbed were unveiling their contrived anger with The Sickness, for example—it put the singer into a league of his own ...[and] a decade on, there has still not been as eloquent and savage a musical attack on the media and mainstream culture as Manson achieved with Holy Wood ...[It is] still scathingly relevant today ... perhaps that's where Holy Wood achieved its greatest success. In deflecting the attention that was targeted at him back onto the media, they reacted exactly as he knew they would: by blustering and further exposing their own inadequacies ... The shame of it all, though, is that so little has changed. That the album is still so relevant today suggests it failed in its task of changing attitudes. That it exists at all, though, is a credit to a man who refused to sit and take it, but instead come out swinging."[1]
Guns, God and Government Tour
Main article: Guns, God and Government Tour
To promote the album, the band began a worldwide stadium tour (the Guns, God and Government Tour) three days after its scheduled release date and seventeen days before its actual launch.[54][69] From October 27, 2000 to September 2, 2001, the tour had six legs spanning Eurasia, Japan and North America with 107 shows (out of 109 planned).[54] Typical of the band, the concerts were theatrical[69] and lasted an average of one hour and forty minutes. Sets were designed with communist, religious and "Celebritarian" imagery.[140] Manson had a number of costume changes during each show: a bishop's dalmatic and mitre (often confused with papal regalia); a costume made from animals (including epaulettes made from a horse's tail and a shirt made from skinned goat heads and ostrich spines); his signature black leather corset, g-string and garter stockings; an elaborate Roman legionary-style imperial galea; an Allgemeine SS-style peaked police cap; a black-and-white fur coat, and a large conical skirt which lifted him 12 metres (39 ft) in the air.[69][141][142]
The Ozzfest leg marked the band's first performance in Denver, Colorado (on June 22, 2001 at Mile High Stadium) after the Columbine High School massacre in Littleton.[143] After initially canceling due to a scheduling conflict, the band changed their plans to play the Denver date.[143] The group's decision met resistance from conservative groups; Manson received death threats and demands to skip the date.[144][145] A group of church leaders and families related to Columbine formed an organization opposing the show, Citizens for Peace and Respect, which was supported by Colorado governor Bill Owens and representative Tom Tancredo. On their website, the ad hoc group claimed that the band "promotes hate, violence, death, suicide, drug use, and the attitudes and actions of the Columbine killers".[143][146] In response, Manson issued a statement:

I am truly amazed that after all this time, religious groups still need to attack entertainment and use these tragedies as a pitiful excuse for their own self-serving publicity. In response to their protests, I will provide a show where I balance my songs with a wholesome Bible reading. This way, fans will not only hear my so-called, 'violent' point of view, but we can also examine the virtues of wonderful 'Christian' stories of disease, murder, adultery, suicide and child sacrifice. Now that seems like 'entertainment' to me.[147]
Two films of the concert tour were made. The Guns, God and Government DVD, released by Eagle Rock Entertainment on October 29, 2002, featured live concert footage from performances in Los Angeles, Europe and Japan.[148][149] It also included a 30-minute behind-the-scenes featurette, The Death Parade, with guest appearances by Ozzy Osbourne and Eminem.[149] Seven years later, it was followed by Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. Released on Blu-ray by Eagle Rock Entertainment (a division of Eagle Records) on November 17, 2009, it depicts the entire sixteen-song set of the final show of the tour – the Los Angeles performance.[150][151]
Track listing
All lyrics written by Manson[32][112].

A: In the Shadow

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "GodEatGod"   Manson 2:34
2. "The Love Song"   Ramirez, 5 3:16
3. "The Fight Song"   5 2:55
4. "Disposable Teens"   5, Ramirez 3:01

D: The Androgyne

No.
Title
Music
Length

5. "Target Audience (Narcissus Narcosis)"   Ramirez, 5 4:18
6. ""President Dead""   Ramirez, 5, Gacy 3:13
7. "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death"   Ramirez, 5 4:09
8. "Cruci-Fiction in Space"   Ramirez, 5, Gacy 4:56
9. "A Place in the Dirt"   5 3:37

A: Of Red Earth

No.
Title
Music
Length

10. "The Nobodies"   5, Manson 3:35
11. "The Death Song"   5, Manson 3:29
12. "Lamb of God"   Ramirez 4:39
13. "Born Again"   Ramirez, 5 3:20
14. "Burning Flag"   Ramirez, 5 3:21

M: The Fallen

No.
Title
Music
Length

15. "Coma Black: a) Eden Eye b) The Apple of Discord"   Manson, 5, Ramirez 5:58
16. "Valentine's Day"   Ramirez, Manson 3:31
17. "The Fall of Adam"   Ramirez, 5 2:34
18. "King Kill 33º"   Ramirez 2:18
19. "Count to Six and Die (The Vacuum of Infinite Space Encompassing)"   5 3:24

Bonus tracks[104]

No.
Title
Music
Length

20. "The Nobodies" (Acoustic Version; Japan/UK editions only) Manson. 5 3:35
21. "Mechanical Animals" (Live; Japan edition only) Manson, Ramirez, Zum 4:41
Notes
The disc contains a data track leading to a video no longer hosted by Interscope's website,[32] but later included as a secret track on the companion DVD of Lest We Forget.[152]
Charts and certifications

Album charts

Charts (2000)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[128] 8
Austria (Ö3)[128] 6
Belgium (Flanders) (Ultratop 50)[128][153] 34
Belgium (Wallonia) (Ultratop)[128] 29
Canada (CANOE)[126][154] 13
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[128] 25
France (SNEP)[128] 12
Germany (Media Control)[155] 11
Ireland (IRMA)[156] 21
Italy (FIMI)[128] 7
Japan (Oricon)[157] 14
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[128] 53
New Zealand (RIANZ)[128] 18
Norway (VG-Lista)[128] 12
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[128] 7
Switzerland (Hitparade)[128] 20
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 23
United States Billboard 200[126][154] 13
Billboard Top Internet Albums[126][154] 10

Certifications

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual sales
Canada CRIA Gold[159] 50,000+ —
Switzerland IFPI Gold[160] 20,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[161] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Gold[127] 500,000+ —

Singles


Single
Chart (2000)
Peak
 position
"Disposable Teens" Australia (ARIA)[162] 24
France (SNEP)[162] 67
Italy (FIMI)[162] 7
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[162] 99
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[162] 52
Switzerland (Hitparade)[162] 73
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 12
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[163] 22
Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[163] 24

Single
Chart (2001)
Peak
 position
"The Fight Song" Austria (Ö3)[164] 59
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[164] 19
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 24

Single
Chart (2001)
Peak
 position
"The Nobodies" Austria (Ö3)[165] 56
France (SNEP)[165] 94
Italy (FIMI)[165] 17
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[165] 8
Switzerland (Hitparade)[165] 96
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 34

Credits and personnel


Marilyn Manson[166]Marilyn Manson – arranger, vocals, producer, art direction, concept, syncussion, optigan, mellotron, distorted flute, synth bass, keyboards, piano, electric harpsichord, rhythm guitar
Twiggy Ramirez – bass, guitar (rhythm, lead, Leslie, warped), keyboards
John 5 – guitar (lead, rhythm, acoustic, synth, electric, slide, phase)
Madonna Wayne Gacy – synths, ambiance, keyboards, samples, bass synth, synth strings, mellotron, sound effects
Ginger Fish – drums (live, drum machine), sound effects, keyboards

Production[166]Bon Harris of Nitzer Ebb – synthesizers, programming, pre-production editing, organic drum programming, bass, keyboard, synth bass, sleigh bells, electronics, piano
Paulie Northfield – additional engineering
D. Sardy (Dave Sardy) – producer, synths, (organic) drum programming, mixing, rhythm guitar
P.R. Brown – art direction, design, photography
Greg Fidelman – engineer
Nick Raskulinecz – assistant engineer
Joe Zook – assistant engineer
Kevin Guarnieri – assistant engineer
Danny Saber – additional loops
Alex Suttle – backing vocals

References
Notes
1.Jump up ^ Harris and Klebold appeared on the May 3, 1999, cover of Time, titled The Monsters Next Door, along with their victims. The killer's pictures are colored and superimposed over their victims' school photos, which are noticeably smaller, and in black and white.[59] They appeared again on Time‍ '​s December 20, 1999, cover, titled The Columbine Tapes. This time the picture depicts only the killers—with their weapons—in a screenshot taken from the school's surveillance camera of the cafeteria during the rampage.[60]
Footnotes
1.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Bryant, Tom (2010-11-10). "Screaming For Vengeance". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (1338): 40–42.
2.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j Lanham, Tom (November 2000). "Marilyn Manson: Absinthe Makes The Heart Grow Fonder". Alternative Press (Alternative Press Magazine, Inc.) (148): 76–86.
3.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Kessler, Ted (2000-09-09). "Marilyn Manson Goes Ape". NME (IPC Media): 28–31.
4.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Rolling Stone Album Guide for Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-07-21.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Strauss, Neil (1997-05-17). "A Bogey Band to Scare Parents With". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
6.^ Jump up to: a b c France, Lisa Respers (2009-04-20). "Columbine left its indelible mark on pop culture". CNN (Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (Time Warner)). Retrieved 2010-11-17.
7.^ Jump up to: a b Cullen, Dave (1999-09-23). "Inside the Columbine High investigation". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
8.Jump up ^ O'Connor, Christopher (1999-04-27). "Colorado Tragedy Continues To Spark Manson Bashing". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
9.Jump up ^ Jones 2002, pp. 126–127
10.Jump up ^ Meegan, Holland (2009-04-20). "Columbine High School massacre on 10th anniversary: 5 myths surrounding deadliest school attack in U.S. history". The Grand Rapids Press (Advance Magazine Publishers, Inc. D.B.A. Booth Newspapers, Inc). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
11.Jump up ^ Burk, Greg (2001-01-18). "Marilyn:A Re-Examination (page 1)". LA Weekly (Village Voice Media). Retrieved 2010-11-22.
12.Jump up ^ Uhelszki, Jaan (1999-08-13). "Lynyrd Skynyrd Threaten Marilyn Manson With a Can of Whoop Ass". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
13.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Postpones U.S. Tour Dates". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-04-28. Retrieved 2011-03-21.
14.^ Jump up to: a b "Outraged Senators Write To Manson's Label". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-04-29. Retrieved 2011-05-03.
15.^ Jump up to: a b O'Connor, Christopher (1999-05-01). "Politicians Go On Offensive Against Marilyn Manson". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-04.
16.Jump up ^ Sterngold, James (1999-04-29). "Terror in Littleton: The Culture; Rock Concerts Are Cancelled". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2010-11-22.
17.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
18.Jump up ^ O'Connor, Christopher (1999-06-01). "Manson Rants, Raves, Reacts In Rolling Stone Essay". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-04.
19.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: The Write To Be Wrong". NME. IPC Media. 1999-05-01. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
20.^ Jump up to: a b c d e O'Connor, Christopher (1999-05-04). "Senators Criticize Marilyn Manson, Nine Inch Nails At Hearing". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
21.^ Jump up to: a b Tapper, Jake (2000-08-29). "Hollywood on trial". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
22.^ Jump up to: a b c Long, April (2000-11-10). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) album review". NME. IPC Media. Retrieved 2010-12-02.
23.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Basham, David (2000-02-29). "Marilyn Manson Tweaks "Holy Wood" Plans". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-22.
24.Jump up ^ Michael, Ibrahim (August 2000). "Welcome To Hollywood". Hammer Edge.
25.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Rushfield, Richard (November 2000). "The Antichrist's Cross". CMJ New Music Monthly (College Media Inc.) (87): 46–51.
26.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Marilyn Manson Unveils Tour Plans, First Single For Holy Wood". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
27.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m McCaughey, Brian (2000-08-05). "This Is My Holy Wood". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (813): 4–7.
28.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Basham, David (1999-12-16). "Manson To Walk In The "Valley Of Death" For Next LP". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
29.^ Jump up to: a b c Norris, John (1999-11-24). "'Marilyn Manson To Probe Celebrity And Suffering In New Film, Next Album.". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
30.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson's Unholy Doings". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-08-03. Retrieved 2011-04-03.
31.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Christopher Scapelliti (Winter 2000). "Dark Angel". Revolver (Future US, Inc.): 72–77.
32.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Enhanced". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
33.^ Jump up to: a b c d Basham, David (2000-08-25). "Manson Expands On "Adam" Concept For New LP". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
34.^ Jump up to: a b c Hochman, Steve (2000-07-20). "The Third Face of Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media LLC) (845).
35.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h VanHorn, Teri (1999-12-16). "Marilyn Manson: Upcoming Album 'Unlike' Predecessors". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-05.
36.Jump up ^ "Manson To Reveal Album Title Online". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-12-09. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
37.^ Jump up to: a b c Simunek, Chris (February 2001). Skye, Dan; Bienenstock, David; Hager, Steven, eds. "Tinseltown Rebellion: Marilyn Manson In The City Of Angels". High Times (Tom Forcade) 306: 52–58. Retrieved 2011-04-30.
38.^ Jump up to: a b Young, Simon (2000-11-11). "He Hits the Keyboards. His Friends Call Him Pogo. He Jumps Through Windows for Fun". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
39.^ Jump up to: a b Young, Simon (2000-11-11). "You Know Him As a Drummer; He Calls Himself the Bodyguard". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
40.^ Jump up to: a b Winwood, Ian (2000-11-11). "Manson's Right Hand Man on Fame, Failure and Masturbating with Pizza Dough". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
41.Jump up ^ Arnum, Eric (2000-02-23). "Marilyn Manson Lectures At Alternative-Information Conference". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-03.
42.^ Jump up to: a b "Manson Launches New Posthuman Label". NME. IPC Media. 2000-04-12. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Alexander, Phil (2000-11-11). "The Holy War". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 44–45. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
44.^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Kara (1999-11-16). "Marilyn Manson Discusses Post-Columbine Shell Shock". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
45.Jump up ^ "Satanic Cult Meeting". NME. IPC Media. 1999-11-16. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
46.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Palahniuk, Chuck (November 2000). "Destiny's Child". Gear Magazine (Bob Guccione, Jr.): 73.
47.Jump up ^ "Alien Autopsy: Marilyn Manson and David Duchovny on Area 51". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (Future US). February 2005.
48.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Gargano, Paul (March 2001). "Holy Wars: The Ground Campaign Begins". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media): 6–12.
49.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Myers, Ben (2000-11-18). "Holy Wood". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (831): 29–36.
50.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Robinson, Charlotte (2000-12-14). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) album review". PopMatters. Sarah Zupko. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
51.Jump up ^ Segal, David (2000-11-27). "Welcome to His Nightmare: Acceptance". Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
52.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Revolution in Action". Rock Sound (Editions Freeway) (11). 2001-01-08.
53.^ Jump up to: a b c Manson, Marilyn (2000-12-01). Marilyn Manson: No Regrets. Interview with Kurt Loder. MTV Networks (Viacom). MTV. New York.
54.^ Jump up to: a b c d Burk, Greg (2001-01-18). "Marilyn:A Re-Examination (page 2)". LA Weekly (Village Voice Media). Retrieved 2010-08-22.
55.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "The 'Holy..' Bible!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-08-29. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
56.^ Jump up to: a b c Clark, Stuart (2001-02-01). "No More Mister Nasty Guy". Hot Press 25 (2). Retrieved 2011-04-30.
57.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (1999-12-30). "Last Poll Of The Century". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Millennium Special ed.) (Wenner Media LLC) (830).
58.Jump up ^ Paul Gargano (July 1999). "Revelations of an Alien-Messiah". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media) 44: 08–13.
59.Jump up ^ "The Monsters Next Door (May 3, 1999 cover of Time magazine)". Time. Time Inc. (Time Warner). 1999-05-03. Retrieved 2011-05-24.
60.Jump up ^ "The Columbine Tapes (December 20, 1999 cover of Time magazine)". Time. Time Inc. (Time Warner). 1999-12-20. Retrieved 2011-05-24.
61.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2001-08-20). Children at Risk: Marilyn Manson Interview. Interview with Bill O'Reilly. The O'Reilly Factor. Fox News Channel (News Corporation). New York. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
62.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson's Big Day Out". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-08-30. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
63.^ Jump up to: a b Manson, Marilyn (2000-11-15). Mothers Against Marilyn Manson. Interview with Carson Daly. MTV Networks (Viacom). Total Request Live (TRL). MTV. New York.
64.^ Jump up to: a b Mancini, Robert (2000-11-15). "Marilyn Manson Marks Holy Wood Release With Acoustic Set". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
65.Jump up ^ "Manson Works On New LP, Screenplay". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-06-09. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
66.^ Jump up to: a b Moss, Corey (2000-02-17). "Marilyn Manson Covers Charles Manson Song". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-05.
67.Jump up ^ "Manson Brings You '...Love'". NME. IPC Media. 2000-08-10. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
68.Jump up ^ "'Teens' Sensation". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-10. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
69.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Give 'Em Enough Pope". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-30. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
70.Jump up ^ "Maz Gets 'Netted". NME. IPC Media. 2000-11-02. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
71.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Teenage Sensation!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-24. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
72.^ Jump up to: a b c d e Chirazi, Steffan (June 2001). "Marilyn Manson: Moral Minority". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media).
73.Jump up ^ "Entertainment industry an issue, asset for presidential campaign". CNN (Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (Time Warner)). 2000-11-06. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
74.Jump up ^ "Lieberman steps up Hollywood attack". BBC News (BBC). 2001-07-06. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
75.Jump up ^ Eszterhas, Joe (2000-09-14). "They came, they caved". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
76.Jump up ^ "Hollywood denies 'selling violence'". BBC News (BBC). 2000-09-12. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
77.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-08-02). "Manson Reveals Date, Tracks For "Holy Wood"". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
78.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Manson Moves "Holy Wood" Date, Preps Tour Plans". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
79.Jump up ^ "Punk's Not Dead!". NME. 2000-11-13. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
80.^ Jump up to: a b "'...Wood' You Believe It?". NME. IPC Media. 2000-11-10. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
81.Jump up ^ vanHorn, Teri (2001-01-10). "Marilyn Manson Denies Video Has Columbine Link". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-02.
82.^ Jump up to: a b Moss, Corey (2001-01-03). "Goths Battle Jocks In Upcoming Marilyn Manson Video". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-02.
83.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Announces First Leg Of World Tour". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-09-22. Retrieved 2011-04-03.
84.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens pt. 1". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
85.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens 1 [Single, Import]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
86.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens Pt. 1 [Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
87.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [Single, Import]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
88.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [12" Vinyl]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
89.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
90.^ Jump up to: a b "See Stills From New Manson Video". NME. IPC Media. 2001-02-13. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
91.^ Jump up to: a b c "Manson Comes Out Fighting". NME. IPC Media. 2001-01-11. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
92.Jump up ^ "Fight Song [12" Vinyl] [Single, Limited Edition]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
93.Jump up ^ "Manson Gets 'Knotted". NME. IPC Media. 2001-01-09. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
94.Jump up ^ "Fight Song [CD 2] [Single, Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
95.Jump up ^ "The Fight Song Pt.2 [Import, Single]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
96.^ Jump up to: a b Myers, Ben (2001-02-10). "The Devil Rides Out". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (839): 12–17.
97.Jump up ^ "It's Goth To Talk". NME. IPC Media. 2001-04-30. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
98.Jump up ^ "'Nobodies' Here!". NME. IPC Media. 2001-08-21. Retrieved 2011-06-11.
99.Jump up ^ "Nobodies [Import, Single]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
100.Jump up ^ Wiederhorn, Jon (2001-11-01). "Marilyn Manson Cover 'Tainted Love,' Record Live DVD". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
101.Jump up ^ "Christ Almighty!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-09-26. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
102.^ Jump up to: a b Schumacher-Rasmussen, Eric (2000-11-14). "Newsbrief: Two Chains Balk At Marilyn Manson Album Cover". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-03.
103.Jump up ^ "The 50 Most Controversial Album Covers Of All Time!". Gigwise. Giant Digital. Retrieved 2011-03-16.
104.^ Jump up to: a b "Holy Wood (Extra Tracks, Import)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
105.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (Original Recording Remastered, Import)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
106.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood Amazon Search". Amazon. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
107.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Limited Reissue". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
108.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Vinyl". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
109.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Audio Cassette". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
110.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) MP3 Download". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
111.Jump up ^ http://www.metacritic.com/music/holy-wood-in-the-shadow-of-the-valley-of-death
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116.Jump up ^ Melody Maker (11/14/00, p.50) - 4 stars out of 5 - "...Compelling....A pouting, teeth-baring, stranger-snogging tart of an album, a glorious, blistering cacophony, an explosive death-glam rampage. Marilyn is to T.Rex what jungle is to techno..."
117.^ Jump up to: a b Walter, Barry (2000-11-23). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) review". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
118.Jump up ^ NME (Magazine) (11/11/00, p.32) - 8 out of 10 - "...Melds the glam-frocked space-rock of MECHANICAL ANIMALS with the industrial crunch of ANTICHRIST, he has hit upon something thrilling....brilliantly executed..."
119.^ Jump up to: a b Price, Dale (2000-11-13). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)". Drowned in Sound. Silentway Ltd. Retrieved 2011-03-11.
120.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson: Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000): Summary". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2010-11-15.
121.^ Jump up to: a b "Critic Reviews for Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) – Marilyn Manson". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
122.Jump up ^ Hilburn, Robert (2000-11-12). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) LA Times Record Rack review". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved 2011-04-08.
123.Jump up ^ Klein, Joshua (2000-11-14). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) AV Club music review". The A.V. Club. The Onion, Inc. Retrieved 2011-03-09.
124.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson May Be In for a Shock". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). 2000-11-20. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
125.Jump up ^ Dansby, Andrew (2003-05-21). "Manson Golden at Number One". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
126.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "Billboard 200 and Canadian Albums charting". Billboard 200. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
127.^ Jump up to: a b "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
128.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (Album)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
129.Jump up ^ "The Official UK Charts Database Search for Marilyn Manson". The Official Charts Company (OCC). Retrieved 2011-03-24.
130.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Eagle Rock Entertainment. Retrieved 2011-01-04.
131.^ Jump up to: a b c Winwood, Ian (2002-03-23). "Paranoia, Jail Sentences, September 11 and Kittens?". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (896).
132.Jump up ^ "Manson wins Kerrang! honour". BBC News. BBC. 2001-08-28. Retrieved 2010-11-19.
133.Jump up ^ "'Holy' Shitstorm!". NME. IPC Media. 2001-08-29. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
134.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! Albums Of The Year 2000". Kerrang!. Bauer Media Group. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
135.Jump up ^ "50 best albums of 2000". NME. IPC Media. 2009-06-11. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
136.Jump up ^ "Kritiker Top 50 die fünfzig besten Alben 2000". Musik-Express/Sounds (in German). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
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138.Jump up ^ "Rock Sound Choix des critiques depuis 1993". Rock Sound (in French). Editions Freeway. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
139.Jump up ^ "10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century". Record Collector (Diamond Publishing) (257). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
140.Jump up ^ "A Day in the Life of Marilyn Manson". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group). 2000-02-10.
141.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Muses On Politics As He Prepares For Tour". Star Tribune (The Star Tribune Company). 2000-10-26.
142.Jump up ^ Mancini, Robert (2001-06-12). "Metal Scrapes Against Metal At Ozzfest Opener". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-02.
143.^ Jump up to: a b c "Denver of Iniquity?". NME. IPC Media. 2001-05-08. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
144.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: 'I'm Always Going To Be Bad'". Blabbermouth.Net. Borivoj Krgin. 2007-06-02. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
145.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: 'My Greatest Fear Has Always Been Not Being Able To Create'". Blabbermouth.Net. Borivoj Krgin. 2007-04-15. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
146.Jump up ^ D'Angelo, Joe (2001-05-21). "Colorado Governor, Congressman Support Anti-Manson Group". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
147.Jump up ^ "Manson To Lead Bible Studies Class". NME. IPC Media. 2001-05-13. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
148.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – Guns, God and Government World Tour (2001)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-03-28.
149.^ Jump up to: a b LeVasseur, Andrea. "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government World Tour". MTV. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-28.
150.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. [Blu-ray] (2009)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-03-28.
151.Jump up ^ Seibert, Perry. "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A.". MTV. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-28.
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153.Jump up ^ "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (Album)". Ultratop. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
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156.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood ChartTrack". GfK. Retrieved 2011-01-18.
157.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson album sales ranking". Oricon. Retrieved June 22, 2012.
158.^ Jump up to: a b c d Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M – My Vitriol". Zobbel. Retrieved 2010-12-14.
159.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
160.Jump up ^ "Search for: Marilyn Manson" (in Swiss). The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
161.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
162.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Disposable Teens (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
163.^ Jump up to: a b "Modern Rock Tracks charting". Billboard 200. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2010-09-18.
164.^ Jump up to: a b "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Fight Song (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
165.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Nobodies (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
166.^ Jump up to: a b "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) credits". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2010-11-17.
Bibliography
Jones, Steve (August 2002). Pop Music and the Press. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. ISBN 1-56639-966-1.
Manson, Marilyn (2003-05-15). "The Dead Rock Star". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Wenner Media LLC) (922).
External links
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) at Interscope Records


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Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

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Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
November 13, 2000
Recorded
1999–2000
Death Valley, California
The Mansion (Laurel Canyon, California)
Genre
Industrial metal, alternative metal
Length
68:07
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Marilyn Manson, Dave Sardy
Marilyn Manson chronology

The Last Tour on Earth
 (1999) Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
 (2000) The Golden Age of Grotesque
 (2003)


Singles from Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)
1."Disposable Teens"
 Released: November 7, 2000
2."The Fight Song"
 Released: February 2, 2001
3."The Nobodies"
 Released: October 6, 2001

Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) is the fourth studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson, released in November 2000 by Nothing and Interscope Records. The album marked a return to the industrial and alternative metal styles of the band's earlier efforts, after the modernized glam rock of Mechanical Animals. As their first release following the Columbine High School massacre of April 20, 1999, Holy Wood was Marilyn Manson's rebuttal to accusations leveled against them in the wake of the shootings. The band's frontman, Marilyn Manson, described the record as "a declaration of war".[1]
A rock opera concept album, it is the final installment in a trilogy which includes Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals. After its release, Manson said that the overarching story within the trilogy is presented in reverse chronological order; Holy Wood, therefore, begins the narrative.[2] It was written in the singer's former home in the Hollywood Hills and recorded in several undisclosed locations, including Death Valley and Laurel Canyon.
At its release, Holy Wood received mixed-to-positive reviews; many critics noted that while ambitious, it fell short in execution. The album was not at first as commercially successful as the group's two previous releases, and took three years to receive a gold certification from the RIAA. Nevertheless, with worldwide sales of over nine million copies as of 2011, it has become one of the most successful of their career. It spawned three singles and an abandoned film project which was modified into the as-yet-unreleased Holy Wood novel. Marilyn Manson supported the album with the controversial Guns, God and Government Tour.
On November 10, 2010, British rock magazine Kerrang! published a 10th-anniversary commemorative piece in which they called the album "Manson's finest hour ... A decade on, there has still not been as eloquent and savage a musical attack on the media and mainstream culture ... [It is] still scathingly relevant [and] a credit to a man who refused to sit and take it, but instead come out swinging."[1]


Contents  [hide]
1 Background and development
2 Recording and production 2.1 Novel and film
3 Concept 3.1 Themes
4 Composition
5 Promotion
6 Release 6.1 Singles
6.2 Cover and packaging
6.3 Formats
7 Reception 7.1 From critics
7.2 Sales
7.3 Accolades
7.4 Legacy
8 Guns, God and Government Tour
9 Track listing
10 Charts and certifications 10.1 Album charts
10.2 Certifications
10.3 Singles
11 Credits and personnel
12 References
13 External links

Background and development
Further information: Columbine High School massacre and Rock Is Dead Tour



Ninety-nine was a pivotal year — as was 1969, the year of my birth. The two years share many similarities. Woodstock '99 [where rape and mass looting were rife], became an Altamont [the Rolling Stones concert in 1969 where the Hells Angels beat a fan to death] of its own. Columbine became the Manson murders of our generation. Things happened that could've made me want to stop making music. Instead, I decided to come out and really punish everyone for daring to fuck with me. I've got a big fight ahead of me on this one. And I want every bit of it.
—Marilyn Manson[3]
During the 1990s Marilyn Manson and his eponymous band established themselves as one of the most controversial rock acts in music history.[4] The band became a household name with the mainstream success of their albums, Antichrist Superstar (1996) and Mechanical Animals (1998).[4] By the time of their Rock Is Dead Tour in 1999, the band's outspoken frontman had become a culture war iconoclast and a rallying icon for alienated youth.[4]
As their popularity increased the transgressive, confrontational nature of the group's music and imagery angered social conservatives.[5] Politicians across the political spectrum lobbied to have their performances banned, citing rumors that the shows contained animal sacrifices, bestiality and rape.[4] Their concerts were picketed by religious advocates and parent groups, who contended that their music had a corrupting influence on youth culture by inciting "rape, murder, blasphemy and suicide".[5]
On April 20, 1999, Columbine High School students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold shot 12 students and a teacher to death, wounding 21 others before committing suicide.[6] In the aftermath of the fourth-deadliest school shooting in United States history, the band became a scapegoat.[1][6] Early media reports alleged that the shooters were fans of the band and wore the group's t-shirts during the massacre.[7][8] Speculation in national media and among the public blamed Manson's music and imagery for inciting Harris and Klebold.[1][9] Later reports revealed that the two considered the band "a joke".[7][10] Despite this, the group (and other bands and popular entertainment, such as movies and video games) were widely criticized by religious, political and entertainment-industry figures.[3][11][12]
Under mounting pressure in the days after Columbine, the group postponed their last five North American tour dates out of respect for the victims and their families.[13] On April 29 ten US senators (led by Sam Brownback of Kansas) sent a letter to Edgar Bronfman Jr., president of Seagrams (which owned Interscope Records), requesting a voluntary halt to his company's distribution to children of "music that glorifies violence".[14][15] The letter named Marilyn Manson (and other bands) for producing songs which "eerily reflect" the actions of Harris and Klebold.[14][15] Later that day, the band canceled their remaining North American shows.[16] On May 1 Manson published a Rolling Stone op-ed response to the accusations, "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?"[17][18] In it, he wrote:

I chose not to jump into the media frenzy and defend myself, though I was begged to be on every single TV show in existence. I didn't want to contribute to these fame-seeking journalists and opportunists looking to fill their churches or to get elected [during the US general election of 2000] because of their self-righteous finger-pointing. They want to blame entertainment? Isn't religion the first real entertainment? People dress up in costumes, sing songs and dedicate themselves to eternal fandom ... I'd like [the] media commentators to ask themselves, because their coverage of [Columbine] was some of the most gruesome entertainment any of us have seen.[19]
On May 4, a hearing on the marketing and distribution of violent content to minors by the television, music, film and video-game industries was held by the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.[20] The committee heard testimony from "cultural observers" (such as William Bennett and the Archbishop of Denver, Charles J. Chaput), professors and mental-health professionals.[20] Speakers criticized the band, its label-mate Nine Inch Nails and the 1999 film The Matrix for their alleged contribution to a cultural environment enabling violence such as the Columbine shootings.[20] The committee requested that the Federal Trade Commission and the United States Department of Justice investigate the entertainment industry's marketing practices to minors.[20][21]
Concluding the European and Japanese legs of their tour on August 8, 1999, the band withdrew from public view.[1][2] The album's early development coincided with Manson's three-month seclusion at his home in the Hollywood Hills,[2] during which he considered how to respond to the accusations.[1] Manson said the maelstrom made him reevaluate his career: "[t]here was a bit of trepidation, [in] deciding, 'Is it worth it? Are people understanding what I'm trying to say? Am I even gonna be allowed to say it?' Because I definitely had every single door shut in my face ... there were not a lot of people who stood behind me."[2][3] He told Alternative Press he felt his safety was threatened to the point that he "could be shot Mark David Chapman-style".[2] Manson concluded that it was unwise for a controversial artist to allow his detractors to scapegoat his work (and popular entertainment in general), beginning work on the album as a counterattack.[1][22]
Recording and production
Manson began writing for the album in 1995, before the release of Antichrist Superstar;[23] the material initially consisted of scattered ideas.[24] Isolating himself in his attic, he worked the early material into a usable shape.[25][26] At the end of Manson's three-month retreat, the band embarked on a year of writing and developing the material.[1][22][27] Band members maintained a low profile, and Manson said the band's website would "be my only contact with humanity".[28]



I'm at that point in my career where I wanted to make this film and I'm making this new record, where I really examine suffering and where celebrities come from. How it all kind of traces back in religion, and celebrities and Hollywood all kind of relate to each other. And that's very American.
—Marilyn Manson[29]
The album is the group's most collaborative effort to date, with all members contributing to the songwriting process (resulting in a more-unified sound).[27][30] Most of the work was shouldered by Twiggy Ramirez, John 5 and Marilyn Manson; keyboardist Madonna Wayne Gacy provided input on "President Dead" and "Cruci-Fiction in Space", and Ginger Fish did the drum work.[1][31] Manson said that his songwriting sessions with John 5 were very focused;[31] most of the songs were complete before being brought to the band for consideration, and were enthusiastically received.[31] In contrast, his sessions with Ramirez were less demanding as they experimented with absinthe.[31] The band wrote 100 musical fragments; between 25 and 30 became songs,[31] and 19 were selected for the album.[32]

White symbol inside a white circle on a black background

 Stylized version of the alchemical symbol for mercury, used by the band as a logo for the album and the character of Adam Kadmon[33]
The album was recorded at several locations, including Death Valley and Rick Rubin's Mansion Studio in Laurel Canyon.[34] Locations were chosen for the atmosphere they were intended to impart to the music.[27] Mixing engineer Dave Sardy co-produced the album with Manson; Bon Harris, of electronic body music group Nitzer Ebb, did the programming and pre-production editing.[28] Manson announced on December 16, 1999 that the album was progressing under a working title of "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death", with its logo the alchemical symbol for mercury.[28][35][36]
The band visited Death Valley a number of times to "imprint the feeling of the desert into [their] minds" and avoid composing artificial-sounding songs.[37] Experimental recordings and acoustic songs were recorded with live instrumentation. Manson later explained that the acoustic songs were "acoustic" in that they were not produced electrically; the album's sonic landscape is intrinsically electronic. Harris' programming skills proved invaluable as the band recorded unique, natural sounds, which he molded into aural elements.[27]
The band spent considerable time at the Mansion Studio, with its cavernous rooms suitable for recording drums.[27] Inspired by the space,[38][39] the band found they could accomplish more there than in the limited environment of Manson's home studio.[27][28] Ramirez later had a fuzzy memory of the sessions,[40] explaining that there were "a lot of different emotions racing around [us]"; the house, which once belonged to Harry Houdini, is said to be haunted.[40] Gacy said that he spent most of his time working on a computer and synthesizer, "mess[ing] around with prime-number loops where they only intersect every three days and I'd check up on what kind of music they'd be making. You never know what's going to happen".[38] Fish worked constantly, and the bulk of his contributions to the recording process were made at the Mansion.[39]
On February 23, 2000 Manson delivered a 20-minute lecture via satellite to a current-events convention, "DisinfoCon 2000", aimed at exposing (and dispelling) disinformation.[41] Six days later, their album was entitled Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death).[23] By April 12 the band was in their final stages of recording, and Manson posted footage of the recording studio.[42] In pre-release interviews, he noted that the record would be "a very sharp pencil" which would appeal to Marilyn Manson fans.[43]
Novel and film
Further information: Holy Wood (novel)
Manson's ambitions for the project initially included an eponymous film exploring the album's backstory.[1][29] In July 1999, he had reportedly begun negotiating with New Line Cinema to produce and distribute the film and its soundtrack.[23] At the 1999 MTV Europe Music Awards in Dublin (where the band performed on November 11),[44] he disclosed the film's title and his production plans.[29] Manson met Chilean avant-garde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky at the event to discuss work on the film, although no final decision was made.[44][45] By February 29, 2000 the deal fell through when Manson had reservations that New Line Cinema would take the film in a direction which would not have "retained his artistic vision".[23]
Abandoning his attempt to bring Holy Wood to the screen, Manson announced plans to publish two books accompanying the album.[23] The first was a "graphic and phantasmagoric" novelization, intended for release shortly after the album by ReganBooks (a division of HarperCollins).[25] The novel's style was inspired by William S. Burroughs, Kurt Vonnegut, Aldous Huxley and Philip K. Dick,[27] and it would be followed by a coffee table book of images created for the project.[23]
In a December 2000 interview with Manson, novelist Chuck Palahniuk mentioned the Holy Wood novel (due for release in spring 2001) and complimented its style.[46] Neither book has yet been released, reportedly due to a publishing dispute.[47]
Concept



"Holy Wood"—which isn't even that great of a hyperbole of America—is a place where an obituary is just another headline. Where if you die and enough people are watching, then you're famous.
—Marilyn Manson, on the album's concept[2]
The album's plot is a "parable"[25] in a thinly-veiled satire of modern America called "Holy Wood", which Manson has described as a city-sized, Disneyesque amusement park where the main attractions are violence and sex.[2][48] Its literary foil is "Death Valley", "a metaphor for the outcast and the imperfect of the world."[49]
The central character is the ill-fated protagonist "Adam Kadmon",[1][23][50] a name borrowed from the Kabbalah which means "primal man". In the similarly-mystical Sufi and Alevi philosophies, he is an archetypical "perfect" or "complete man".[23] Adam Kadmon travels from Death Valley to Holy Wood;[49] idealistic and naïve, he attempts a revolution through music.[49]
Disenchanted when his revolution is consumed by Holy Wood's ideology of "guns, God and government", he is absorbed by its culture of death and fame in which celebrity worship, violence and scapegoating are the moral values of a religion rooted in martyrdom.[1][2][25] In this religion dead celebrities are revered as saints, and John F. Kennedy is idolized as a modern Christ.[3][25][49]
Known as "celebritarianism",[50] Holy Wood's religion parallels Christianity. It critiques the dead-celebrity phenomenon in American culture, with the crucifixion of Jesus as its blueprint.[2][3][25] This concept extended to the world Guns, God and Government Tour supporting the album; the tour's logo was a rifle, with handguns arranged to resemble the Christian cross.[51]
Manson told Rolling Stone that the plot is semi-autobiographical. While it can be viewed on several levels, he said that the simplest interpretation is to see it as a story of an angry youth whose revolution is commercialized, leading him to "destroy the thing he has created, which is himself."[30][34]
Themes
Violence is the central theme of the album,[52] which takes a critical look at America's obsession with firearms, death and fame and their ramifications in the Columbine tragedy.[1] Manson sees the root causes of Columbine as the gun culture, conservative American Christianity and traditional family values. The album illustrates the harmful roles they play in the glorification (and acceptance) of violence in "mainstream" culture,[22][53] illustrated by the slogan "Guns, God and Government".[1][49][54] Drawing similarities between the Cold War period of 1960s America and the 1990s, Manson uses allegories from the former decade and other events and figures in cultural history.[25][46][48][55] Music journalist Charlotte Robinson said that it is difficult to assess the "narrative's effectiveness" without the book and film: "the album doesn't tell much of a story, instead presenting variations on the same themes".[50]



[Holy Wood is] not necessarily [all] about the Columbine incident, but more the reason why it happened ... [It's about] the way America raises its kids to feel like they're unwanted and made to feel like they're dead already. They really don't have anything to live for and it's also concerned with the repercussions of that incident.
—Marilyn Manson, on the album's prevailing theme[49]
Manson was drawn to The Beatles' White Album because of its role in the Charles Manson "Family" murders and the parallels he saw between that crime and Columbine:[3][26][55] "[It] had a lot of very subversive messages on it. Ones they intended and ones that may've [sic] been misinterpreted by [convicted mass murder conspirator] Charles Manson". Manson believes it was the first piece of music blamed for inciting violence: "When you've got 'Helter Skelter' [taken from a Beatles song of the same name] written in blood on someone's wall, it's a little more damning than anything I've been blamed for".[3][26][55] Manson appreciates the record's power, which inspired his album's concept. Holy Wood, he said, "is a tribute to what that record did in history."[3][49][55]
Critics also noted similarities between anti-hero Adam Kadmon and Charles Manson.[3][37][49] Manson echoed this assessment, describing Holy Wood as a declaration of war on the entertainment industry: "their self-congratulatory attitude, their beliefs that they can never do wrong, ... that they're the center of the universe[1] ... [i]n one way it's defending Hollywood, and in another way it's attacking it for not being brave enough".[3][37]
A substantial portion of the album analyzes the cultural role of Jesus Christ and the iconography of his crucifixion as the origin of celebrity,[25][56] appraising "our relationship with Christ, and how we outgrew that".[3] Manson says that while in the past he critiqued religion, with this album he accepts the story and looks for things to which he can relate.[25][27] He discovered that Christ was a revolutionary figure—a person who was killed for having dangerous opinions, and was later exploited and merchandised by Christianity.[25][27] Manson notes the irony of "religious people who indict entertainment as being violent"; the crucifixion is an icon of violence which made Jesus "the first rock star". He feels that the exploitation of Christ as "the first celebrity" made religion the root of all entertainment.[25][56]
Christ's death is compared to Abraham Zapruder's film of the assassination of John F. Kennedy,[26] which Manson called "the only thing that's happened in modern times to equal the crucifixion".[2] He sarcastically described the historic home movie as a "good clip of mankind's generosity to share his violence with the world in such a cinematic way".[57] Manson stresses the film's cultural importance, noting the irony of showing such violence on the news while complaining about violence in the entertainment industry.[25] He watched the clip many times as a child, saying it was the most violent thing he had ever seen[25] and juxtaposing Christ and Kennedy:

Christ was the blueprint for celebrity. He was the first celebrity, or rock star if you want to look at it that way, and [dying on the cross] he became this image of sexuality and suffering. He’s literally marketed—A crucifix is no different than a concert T-shirt in some ways. I think for America, in my lifetime, John F. Kennedy kind of took the place of that [as a modern-day Christ] in some ways. [After being murdered on TV], he became lifted up as this icon and this Christ figure [by America].[58]
Manson also cites John Lennon as an assassinated icon, criticizing the media's veneration of media martyrs and its conversion of death into spectacle to cater to the American public's appetite for violence, tragedy and celebrity. He denies claims that Marilyn Manson's music was responsible for Columbine,[1][3] speculating how the media would have covered the Crucifixion[3] and linking these observations to Columbine during an interview on the O'Reilly Factor. Bill O'Reilly argued that "disturbed kids" without direction from responsible parents could misinterpret the message of his music as endorsing the belief that "when I'm dead [then] everybody's going to know me". Manson responded:

Well, I think that's a very valid point and I think that it's a reflection of, not necessarily this programme but of television in general, that if you die and enough people are watching you become a martyr, you become a hero, you become well known. So when you have these things like Columbine, and you have these kids who are angry and they have something to say and no one's listening, the media sends a message that says if you do something loud enough and it gets our attention then you will be famous for it. Those kids ended up on the cover of Time magazine [twice[N 1]], the media gave them exactly what they wanted. That's why I never did any interviews around that time when I was being blamed for it because I didn't want to contribute to something that I found to be reprehensible.[61]
Despite references to (and fascination with) the iconic men, Manson was reluctant to draw comparisons between them and himself (saying it would have been pretentious):[52] "[w]hat I did find was parallels in their stories and my story, and I tried to maybe learn from their mistakes and what they tried to do ... You realise you can't change the world and you can only change yourself, and I think that's what [they] found out".[52] He added, "[f]or me it was about learning from that and trying to break the evolution of man [since] it's man's nature to be violent".[52]
Composition



Is adult entertainment killing our children? Or is killing our children entertaining adults?
—Statement on the band's website during the Holy Wood era.[35]
In pre-release interviews, Manson said that Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was intended to be the "industrial White Album ... in the sense that it's very experimental. I play a lot of keyboards, we switched things around, wrote in the desert ... it's experimental and when I think of experimental I think of The White Album".[3] The 1969 Rolling Stones album Let It Bleed (another source of inspiration) was written in the same house where Manson wrote Holy Wood.[26]
Sonically, Manson said the record was "arrogant in an art rock sense" and the "heaviest" record the band has done. "It needs to be to complete the trilogy", he said.[3][27][30] Most of the songs have three or four parts (similar to art rock), because of the way the story is told.[27] The band took great care to avoid being "self-indulgent".[27] Manson considers the record entertaining: "Art rock is only self indulgent if it bores you".[27] CMJ New Music Monthly called the songs "angry and complex".[25] Rolling Stone noted that "on such songs as 'Target Audience', 'Disposable Teens' and 'Cruci-Fiction in Space', [the band] dismantles the slick, glam-tinged sound of [Mechanical] Animals in favor of the more brutal industrial-goth grind of his first [two] albums".[34]
Like Antichrist Superstar Holy Wood uses a song cycle structure, dividing the album into four movements—A: In the Shadow, D: The Androgyne, A: Of Red Earth and M: The Fallen—to frame Kadmon's story.[55] The storyline unfolds in a multi-tiered series of metaphors and allusions;[25] for example, the album's title refers not only to the "Hollywood sign" but also to "the tree of knowledge that Adam took the first fruit from when he fell out of paradise, the wood that Christ was crucified on, the wood that [Lee Harvey] Oswald's rifle is made from and the wood that so many coffins are made of".[25]
"GodEatGod" follows Adam as he meditates in the desert.[49] "The Love Song" is an anthem to Holy Wood's religion, Celebritarianism.[49] Manson said the idea for the song came from his observation that "Love Song" is one of the most common titles in music, and he wove in a metaphor about guns: "I was suggesting with the lyrics that the father is the hand, the mother is the gun, and the children are the bullets. Where you shoot them is your responsibility as parents".[53] The chorus is a rhetorical take on an American bumper sticker, which asks "Do you love your God, gun, government?"[49]




"The Love Song"







"The Love Song" applies dark humor to satirize America's concept of traditional family values by drawing parallels to its love affair with guns and violence.[53]

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The UK music magazine Kerrang! described "The Fight Song" as a "playground punk anthem".[43] Manson noted that the song's theme is Adam's desire to be a part of Holy Wood, and the track is autobiographical.[49] Speaking broadly, it is about "a person who's grown up all his life thinking that the grass is greener on the other side, but when he finally [gets there], he realises that it's worse than where he came from and that it's truly exploitative".[49] The line "The death of one is a tragedy, the death of millions is just a statistic" relates to overlooking the deaths of ordinary people, ignored by the media, compared to the media frenzy when someone dies dramatically.[48]
"Disposable Teens" is a "signature Marilyn Manson song",[49] with a bouncing guitar riff and Teutonic, staccato rhythm rooted in glam rocker Gary Glitter's song "Rock and Roll, Pt.2".[62] Its lyrical themes tackle the disenfranchisement of contemporary youth, "particularly those that have been [brought up] to feel like accidents", with the revolutionary idealism of their parents' generation.[48][49] The Beatles' influence is evident in this song,[26][35][48] whose chorus echoes the disillusionment of their White Album song "Revolution 1".[35][48] Here, the sentiment is a rallying cry for "disposable teens" against "this so-called generation of revolutionaries" indicted in the song: "You said you wanted evolution, the ape was a great big hit. You say want a revolution, man, and I say that you're full of shit".[35][48] Manson singles out "Target Audience (Narcissus Narcosis)" as his favorite song on the album; to him, it describes every person's desire for self-actualization.[49][63]
Borrowing a riff from English alternative rock band Radiohead,[43] "President Dead" is a guitar-driven song showcasing John 5's technical skill.[43] It opens with a sample of Don Gardiner's ABC News Radio broadcast announcing the death of John F. Kennedy.[48] The song is 3:13 long — a deliberate numerological reference to frame 313 of the Zapruder film, the frame with Kennedy's fatal head shot and the point at which JFK became an American media martyr "because the production value of his murder was so grand; the cinematography was so well done".[48] "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death" is an introspective song with Adam at his most emotionally vulnerable, nearly despairing.[48] "Cruci-Fiction in Space" further explores the Kennedy assassination, concluding that human beings have evolved from monkeys to men to guns.[25] "A Place in the Dirt" is another personal song, characterized by Adam's self-analysis of his place in Holy Wood.[43]




"Lamb of God"







Using the assassinations of Jesus Christ, JFK, and John Lennon as examples, in "Lamb of God" Manson criticizes his accusers by illustrating their hunger for venerating dead people into martyrs and superstars and for turning tragedy into televised spectacle.[1][50]

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"The Nobodies" is a mournful, elegiac dirge with a harpsichord and synthesized-drum introduction.[25][43] The verse "today I'm dirty and I want to be pretty, tomorrow I know I'm just dirt" has an Iggy Pop-style vocal delivery building to the adrenaline-fuelled chorus: "we are the nobodies, we wanna be somebodies, when we're dead they'll know just who we are. Some children died the other day, we fed machines and then we prayed, puked up and down in morbid faith, you should have seen the ratings that day".[6][25][43] CMJ noted that the song would be interpreted by some as a tribute to the Columbine shooters, but its point was not to glorify violence; rather, it was to depict a society drenched in its children's blood.[25] "The Death Song" is the turning point for Adam; he no longer cares.[48] Manson described it as sarcastic and nihilistic: "it's like 'We have no future and we don't give a fuck'".[48] Kerrang! described it as one of the album's "heaviest" songs.[43]
In "Lamb of God" Manson uses the examples of the assassinations of Jesus Christ, JFK and John Lennon to criticize his accusers, illuminating their hunger for venerating dead people as martyrs and superstars and for turning tragedy into televised spectacle.[1][50] The bridge paraphrases the chorus of "Across the Universe".[26] Manson notes that although John Lennon sang "nothing's going to change my world", "[Lennon's killer] Mark David Chapman came along and proved him very wrong. That was always something, growing up, that was very sad and tragic to me—a song that I always identified with".[26] "Burning Flag" is a heavy-metal song reminiscent of American industrial-metal band Ministry.[43] Lennon's "Working Class Hero" was covered between the band's August 30, 2000 appearance at the Kerrang! Awards and the November 14 launch of the album.[26][62][64] Describing Lennon's idealism and influence, Manson said "some of Lennon's Communist sentiments in his music later in his life were very dangerous. I think he died because of it. I don't think his death was any sort of accident. Aside from that, I think he's one of my favorite songwriters of all time".[62]
Promotion
Promotion began on June 9, 1999, with a web update that Manson was composing for a new album in tandem with a screenplay.[28][65] On December 16 he posted a four-minute video clip and written statement, elaborating on the upcoming album's themes and featuring excerpts of the band performing two new songs.[35] The first cut was a rock song which later became "Disposable Teens", and the second was a rough demo cover of the ballad "Little Child" known as "Mommy Dear".[35] Manson described the album as "the most violent yet beautiful creation we have accomplished. This is a soundtrack for a world that is being sold to kids and then being destroyed by them. But maybe that's exactly what it deserves".[28][35] An acoustic version of "Sick City", from Charles Manson's 1970 album Lie: The Love and Terror Cult, later appeared on February 14, 2000;[66] however, this song was not intended to be included in the upcoming album or the Holy Wood feature film.[66]
On April 12, 2000 Manson wrote that they were completing the final stages of recording and posted a downloadable, silent movie documenting the process.[42] This was followed on August 9 with a posting of the Holy Wood novel cover and a sound clip of "The Love Song" the following day.[67] On August 25 he released three tracks ("Burning Flag", "Cruci-Fiction in Space" and "The Love Song") for digital download on their website.[33] Manson traveled to the UK to perform "Disposable Teens" on the October 12, 2000 episode of BBC One's Top of the Pops.[68] On October 27, the band launched their worldwide Guns, God and Government Tour.[54][69] Video footage and photographs from shows at the Minneapolis Orpheum Theatre and the Milwaukee Eagles Ballroom (showing them performing "Disposable Teens" and "The Fight Song") were posted on the band's website November 2.[70]
From November 1 to November 13, the UK division of Nothing/Interscope Records held a contest to promote the album and launch the UK version of the band's website. The contest invited fans to log onto the site daily to pick up a series of coded clues which led to a message linked to the album. Fans who solved the riddle received an exclusive download, and were entered into a drawing for a one-week trip for two to meet Manson in Hollywood, California.[71]
In mid-2001, Universal Music Group was criticized for airing commercials promoting the album on MTV's Total Request Live.[72] Manson suspected that Senator and former Democratic vice-presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman played a role in the criticism.[72] Lieberman had recently introduced the Media Marketing Accountability Act (banning the marketing of violent and sexually-explicit media to minors) in Congress.[73][74] The proposed legislation stemmed from a Federal Trade Commission investigation he and Senators Sam Brownback and Orrin Hatch requested from US President Bill Clinton at the May 4, 1999 Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation hearing on entertainment-industry marketing practices to minors.[20][21][75][76]
Release



This is the final piece of a triptych that I began with Antichrist Superstar. The character of Omēga [from Mechanical Animals] has been disposed of, as he was a ruse to lure the commercial mall-goers into the web of destruction that I've always planned since the beginning.
—Marilyn Manson[28]
On February 29, 2000, Manson confirmed that the album was on track for a fall 2000 release.[23] On August 2, the singer announced a new release date of October 24 and posted a draft of the track listing. Manson then began posting weekly updates on the website, giving fans free access to previews of new songs and artwork.[77] On August 25, the track listing was released.[33]
On September 18, Manson announced that the album's US release was postponed to November 14 (to fine-tune the final mix) and its first single would be "Disposable Teens".[26][49][78] The album was released on November 13, 2000 in the UK and on December 5 in Japan by Nothing and Interscope Records.[79]
On the evening of November 14, 2000, Manson, Ramirez, and John 5 took a break from the tour to celebrate the album with a brief invitation-only acoustic set at the Saci nightclub in New York City. Tickets were given out in radio contests, on the band's website and to the first 100 album buyers at Tower Records on Broadway in New York. The set consisted of four songs, including a cover of John Lennon's "Working Class Hero" and "Suicide Is Painless", theme of the film (and TV series) M*A*S*H. Manson noted that the latter song "[was] far more depressing than anything I could have ever written".[64][80] The following day, he appeared on Total Request Live in a segment entitled "Mothers Against Marilyn Manson".[80] The band performed "Disposable Teens" on MTV's New Year's Eve celebration (with a cover of Cheap Trick's "Surrender") and on January 8, 2001 at the American Music Awards.[81][82]
Singles
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) spawned three singles, the first two of which were released in three versions. The first, "Disposable Teens", debuted as a music video (directed by Samuel Bayer)[71][83] on Total Request Live October 25, 2000.[71][83] During the following weeks, it was released as two standalone single EPs. The first version, "Disposable Teens Pt.1", was released on November 6 in the UK[71][84] and features Manson's cover of "Working Class Hero".[85] It was rereleased as a maxi single in the UK on August 21, 2002.[86] The second version, "Disposable Teens Pt.2", followed on November 14, 2000 and features a cover of "Five to One" by The Doors.[87] This version was released in the UK as a maxi single on October 31, 2000 and a 12" picture disc vinyl EP on November 6.[88][89]
The second single, "The Fight Song", was also released in three versions. The first, "The Fight Song Pt.1", was released on January 29, 2001 in the US and February 19 in the UK;[90][91] the latter was a 12" picture disc vinyl EP.[92] Both feature a remix by Joey Jordison of the heavy metal band Slipknot.[91][93] The second version, "The Fight Song Pt.2", was released on February 2, 2001 in the US and March 6 in the UK.[94][95] The music video was directed by W.I.Z., and sparked controversy for its violent depiction of a football game between jocks and goths (which some thought exploited the Columbine tragedy).[82][90] Manson dismissed the claims as hype: "Flak is my job".[91]
On February 10, 2001 Manson indicated that the "The Nobodies" would be the album's third single.[96][97] The music video, directed by Paul Fedor, premiered on MTV in June.[72] Manson originally wanted to film the video in Russia "because the atmosphere, the desolation, the coldness and the architecture would really suit the song".[96] Another early plan was to incorporate the MTV stunt series Jackass, because the song was included in the show's soundtrack;[72] however, the idea was abandoned when the show drew the ire of Senator Joseph Lieberman.[72] The third single was released on September 3, 2001 in the UK and October 6, 2001 in the US.[98][99] A remixed version of the song later appeared in the 2001 Johnny Depp film From Hell.[100]
Cover and packaging
The album's artwork was designed by P. R. Brown and Marilyn Manson.[43] Manson began conceptualizing it as he wrote the songs, and Brown and Manson worked in tandem to realize the imagery after deciding to do the work themselves.[43] It features elements from alchemy and the tarot.[43]
The symbol for the planet Mercury (common in alchemy) is a logo. Expanding on its relationship to the album's concept, Manson said "It represents both the androgyne and the prima materia, which has been associated with Adam, the first man".[33]
The singer commissioned a redesigned set of fourteen Major Arcana tarot cards, based on the Rider-Waite deck.[46] He explained that his interest in tarot was grounded in an attraction to its symbolism, not divination.[46] The cards depict each member of the band in a surrealistic tableau.[46] Each card was reinterpreted, reflecting the iconography of the album;[43] the Emperor, with prosthetic legs, is sitting in a wheelchair clutching a rifle in front of an American flag; the Fool is stepping off a cliff, with grainy images of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and a JFK campaign poster in the background, and Justice weighs the Bible against the brain on his balance scale.[46] The album's inner sleeve has nine of these cards: the Magician, the Devil, the Emperor, the Hermit, the Fool, Justice, the High Priestess, Death and The Hierophant.[43][46] The remaining cards are the Star, the World, the Tower and the Hanged Man.[46]
The cover art, which portrays Manson as a crucified Christ with his jawbone torn off, is intended as a criticism of censorship and America's obsession with media martyrs.[26] It is a cropped version of the reinterpreted Hanged Man card.[43] Under it is an obscured copy of the coroner's report for John F. Kennedy with the words "clinical record" and "autopsy".[101] The Marilyn Manson typeface uses the same font as the Disney World logo of the 1960s.[48] Manson explained the cover: "I think it's more offensive to Christians for me to say, 'I believe in the story of Christ and I enjoy the images that you present, but for different reasons than you'. I've taken my own interpretation, that's more offensive than Antichrist Superstar, and just completely disvaluing it. I'm going to turn a bunch of kids onto Christianity in my own sick, twisted way".[48]
The cover was controversial; some copies were issued with a cardboard sleeve featuring an alternative cover, since some retailers refused to stock the album with the original artwork.[63][102] A pastor in Memphis, Tennessee threatened to go on a hunger strike unless the album was pulled from shelves.[56] Manson described these actions as attempts at censorship: "the irony is that my point of the photo on the album was to show people that the crucifixion of Christ is, indeed, a violent image. My jaw is missing as a symbol of this very kind of censorship. This doesn't piss me off as much as it pleases me, because those offended by my album cover have successfully proven my point".[1][102] Gigwise ranked the cover 16th on its list of "The 50 Most Controversial Album Covers Of All Time!"[103]
Formats
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) was released in three formats. The standard jewel-case CD release has an enhanced CD, a gatefold booklet and a card-stock outer slipcase.[32] The UK limited-edition CD features a bonus acoustic version of "The Nobodies", while the Japanese limited-edition CD has the UK bonus track and a live version of "Mechanical Animals".[104] Universal Music Japan released a remastered version of the album in Super-High-Material CD (SHM-CD) on December 3, 2008 and a limited-edition 10th-anniversary commemorative reissue in 2010.[105][106][107] The vinyl LP release was pressed on two black discs and contained in a gatefold paperboard slipcase.[108] The cassette release contained a single cassette tape, a gatefold booklet and a card-stock outer slipcase.[109] Amazon.com has offered a digital MP3 version since November 14, 2000.[110]
Reception
From critics

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores

Source
Rating
Metacritic 72/100[111]
Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4.5/5 stars[112]
Robert Christgau (dud)[113]
Entertainment Weekly B[114]
Q 4/5 stars[115]
Melody Maker 4/5 stars[116]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[117]
NME 8/10[118]
Drowned in Sound 10/10[119]
PopMatters favorable[50]
Holy Wood received positive reviews from most critics.[120] At Metacritic (which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics) the album received an average score of 72 based on 14 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[120] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic praised it as "the definitive Marilyn Manson album, since it's tuneful and abrasive". He complimented the band for "figur[ing] out [how] to meld the hooks and subtle sonic shading of Mechanical Animals with the ugly, neo-industrial metallicisms of Antichrist [Superstar]", and said that "much of its charm lies in Manson trying so hard, perfecting details ... there's so much effort, Holy Wood winds up a stronger and more consistent album than any of his other work. If there's any problem, it's that Manson's shock rock seems a little quaint in 2000 ...[However,] it's to Warner's [frontman Marilyn Manson] credit as, yes, an artist that Holy Wood works anyway".[112]
Barry Walters of Rolling Stone said, "The band truly rocks: Its malevolent groove fleshes out its leader's usual complaints with an exhilarating swagger that's the essence of rock and roll".[117] LA Weekly was similarly impressed, pointing out that "almost all [the songs] contain a double-take chord change or a textural overdose or a mind-blowing bridge, and they'll be terroristic in concert".[121] Revolver magazine editor Christopher Scapelliti was impressed by the record's earnestness: "For all Holy Wood's well-tempered melodies and drunken pandemonium, what comes across loudest on the album is not the music but the sense of injury expressed in Manson's lyrics. Like Plastic Ono Band, John Lennon's bare-boned solo debut, Holy Wood screams with a primal fury that's evident even in its quietest moments".[31] According to Billboard magazine, the album proved that Manson is "one of the most skilled lyricists in rock today".[121]
Other critics were less impressed. Drowned in Sound (which assigns a normalized rating out of 10) gave the album a score of 10; however, they noted "There [are] a number of criticisms that could come Marilyn Manson's way: too much more of the same, too much philosophical posing, too much sloganeering. Regardless, all this needs to attain perfection is a few minutes shaved off of the overall running time ...[and] lyrically it actually says something intelligent for once and musically it has a lot more variation and scope than the Limp Bizkits of the world".[119] PopMatters agreed: "The central flaw of Holy Wood is that the power of its message, an important and provocative one, is watered down by its artistic pretensions. While Holy Wood is often affecting, it would be a better album if it was shorter and dealt with its subject matter directly, instead of through the veil of the 'concept album'."[50] Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times was also disappointed that Holy Wood did not live up to "the promise of Mechanical Animals". In contrast to Erlewine of Allmusic, he viewed the musical cross-pollination of Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals as confusion on the band's part about "where to turn [musically], as if uncertain which is the right move commercially in a rock world taken over by Limp Bizkit and Eminem". He concluded that "[t]his is music that sounds reasonable on the radio but crumbles under scrutiny".[122] Joshua Klein of The A.V. Club was also unconvinced, remarking that "[this] sort of agitprop is thoroughly predictable, and the only thing that could prove shocking about Manson's antics would be if the singer actually evinced any power over his followers. Here, he seems entranced by his own power, which may be why his dark worldview sounds baseless even as he offers sharp hooks others would kill for".[123]
Sales
Since early critical appraisal of Holy Wood was far less favorable than the band's previous effort, Mechanical Animals, many critics and retailers wondered if the band still had commercial appeal on the early-2000s music scene. Best Buy's 2000 sales projections estimated its first-week sales at about 150,000 units nationally, significantly less than the 223,000 units sold by Mechanical Animals during its first week.[124] In the US the album debuted (and peaked) at No. 13 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 117,000, an initial commercial disappointment.[125]
The album spent 13 consecutive weeks on the charts before dropping off on March 3, 2001, making it the shortest-charting full-length LP by the band until The High End of Low (2009).[126] It was overshadowed by Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals (which spent 52 and 33 weeks on the charts, respectively).[126] The album's sales figures were dismal, and it took three years to attain a gold certification from the RIAA (in March 2003) for shipments of over 500,000 units.[127] However, in four other countries (Australia, Austria, Italy and Sweden) the album peaked in the top 10;[128] in the UK, it peaked at No. 23.[129] As of 2011 the album has sold over nine million copies worldwide, making it one of the most successful in the band's catalogue.[130]
Seventeen months after Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)‍ '​s release, Manson commented on the album's lackluster US sales.[131] He attributed the lack of commercial appeal to the musical climate of the time, but argued that it stood up comparatively well to contemporary rock albums.[131] Manson noted that the band's US sales figures are usually one or two million records, and did not find the sales figures disappointing.[131]
Accolades
In 2001 Kerrang! named Holy Wood the year's best album at their annual Kerrang! Awards.[132] Manson sardonically remarked, "[there is] nothing like a good school shooting to inspire a record" when he collected the award.[133]
Kerrang! ranked Holy Wood ninth on their 2000 list of albums of the year.[134] The British magazine NME ranked the album 34th in their critic's picks for the 50 best albums of 2000 in their "Decade In Music" series, calling it "a series of heroic rallying cries for the disenfranchised, while also baiting the American Far Right for all it's worth".[135] The album ranked 30th in the Critics Top 50[136] and 9th in the popular poll[137] of the German magazine Musik Express/Sounds in their 2000 Albums of the Year. The French edition of the British magazine Rock Sound ranked Holy Wood 15th in Le choix de la rédaction (the editor's choice) and 5th in Le choix des lecteurs (readers' choice) of their Choix des critiques (critics' choice) of 2000 Albums of the Year.[138] The British magazine Record Collector also ranked the album on their Best of 2000 list.[139]
Legacy
In their November 10, 2010 issue Kerrang! published a 10th-anniversary commemorative article on the album, "Screaming For Vengeance",[1] calling it "Manson's finest hour". "Set against the backdrop of what the rest of the rock and metal world were attempting at the turn of the century—Limp Bizkit were parading their jockishness with Chocolate Starfish And The Hot Dog Flavored Water and Disturbed were unveiling their contrived anger with The Sickness, for example—it put the singer into a league of his own ...[and] a decade on, there has still not been as eloquent and savage a musical attack on the media and mainstream culture as Manson achieved with Holy Wood ...[It is] still scathingly relevant today ... perhaps that's where Holy Wood achieved its greatest success. In deflecting the attention that was targeted at him back onto the media, they reacted exactly as he knew they would: by blustering and further exposing their own inadequacies ... The shame of it all, though, is that so little has changed. That the album is still so relevant today suggests it failed in its task of changing attitudes. That it exists at all, though, is a credit to a man who refused to sit and take it, but instead come out swinging."[1]
Guns, God and Government Tour
Main article: Guns, God and Government Tour
To promote the album, the band began a worldwide stadium tour (the Guns, God and Government Tour) three days after its scheduled release date and seventeen days before its actual launch.[54][69] From October 27, 2000 to September 2, 2001, the tour had six legs spanning Eurasia, Japan and North America with 107 shows (out of 109 planned).[54] Typical of the band, the concerts were theatrical[69] and lasted an average of one hour and forty minutes. Sets were designed with communist, religious and "Celebritarian" imagery.[140] Manson had a number of costume changes during each show: a bishop's dalmatic and mitre (often confused with papal regalia); a costume made from animals (including epaulettes made from a horse's tail and a shirt made from skinned goat heads and ostrich spines); his signature black leather corset, g-string and garter stockings; an elaborate Roman legionary-style imperial galea; an Allgemeine SS-style peaked police cap; a black-and-white fur coat, and a large conical skirt which lifted him 12 metres (39 ft) in the air.[69][141][142]
The Ozzfest leg marked the band's first performance in Denver, Colorado (on June 22, 2001 at Mile High Stadium) after the Columbine High School massacre in Littleton.[143] After initially canceling due to a scheduling conflict, the band changed their plans to play the Denver date.[143] The group's decision met resistance from conservative groups; Manson received death threats and demands to skip the date.[144][145] A group of church leaders and families related to Columbine formed an organization opposing the show, Citizens for Peace and Respect, which was supported by Colorado governor Bill Owens and representative Tom Tancredo. On their website, the ad hoc group claimed that the band "promotes hate, violence, death, suicide, drug use, and the attitudes and actions of the Columbine killers".[143][146] In response, Manson issued a statement:

I am truly amazed that after all this time, religious groups still need to attack entertainment and use these tragedies as a pitiful excuse for their own self-serving publicity. In response to their protests, I will provide a show where I balance my songs with a wholesome Bible reading. This way, fans will not only hear my so-called, 'violent' point of view, but we can also examine the virtues of wonderful 'Christian' stories of disease, murder, adultery, suicide and child sacrifice. Now that seems like 'entertainment' to me.[147]
Two films of the concert tour were made. The Guns, God and Government DVD, released by Eagle Rock Entertainment on October 29, 2002, featured live concert footage from performances in Los Angeles, Europe and Japan.[148][149] It also included a 30-minute behind-the-scenes featurette, The Death Parade, with guest appearances by Ozzy Osbourne and Eminem.[149] Seven years later, it was followed by Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. Released on Blu-ray by Eagle Rock Entertainment (a division of Eagle Records) on November 17, 2009, it depicts the entire sixteen-song set of the final show of the tour – the Los Angeles performance.[150][151]
Track listing
All lyrics written by Manson[32][112].

A: In the Shadow

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "GodEatGod"   Manson 2:34
2. "The Love Song"   Ramirez, 5 3:16
3. "The Fight Song"   5 2:55
4. "Disposable Teens"   5, Ramirez 3:01

D: The Androgyne

No.
Title
Music
Length

5. "Target Audience (Narcissus Narcosis)"   Ramirez, 5 4:18
6. ""President Dead""   Ramirez, 5, Gacy 3:13
7. "In the Shadow of the Valley of Death"   Ramirez, 5 4:09
8. "Cruci-Fiction in Space"   Ramirez, 5, Gacy 4:56
9. "A Place in the Dirt"   5 3:37

A: Of Red Earth

No.
Title
Music
Length

10. "The Nobodies"   5, Manson 3:35
11. "The Death Song"   5, Manson 3:29
12. "Lamb of God"   Ramirez 4:39
13. "Born Again"   Ramirez, 5 3:20
14. "Burning Flag"   Ramirez, 5 3:21

M: The Fallen

No.
Title
Music
Length

15. "Coma Black: a) Eden Eye b) The Apple of Discord"   Manson, 5, Ramirez 5:58
16. "Valentine's Day"   Ramirez, Manson 3:31
17. "The Fall of Adam"   Ramirez, 5 2:34
18. "King Kill 33º"   Ramirez 2:18
19. "Count to Six and Die (The Vacuum of Infinite Space Encompassing)"   5 3:24

Bonus tracks[104]

No.
Title
Music
Length

20. "The Nobodies" (Acoustic Version; Japan/UK editions only) Manson. 5 3:35
21. "Mechanical Animals" (Live; Japan edition only) Manson, Ramirez, Zum 4:41
Notes
The disc contains a data track leading to a video no longer hosted by Interscope's website,[32] but later included as a secret track on the companion DVD of Lest We Forget.[152]
Charts and certifications

Album charts

Charts (2000)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[128] 8
Austria (Ö3)[128] 6
Belgium (Flanders) (Ultratop 50)[128][153] 34
Belgium (Wallonia) (Ultratop)[128] 29
Canada (CANOE)[126][154] 13
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[128] 25
France (SNEP)[128] 12
Germany (Media Control)[155] 11
Ireland (IRMA)[156] 21
Italy (FIMI)[128] 7
Japan (Oricon)[157] 14
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[128] 53
New Zealand (RIANZ)[128] 18
Norway (VG-Lista)[128] 12
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[128] 7
Switzerland (Hitparade)[128] 20
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 23
United States Billboard 200[126][154] 13
Billboard Top Internet Albums[126][154] 10

Certifications

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual sales
Canada CRIA Gold[159] 50,000+ —
Switzerland IFPI Gold[160] 20,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[161] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Gold[127] 500,000+ —

Singles


Single
Chart (2000)
Peak
 position
"Disposable Teens" Australia (ARIA)[162] 24
France (SNEP)[162] 67
Italy (FIMI)[162] 7
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[162] 99
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[162] 52
Switzerland (Hitparade)[162] 73
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 12
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[163] 22
Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[163] 24

Single
Chart (2001)
Peak
 position
"The Fight Song" Austria (Ö3)[164] 59
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[164] 19
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 24

Single
Chart (2001)
Peak
 position
"The Nobodies" Austria (Ö3)[165] 56
France (SNEP)[165] 94
Italy (FIMI)[165] 17
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[165] 8
Switzerland (Hitparade)[165] 96
United Kingdom (OCC)[158] 34

Credits and personnel


Marilyn Manson[166]Marilyn Manson – arranger, vocals, producer, art direction, concept, syncussion, optigan, mellotron, distorted flute, synth bass, keyboards, piano, electric harpsichord, rhythm guitar
Twiggy Ramirez – bass, guitar (rhythm, lead, Leslie, warped), keyboards
John 5 – guitar (lead, rhythm, acoustic, synth, electric, slide, phase)
Madonna Wayne Gacy – synths, ambiance, keyboards, samples, bass synth, synth strings, mellotron, sound effects
Ginger Fish – drums (live, drum machine), sound effects, keyboards

Production[166]Bon Harris of Nitzer Ebb – synthesizers, programming, pre-production editing, organic drum programming, bass, keyboard, synth bass, sleigh bells, electronics, piano
Paulie Northfield – additional engineering
D. Sardy (Dave Sardy) – producer, synths, (organic) drum programming, mixing, rhythm guitar
P.R. Brown – art direction, design, photography
Greg Fidelman – engineer
Nick Raskulinecz – assistant engineer
Joe Zook – assistant engineer
Kevin Guarnieri – assistant engineer
Danny Saber – additional loops
Alex Suttle – backing vocals

References
Notes
1.Jump up ^ Harris and Klebold appeared on the May 3, 1999, cover of Time, titled The Monsters Next Door, along with their victims. The killer's pictures are colored and superimposed over their victims' school photos, which are noticeably smaller, and in black and white.[59] They appeared again on Time‍ '​s December 20, 1999, cover, titled The Columbine Tapes. This time the picture depicts only the killers—with their weapons—in a screenshot taken from the school's surveillance camera of the cafeteria during the rampage.[60]
Footnotes
1.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Bryant, Tom (2010-11-10). "Screaming For Vengeance". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (1338): 40–42.
2.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j Lanham, Tom (November 2000). "Marilyn Manson: Absinthe Makes The Heart Grow Fonder". Alternative Press (Alternative Press Magazine, Inc.) (148): 76–86.
3.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Kessler, Ted (2000-09-09). "Marilyn Manson Goes Ape". NME (IPC Media): 28–31.
4.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Rolling Stone Album Guide for Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-07-21.
5.^ Jump up to: a b Strauss, Neil (1997-05-17). "A Bogey Band to Scare Parents With". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
6.^ Jump up to: a b c France, Lisa Respers (2009-04-20). "Columbine left its indelible mark on pop culture". CNN (Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (Time Warner)). Retrieved 2010-11-17.
7.^ Jump up to: a b Cullen, Dave (1999-09-23). "Inside the Columbine High investigation". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
8.Jump up ^ O'Connor, Christopher (1999-04-27). "Colorado Tragedy Continues To Spark Manson Bashing". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
9.Jump up ^ Jones 2002, pp. 126–127
10.Jump up ^ Meegan, Holland (2009-04-20). "Columbine High School massacre on 10th anniversary: 5 myths surrounding deadliest school attack in U.S. history". The Grand Rapids Press (Advance Magazine Publishers, Inc. D.B.A. Booth Newspapers, Inc). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
11.Jump up ^ Burk, Greg (2001-01-18). "Marilyn:A Re-Examination (page 1)". LA Weekly (Village Voice Media). Retrieved 2010-11-22.
12.Jump up ^ Uhelszki, Jaan (1999-08-13). "Lynyrd Skynyrd Threaten Marilyn Manson With a Can of Whoop Ass". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
13.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Postpones U.S. Tour Dates". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-04-28. Retrieved 2011-03-21.
14.^ Jump up to: a b "Outraged Senators Write To Manson's Label". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-04-29. Retrieved 2011-05-03.
15.^ Jump up to: a b O'Connor, Christopher (1999-05-01). "Politicians Go On Offensive Against Marilyn Manson". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-04.
16.Jump up ^ Sterngold, James (1999-04-29). "Terror in Littleton: The Culture; Rock Concerts Are Cancelled". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2010-11-22.
17.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson (1999-05-28). "Columbine: Whose Fault Is It?". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Wenner Media LLC) (815).
18.Jump up ^ O'Connor, Christopher (1999-06-01). "Manson Rants, Raves, Reacts In Rolling Stone Essay". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-04.
19.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: The Write To Be Wrong". NME. IPC Media. 1999-05-01. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
20.^ Jump up to: a b c d e O'Connor, Christopher (1999-05-04). "Senators Criticize Marilyn Manson, Nine Inch Nails At Hearing". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-03.
21.^ Jump up to: a b Tapper, Jake (2000-08-29). "Hollywood on trial". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
22.^ Jump up to: a b c Long, April (2000-11-10). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) album review". NME. IPC Media. Retrieved 2010-12-02.
23.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Basham, David (2000-02-29). "Marilyn Manson Tweaks "Holy Wood" Plans". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-22.
24.Jump up ^ Michael, Ibrahim (August 2000). "Welcome To Hollywood". Hammer Edge.
25.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Rushfield, Richard (November 2000). "The Antichrist's Cross". CMJ New Music Monthly (College Media Inc.) (87): 46–51.
26.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Marilyn Manson Unveils Tour Plans, First Single For Holy Wood". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
27.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m McCaughey, Brian (2000-08-05). "This Is My Holy Wood". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (813): 4–7.
28.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Basham, David (1999-12-16). "Manson To Walk In The "Valley Of Death" For Next LP". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
29.^ Jump up to: a b c Norris, John (1999-11-24). "'Marilyn Manson To Probe Celebrity And Suffering In New Film, Next Album.". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
30.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson's Unholy Doings". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-08-03. Retrieved 2011-04-03.
31.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Christopher Scapelliti (Winter 2000). "Dark Angel". Revolver (Future US, Inc.): 72–77.
32.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Enhanced". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
33.^ Jump up to: a b c d Basham, David (2000-08-25). "Manson Expands On "Adam" Concept For New LP". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
34.^ Jump up to: a b c Hochman, Steve (2000-07-20). "The Third Face of Marilyn Manson". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media LLC) (845).
35.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h VanHorn, Teri (1999-12-16). "Marilyn Manson: Upcoming Album 'Unlike' Predecessors". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-05.
36.Jump up ^ "Manson To Reveal Album Title Online". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-12-09. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
37.^ Jump up to: a b c Simunek, Chris (February 2001). Skye, Dan; Bienenstock, David; Hager, Steven, eds. "Tinseltown Rebellion: Marilyn Manson In The City Of Angels". High Times (Tom Forcade) 306: 52–58. Retrieved 2011-04-30.
38.^ Jump up to: a b Young, Simon (2000-11-11). "He Hits the Keyboards. His Friends Call Him Pogo. He Jumps Through Windows for Fun". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
39.^ Jump up to: a b Young, Simon (2000-11-11). "You Know Him As a Drummer; He Calls Himself the Bodyguard". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
40.^ Jump up to: a b Winwood, Ian (2000-11-11). "Manson's Right Hand Man on Fame, Failure and Masturbating with Pizza Dough". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 18–23.
41.Jump up ^ Arnum, Eric (2000-02-23). "Marilyn Manson Lectures At Alternative-Information Conference". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-03.
42.^ Jump up to: a b "Manson Launches New Posthuman Label". NME. IPC Media. 2000-04-12. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Alexander, Phil (2000-11-11). "The Holy War". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (827): 44–45. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
44.^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Kara (1999-11-16). "Marilyn Manson Discusses Post-Columbine Shell Shock". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
45.Jump up ^ "Satanic Cult Meeting". NME. IPC Media. 1999-11-16. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
46.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Palahniuk, Chuck (November 2000). "Destiny's Child". Gear Magazine (Bob Guccione, Jr.): 73.
47.Jump up ^ "Alien Autopsy: Marilyn Manson and David Duchovny on Area 51". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (Future US). February 2005.
48.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Gargano, Paul (March 2001). "Holy Wars: The Ground Campaign Begins". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media): 6–12.
49.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Myers, Ben (2000-11-18). "Holy Wood". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (831): 29–36.
50.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Robinson, Charlotte (2000-12-14). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) album review". PopMatters. Sarah Zupko. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
51.Jump up ^ Segal, David (2000-11-27). "Welcome to His Nightmare: Acceptance". Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
52.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Revolution in Action". Rock Sound (Editions Freeway) (11). 2001-01-08.
53.^ Jump up to: a b c Manson, Marilyn (2000-12-01). Marilyn Manson: No Regrets. Interview with Kurt Loder. MTV Networks (Viacom). MTV. New York.
54.^ Jump up to: a b c d Burk, Greg (2001-01-18). "Marilyn:A Re-Examination (page 2)". LA Weekly (Village Voice Media). Retrieved 2010-08-22.
55.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "The 'Holy..' Bible!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-08-29. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
56.^ Jump up to: a b c Clark, Stuart (2001-02-01). "No More Mister Nasty Guy". Hot Press 25 (2). Retrieved 2011-04-30.
57.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (1999-12-30). "Last Poll Of The Century". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Millennium Special ed.) (Wenner Media LLC) (830).
58.Jump up ^ Paul Gargano (July 1999). "Revelations of an Alien-Messiah". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media) 44: 08–13.
59.Jump up ^ "The Monsters Next Door (May 3, 1999 cover of Time magazine)". Time. Time Inc. (Time Warner). 1999-05-03. Retrieved 2011-05-24.
60.Jump up ^ "The Columbine Tapes (December 20, 1999 cover of Time magazine)". Time. Time Inc. (Time Warner). 1999-12-20. Retrieved 2011-05-24.
61.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (2001-08-20). Children at Risk: Marilyn Manson Interview. Interview with Bill O'Reilly. The O'Reilly Factor. Fox News Channel (News Corporation). New York. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
62.^ Jump up to: a b c "Marilyn Manson's Big Day Out". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-08-30. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
63.^ Jump up to: a b Manson, Marilyn (2000-11-15). Mothers Against Marilyn Manson. Interview with Carson Daly. MTV Networks (Viacom). Total Request Live (TRL). MTV. New York.
64.^ Jump up to: a b Mancini, Robert (2000-11-15). "Marilyn Manson Marks Holy Wood Release With Acoustic Set". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
65.Jump up ^ "Manson Works On New LP, Screenplay". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 1999-06-09. Retrieved 2011-04-05.
66.^ Jump up to: a b Moss, Corey (2000-02-17). "Marilyn Manson Covers Charles Manson Song". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-05.
67.Jump up ^ "Manson Brings You '...Love'". NME. IPC Media. 2000-08-10. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
68.Jump up ^ "'Teens' Sensation". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-10. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
69.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Give 'Em Enough Pope". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-30. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
70.Jump up ^ "Maz Gets 'Netted". NME. IPC Media. 2000-11-02. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
71.^ Jump up to: a b c d "Teenage Sensation!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-10-24. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
72.^ Jump up to: a b c d e Chirazi, Steffan (June 2001). "Marilyn Manson: Moral Minority". Metal Edge (Zenbu Media).
73.Jump up ^ "Entertainment industry an issue, asset for presidential campaign". CNN (Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (Time Warner)). 2000-11-06. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
74.Jump up ^ "Lieberman steps up Hollywood attack". BBC News (BBC). 2001-07-06. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
75.Jump up ^ Eszterhas, Joe (2000-09-14). "They came, they caved". Salon. Salon Media Group. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
76.Jump up ^ "Hollywood denies 'selling violence'". BBC News (BBC). 2000-09-12. Retrieved 2011-05-04.
77.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-08-02). "Manson Reveals Date, Tracks For "Holy Wood"". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
78.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Manson Moves "Holy Wood" Date, Preps Tour Plans". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-27.
79.Jump up ^ "Punk's Not Dead!". NME. 2000-11-13. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
80.^ Jump up to: a b "'...Wood' You Believe It?". NME. IPC Media. 2000-11-10. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
81.Jump up ^ vanHorn, Teri (2001-01-10). "Marilyn Manson Denies Video Has Columbine Link". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-02.
82.^ Jump up to: a b Moss, Corey (2001-01-03). "Goths Battle Jocks In Upcoming Marilyn Manson Video". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-02.
83.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Announces First Leg Of World Tour". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). 2000-09-22. Retrieved 2011-04-03.
84.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens pt. 1". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
85.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens 1 [Single, Import]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
86.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens Pt. 1 [Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
87.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [Single, Import]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
88.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [12" Vinyl]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
89.Jump up ^ "Disposable Teens #2 [Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
90.^ Jump up to: a b "See Stills From New Manson Video". NME. IPC Media. 2001-02-13. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
91.^ Jump up to: a b c "Manson Comes Out Fighting". NME. IPC Media. 2001-01-11. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
92.Jump up ^ "Fight Song [12" Vinyl] [Single, Limited Edition]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
93.Jump up ^ "Manson Gets 'Knotted". NME. IPC Media. 2001-01-09. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
94.Jump up ^ "Fight Song [CD 2] [Single, Maxi]". Amazon UK. Retrieved 2011-07-17.
95.Jump up ^ "The Fight Song Pt.2 [Import, Single]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
96.^ Jump up to: a b Myers, Ben (2001-02-10). "The Devil Rides Out". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (839): 12–17.
97.Jump up ^ "It's Goth To Talk". NME. IPC Media. 2001-04-30. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
98.Jump up ^ "'Nobodies' Here!". NME. IPC Media. 2001-08-21. Retrieved 2011-06-11.
99.Jump up ^ "Nobodies [Import, Single]". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
100.Jump up ^ Wiederhorn, Jon (2001-11-01). "Marilyn Manson Cover 'Tainted Love,' Record Live DVD". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-01.
101.Jump up ^ "Christ Almighty!". NME. IPC Media. 2000-09-26. Retrieved 2011-03-30.
102.^ Jump up to: a b Schumacher-Rasmussen, Eric (2000-11-14). "Newsbrief: Two Chains Balk At Marilyn Manson Album Cover". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-04-03.
103.Jump up ^ "The 50 Most Controversial Album Covers Of All Time!". Gigwise. Giant Digital. Retrieved 2011-03-16.
104.^ Jump up to: a b "Holy Wood (Extra Tracks, Import)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
105.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (Original Recording Remastered, Import)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
106.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood Amazon Search". Amazon. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
107.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Limited Reissue". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
108.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Vinyl". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
109.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) Audio Cassette". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
110.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) MP3 Download". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
111.Jump up ^ http://www.metacritic.com/music/holy-wood-in-the-shadow-of-the-valley-of-death
112.^ Jump up to: a b c Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) [Enhanced] review". AllMusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
113.Jump up ^ Christgau, Robert. "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)". The Village Voice (Village Voice Media). Retrieved 2011-03-11.
114.Jump up ^ Sinclair, Tom (2000-11-17). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. (Time Warner). Retrieved 2011-03-11.
115.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000): Critic reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2011-04-11.
116.Jump up ^ Melody Maker (11/14/00, p.50) - 4 stars out of 5 - "...Compelling....A pouting, teeth-baring, stranger-snogging tart of an album, a glorious, blistering cacophony, an explosive death-glam rampage. Marilyn is to T.Rex what jungle is to techno..."
117.^ Jump up to: a b Walter, Barry (2000-11-23). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) review". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
118.Jump up ^ NME (Magazine) (11/11/00, p.32) - 8 out of 10 - "...Melds the glam-frocked space-rock of MECHANICAL ANIMALS with the industrial crunch of ANTICHRIST, he has hit upon something thrilling....brilliantly executed..."
119.^ Jump up to: a b Price, Dale (2000-11-13). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death)". Drowned in Sound. Silentway Ltd. Retrieved 2011-03-11.
120.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson: Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000): Summary". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2010-11-15.
121.^ Jump up to: a b "Critic Reviews for Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) – Marilyn Manson". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
122.Jump up ^ Hilburn, Robert (2000-11-12). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) LA Times Record Rack review". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved 2011-04-08.
123.Jump up ^ Klein, Joshua (2000-11-14). "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) AV Club music review". The A.V. Club. The Onion, Inc. Retrieved 2011-03-09.
124.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson May Be In for a Shock". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). 2000-11-20. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
125.Jump up ^ Dansby, Andrew (2003-05-21). "Manson Golden at Number One". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media LLC. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
126.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "Billboard 200 and Canadian Albums charting". Billboard 200. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
127.^ Jump up to: a b "RIAA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
128.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (Album)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
129.Jump up ^ "The Official UK Charts Database Search for Marilyn Manson". The Official Charts Company (OCC). Retrieved 2011-03-24.
130.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Eagle Rock Entertainment. Retrieved 2011-01-04.
131.^ Jump up to: a b c Winwood, Ian (2002-03-23). "Paranoia, Jail Sentences, September 11 and Kittens?". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group) (896).
132.Jump up ^ "Manson wins Kerrang! honour". BBC News. BBC. 2001-08-28. Retrieved 2010-11-19.
133.Jump up ^ "'Holy' Shitstorm!". NME. IPC Media. 2001-08-29. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
134.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! Albums Of The Year 2000". Kerrang!. Bauer Media Group. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
135.Jump up ^ "50 best albums of 2000". NME. IPC Media. 2009-06-11. Retrieved 2011-04-01.
136.Jump up ^ "Kritiker Top 50 die fünfzig besten Alben 2000". Musik-Express/Sounds (in German). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
137.Jump up ^ "Pop Poll 2000 Album des Jahres". Musik-Express/Sounds (in German). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
138.Jump up ^ "Rock Sound Choix des critiques depuis 1993". Rock Sound (in French). Editions Freeway. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
139.Jump up ^ "10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century". Record Collector (Diamond Publishing) (257). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
140.Jump up ^ "A Day in the Life of Marilyn Manson". Kerrang! (Bauer Media Group). 2000-02-10.
141.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Muses On Politics As He Prepares For Tour". Star Tribune (The Star Tribune Company). 2000-10-26.
142.Jump up ^ Mancini, Robert (2001-06-12). "Metal Scrapes Against Metal At Ozzfest Opener". VH1. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-05-02.
143.^ Jump up to: a b c "Denver of Iniquity?". NME. IPC Media. 2001-05-08. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
144.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: 'I'm Always Going To Be Bad'". Blabbermouth.Net. Borivoj Krgin. 2007-06-02. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
145.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: 'My Greatest Fear Has Always Been Not Being Able To Create'". Blabbermouth.Net. Borivoj Krgin. 2007-04-15. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
146.Jump up ^ D'Angelo, Joe (2001-05-21). "Colorado Governor, Congressman Support Anti-Manson Group". MTV News. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2012-05-15.
147.Jump up ^ "Manson To Lead Bible Studies Class". NME. IPC Media. 2001-05-13. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
148.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson – Guns, God and Government World Tour (2001)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-03-28.
149.^ Jump up to: a b LeVasseur, Andrea. "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government World Tour". MTV. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-28.
150.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A. [Blu-ray] (2009)". Amazon. Retrieved 2011-03-28.
151.Jump up ^ Seibert, Perry. "Marilyn Manson: Guns, God and Government – Live in L.A.". MTV. MTV Networks (Viacom). Retrieved 2011-03-28.
152.Jump up ^ "Lest We Forget: The Best of (Bonus Dvd) (Coll) [Explicit Lyrics]". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-16.
153.Jump up ^ "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (Album)". Ultratop. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
154.^ Jump up to: a b c "allmusic Billboard charts & awards". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2010-11-17.
155.Jump up ^ "Chartverfolgung / Marilyn Manson / Longplay" (in German). PhonoNet. Retrieved 2009-03-23.
156.Jump up ^ "Holy Wood ChartTrack". GfK. Retrieved 2011-01-18.
157.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson album sales ranking". Oricon. Retrieved June 22, 2012.
158.^ Jump up to: a b c d Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M – My Vitriol". Zobbel. Retrieved 2010-12-14.
159.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson". Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 2012-05-15.
160.Jump up ^ "Search for: Marilyn Manson" (in Swiss). The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community. Retrieved 2008-07-02.
161.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
162.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Disposable Teens (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
163.^ Jump up to: a b "Modern Rock Tracks charting". Billboard 200. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2010-09-18.
164.^ Jump up to: a b "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Fight Song (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
165.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Nobodies (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved 2011-03-05.
166.^ Jump up to: a b "Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) credits". allmusic. All Media Guide (Rovi). Retrieved 2010-11-17.
Bibliography
Jones, Steve (August 2002). Pop Music and the Press. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. ISBN 1-56639-966-1.
Manson, Marilyn (2003-05-15). "The Dead Rock Star". Rolling Stone (op-ed essay) (Wenner Media LLC) (922).
External links
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) at Interscope Records


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Antichrist Superstar

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Antichrist Superstar

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
October 8, 1996
Recorded
February 1996–August 1996 at Nothing Studios, New Orleans
Genre
Industrial metal, alternative metal, heavy metal, industrial rock, experimental[1]
Length
77:26
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor, Dave Ogilvie, Marilyn Manson, Sean Beavan
Marilyn Manson chronology

Smells Like Children
 (1995) Antichrist Superstar
 (1996) Remix & Repent
 (1997)


Singles from Antichrist Superstar
1."Antichrist Superstar"
 Released: 1996 (promotional)
2."The Beautiful People"
 Released: September 22, 1996
3."Tourniquet"
 Released: September 8, 1997
4."Man That You Fear"
 Released: 1997 (promotional)

Antichrist Superstar is the second full-length studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on October 8, 1996 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. The record's success in mainstream charts turned the band overnight into a household name and its frontman into a bona fide rock icon. This led to numerous protests from religious and civic groups such as the American Family Association due to the band's perceived anti-Christian stance as well as the transgressive and confrontational nature of their music, performance and appearance.
A rock opera concept album, it is the first installment in a trilogy which includes Mechanical Animals and Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death). After the release of Holy Wood, Manson said that the overarching story within the trilogy is presented in reverse chronological order; Antichrist Superstar, therefore, is the finale despite being the first to be chronologically released.[2] It was recorded at Nothing Studios in New Orleans and produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
The album has sold over 7 million copies worldwide,[3] with 1.9 million of those sold in the United States alone.[4] It spawned two commercial singles ("The Beautiful People" and "Tourniquet"), and an autobiography (The Long Hard Road Out of Hell). The band supported the album with the controversial Dead to the World Tour. The album debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200.[5]


Contents  [hide]
1 Background
2 Packaging
3 Singles and music videos
4 Reception 4.1 Critical reception
4.2 Commercial performance
4.3 Accolades
5 Dead to the World Tour
6 Track listing 6.1 Outtakes
7 Charts and certifications 7.1 Album
7.2 Certifications
7.3 Singles
8 Credits and personnel
9 References
10 External links

Background[edit]
The album's title is a takeoff on Andrew Lloyd Webber's 1971 musical Jesus Christ Superstar.[6] Similarly, the record is a rock opera[6] which, in an issue of Kerrang! magazine edited by the band's frontman, is stated as a tribute to—and inspired by—the works of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche.
After the release of Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), Marilyn Manson divulged that his concept album trilogy is an autobiographical story told in a reverse timeline (chronologically reverse from their actual release dates). That means Holy Wood opens the storyline followed by Mechanical Animals and concludes with Antichrist Superstar.[7] Furthermore, though Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals made sense as individual concept albums on their own, there was a hidden overarching story running through the three releases.
Packaging[edit]
Antichrist Superstar has elaborate packaging, consisting of a black cardstock sleeve covering the plastic jewel case with graphics of Manson on both the front and back, the latter of which is flanked by the red Superstar Shock logo and the Roman numerals IX, VI, III and VII. The booklet contains pictures of the band, a visual worm-to-angel metamorphosis, medical diagrams, printed lyrics to each song, and liner notes including traditional thanks and credits as well as a curious entry found under the lyrics to the song "Irresponsible Hate Anthem", stating it was recorded live on February 14, 1997, despite the album being released well before that in October 1996.
Also, found on the front of the album cover is a circle surrounded by the words Heart, Mind, Complacent, and Malice. If one folds the booklet just right they can also find the hidden words Heart, Mind, Complacent, and Malice made up of folding the words Heaven/Comfort, Minister/Fiend, Complaisant/Magnificent and Master/Lice respectively. The booklet also makes reference to Revelation chapter twelve, verses one to five, in the Bible.
The album, despite containing a gap of silence a few minutes long, is cyclical, as both opening and closing seconds include the distorted phrase "When you are suffering, know that I have betrayed you." When the album is placed on loop, the pacing between the sentences matches that of the additional distorted recitation found in the preceding hidden track. The names of the two latter cycles seem to be a reference to two films by avant-garde filmmaker Kenneth Anger: Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome and Lucifer Rising.
Singles and music videos[edit]




"Cryptorchid"








Problems playing this file? See media help.
"The Beautiful People" is the first single of Antichrist Superstar. The video was released on September 22, 1996 and directed by Canadian director and photographer Floria Sigismondi. According to Manson, the title "The Beautiful People" was inspired by a book that came out in the mid-1960s by Marilyn Bender. This book contains information on the life of the Kennedy family, politics, fashion and culture. Moreover, the single was awarded gold record certification by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), reached number twenty-six in the US Billboard and number eighteen in the UK. The music channel VH1 named this single twenty-eight of their 40 Greatest Metal Songs.
"Tourniquet" is the second single from the album. It was released on September 8, 1997 and was also directed by Floria Sigismondi. In the video Manson is a humanoid moving through a wheel. The band uses a variety of bizarre costumes for each scene. This is one of three music videos where Manson appears without makeup, the other two videos are "Get Your Gunn" and "Lunchbox".
"Cryptorchid" is the third video from the album. The video was directed by E. Elias Merhige and displays images from his 1991 experimental film Begotten. Some scenes were replaced by Manson to avoid the original publications of the tape.
"Antichrist Superstar" was released as the fourth video. The video was also directed by E. Elias Merhige and depicts Manson on a podium bearing a lightning bolt symbol. In one scene, Manson tears apart the Bible, dumping it on the public. Before its planned launch, the video was screened at the 1997 San Francisco Film Festival, however, Interscope Records was appalled by its content and prevented its release. In 2010, the unedited video of "Antichrist Superstar" was leaked on YouTube.
"Man That You Fear" was the last video from Antichrist Superstar. The music video was directed by W.I.Z. and adapted from the Shirley Jackson short story The Lottery. The video also contains aesthetic and symbolic references to the 1973 film The Wicker Man and the 1989 Alejandro Jodorowsky film Santa Sangre.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4.5/5 stars[8]
Entertainment Weekly B[9]
Robert Christgau (dud)[10]
Spin 8/10[11]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[12]



"Too many tracks over all – the better songs didn’t shine through all the bluster. An interesting parallel to the band line-up/musicians working on the album. It’s a great record but the (lyrical/literal) writing could have been so much stronger."
—Daisy Berkowitz in 2012[13]
The album received generally positive reviews by critics. Lorraine Ali of Rolling Stone commented "The rise of Marilyn Manson marks the end of the reign of punk realism in rock & roll [...] The layered effect of the music recalls that of Ministry, but Marilyn Manson's execution is not as dense. Instead, Antichrist Superstar writhes with a cool, sinister and taunting feel [...] before lurching out from the shadows with hammering percussion and static-loaded feedback [...] For all of the album's attractions, the band could have compressed Antichrist Superstar into a more powerful blast of evil."[14] Jim Farber of Entertainment Weekly commented "With Antichrist Superstar, Manson offers a combination vintage concept record and cheesy exploitation flick [...] to match his antisocial outbursts, Manson offers grinding metal guitars and death-rattle bass lines, letting his own deformed screech serve as the poison cherry on top [...] At least Manson's high-concept depravity has its own sick charm."[15] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic commented, "Though the sonic details make Antichrist Superstar an intriguing listen, it's not as extreme as it could have been—in particular, the guitars are surprisingly anemic, sounding like buzzing vacuums instead of unwieldy chainsaws. Even with that considered, [It] is an unexpectedly cohesive album and will stand as Marilyn Manson's definitive statement.".[16]
Commercial performance[edit]
The album debuted at number three on the Billboard 200. According to Soundscan, the record moved 132,000 units in its first week.[17] The album has sold over 7 million copies worldwide.[3]
Accolades[edit]
According to AcclaimedMusic.net Antichrist Superstar is the 14th best album of 1996,[18] the 180th greatest record released during the 1990s[19] and the 973rd greatest of all-time.[19] In 2001 Q named Antichrist Superstar as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time.[20] In 2006, sister British magazines Classic Rock and Metal Hammer included Antichrist Superstar in The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s.[21][22] Furthermore, in 2001, Classic Rock ranked the album 92nd in its 100 Greatest Rock Albums Ever.[22][23] The French edition of the British magazine Rock Sound ranked Antichrist Superstar 11th in their Top 150 Albums of Our Lifetime (1992–2006)[24] and 13th in their 1996 Albums of the Year.[22][25] Kerrang! ranks Antichrist Superstar 3rd in their 1996 list of Albums of the Year,[26] 14th on their 100 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die[27] and 88th in its 100 Greatest Rock Albums.[22][28] Dutch magazine Muziekkrant OOR ranked Antichrist Superstar 109th in their 1996 Albums of the Year list.[29] Rolling Stone listed Antichrist Superstar among its Essential Recordings Of The ‘90s in 1999[30] and ranked it 84th in their The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s[31] in 2010.[22] The record is also listed in the book Albums: 50 Years of Great Recordings.[22][32] British magazine Record Collector also list the album among their 10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century.[22][33] German magazine Visions considers the album 37th in its list of The Most Important Albums of the 90s.[22][34] The French FNAC ranks the record 606th in their The 1000 Best Albums of All Time.[22][35] Furthermore, the French music magazine Rock & Folk lists Antichrist Superstar among The Best Albums from 1963 to 1999.[22][36] In 2008, Consequence of Sound identified Antichrist Superstar as a modern classic in their "Dusting ‘Em Off" feature due to its counter-cultural and social impact during the late 90's.[37] The album is also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[38]


Publication
Country
Accolade
Year
Rank
AcclaimedMusic.net United States Greatest Records Of All Time[39] 1996 973
Q United Kingdom Top 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time[40] 2001 *
Classic Rock United Kingdom The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s[41] 2006 *
Metal Hammer United Kingdom The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s[41] 2006 *
Rock Sound France Albums of the Year[42] 1996 13th
Kerrang! United Kingdom 100 Greatest Rock Albums[43] 2006 88th
Muziekkrant OOR Netherland Albums of the Year[43] 1996 109th
Rolling Stone United States The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s[43] 2000 84th
Record Collector United Kingdom 10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century[43] 2000 *
Visions German The Most Important Albums of the 90s[22][34] 2000 37th
FNAC France The 1000 Best Albums of All Time[22][35] 2011 606th
Rock & Folk France The Best Albums from 1963 to 1999[43] 2000 *
Esli Jacinte United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (The top 150 Albums of the Generation)[44] 2006 *
Dead to the World Tour[edit]
Main article: Dead to the World Tour
Following the release of Antichrist Superstar, Marilyn Manson staged a worldwide stadium tour, titled the Dead to the World Tour. Beginning on September 5, 1996 and lasting until September 16, 1997, the tour included eight legs spanning Europe, Japan, Oceania, Hawaii, North America and South America with a total of 175 shows.
A concert film was recorded to depict the tour, titled Dead to the World, and released on February 10, 1998 in VHS format by Interscope Records.[45] It features live concert footage of 11 songs culled from performances across the world.[45] "Apple of Sodom", "My Monkey", "Rock 'n' Roll Nigger" and a selection of songs from Antichrist Superstar are on the release.[45]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson, except "Irresponsible Hate Anthem" co-written with Ramirez[46].

Cycle I: The Heirophant

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Irresponsible Hate Anthem"   Berkowitz, Gacy 4:17
2. "The Beautiful People"   Manson, Ramirez 3:38
3. "Dried Up, Tied and Dead to the World"   Manson, Ramirez 4:16
4. "Tourniquet"   Berkowitz, Ramirez 4:29

Cycle II: Inauguration of the Worm

No.
Title
Music
Length

5. "Little Horn"   Ramirez, Reznor 2:43
6. "Cryptorchid"   Gacy 2:44
7. "Deformography"   Ramirez, Reznor 4:31
8. "Wormboy"   Berkowitz, Ramirez 3:56
9. "Mister Superstar"   Ramirez 5:04
10. "Angel with the Scabbed Wings"   Manson, Ramirez, Gacy 3:52
11. "Kinderfeld"   Ramirez, Gacy 4:51

Cycle III: Disintegrator Rising

No.
Title
Music
Length

12. "Antichrist Superstar"   Ramirez, Gacy 5:14
13. "1996"   Ramirez 4:01
14. "Minute of Decay"   Manson 4:44
15. "The Reflecting God"   Ramirez, Reznor 5:36
16. "Man That You Fear"   Ramirez, Manson, Gacy, Berkowitz 6:10
99. "Track 99" (hidden track) Gacy, Ramirez 1:39
NotesWhile consisting of three cycles, the album was released as a single disc, similar to the four cycles of 2000's Holy Wood.
There are different names for the hidden track, "Empty Sounds of Hate". . The Marilyn Manson Collection on iTunes titles it "Ghost Track". Rhapsody titles the track as Track 99.
Outtakes[edit]
Long Hard Road Out of Hell – appears on the 1997 Spawn soundtrack; also released on the "Man That You Fear" promotional single
The Suck For Your Solution – appears on the Howard Stern: Private Parts soundtrack
Apple of Sodom – appears on the Lost Highway soundtrack
Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes – unreleased, a later recording from the Mechanical Animals sessions, with updated lyrics and a different arrangement, was released on the Celebrity Deathmatch soundtrack as well as the live album The Last Tour on Earth.
Charts and certifications[edit]



Album[edit]

Chart (1996)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[47] 41
Austria (Ö3)[47] 37
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[47] 13
France (SNEP)[47][48] 116
Germany (Media Control)[49] 100
Hungary (Mahasz)[50] 21
New Zealand (RIANZ)[47] 5
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[47] 50
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 73
United States (Billboard 200)[52][53] 3

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Argentina CAPIF Gold[54] 20,000+ —
Australia ARIA Gold[55] 35,000+ —
Canada CRIA 2× Platinum[56] 200,000+ —
New Zealand RIANZ Platinum[57] 15,000+ —
Mexico AMPROFON Gold[58] 100,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[59] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Platinum[60] 1,000,000+ 1,900,000[4]

Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (1996)
Peak
 position
"The Beautiful People" Australia (ARIA)[61] 42
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[61] 96
New Zealand (RIANZ)[61] 29
Modern Rock Tracks[62][63] 26
Mainstream Rock Tracks[62] 29
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 18

Single
Chart (1996–1997)
Peak
 position
"Tourniquet" Finland (Mitä Hitti)[64] 16
New Zealand (RIANZ)[64] 41
Mainstream Rock Tracks[63] 30
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 28

Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[65]Marilyn Manson – vocals, guitar and pan flute
Daisy Berkowitz – lead and rhythm guitar
Twiggy Ramirez – lead and rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar, bass
Madonna Wayne Gacy – all keyboards, loops, and other original pieces of 16-bit audio information
Ginger Fish – drums, programming
Zim Zum – live guitar on the tour for Antichrist Superstar

Production[65]Sean Beavan – producer, engineer, editing, mixing, guitar (2), guitar synthesizer
Trent Reznor – producer, editing, mixing, mellotron (6), guitar (7,9) rhodes piano (16)
Robin Finck – guitar
Danny Lohner – guitar (10,15)
Chris Vrenna – drums (11), programming, engineer, editing
Dave Ogilvie – producer, programming, engineer, editing, mixing
P. R. Brown – digital illustration, design
Dean Karr – photography

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/antichrist-superstar-mw0000188724
2.Jump up ^ Lanham, Tom (November 2000). "Marilyn Manson: Absinthe Makes The Heart Grow Fonder". Alternative Press (Alternative Press Magazine, Inc.) (#148): 76‐86.
3.^ Jump up to: a b San Roman, Gabriel (2011-10-07). "Marilyn Manson's 'Antichrist Superstar' Turns 15 as 'Born Villain' Readies for Release". OC Weekly. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
4.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson: Antichrist indie star". Reuters. November 8, 2010. Retrieved 2011-01-18.
5.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/artist/marilyn-manson-p45021/charts-awards
6.^ Jump up to: a b Thigpen, David (1997-02-24). "Music: Satan's Little Helpers". TIME Magazine. Retrieved 2010-12-09.
7.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Marilyn Manson Unveils Tour Plans, First Single For Holy Wood". MTV News (latterly VH1). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
8.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/r241643
9.Jump up ^ http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,294525,00.html
10.Jump up ^ http://www.robertchristgau.com/get_artist.php?name=marilyn+manson
11.Jump up ^ Spin (12/96, p.140) - 8 (out of 10) - "...Its 16 songs rock like '70s Sabbath-style metal, but harder; the arrangements echo Queen in operatic scope but are more intense; the mood owes its vampiric chill to Bauhaus, but this band actually bites the vein..."
12.Jump up ^ http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/antichrist-superstar-19961029/
13.Jump up ^ "Blankman Inc Interviews Scott Mitchell Putesky ( Daisy Berkowitz )".
14.Jump up ^ Ali, Lorraine (1996-10-29). "Antichrist Superstar Rolling Stone review". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
15.Jump up ^ Farber, Jim (1996-10-11). "Antichrist Superstar Entertainment Weekly review". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
16.Jump up ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (October 1996). "Antichrist Superstar allmusic review". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
17.Jump up ^ Dansby, Andrew (2003-05-21). "Manson Golden at Number One". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
18.Jump up ^ "The Top Albums from 1996". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
19.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Artist Rank". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
20.Jump up ^ "Q Magazine 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time". Q Magazine. Archived from the original on November 11, 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
21.Jump up ^ "The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s". Classic Rock & Metal Hammer. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
22.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l "Antichrist Superstar All Music Guide Info and Review". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
23.Jump up ^ "Classic Rock (Christmas 2001) – 100 Greatest Rock Albums Ever". Classic Rock & Metal Hammer. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
24.Jump up ^ "Top 150 Albums of Our Lifetime". Rock Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
25.Jump up ^ "Choix des critiques depuis 1993". Rock Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
26.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! Albums Of The Year 1996". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
27.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! 100 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
28.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! 100 Greatest Rock Albums". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
29.Jump up ^ "Jaarlijst Oor 1996". Muziekkrant OOR. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
30.Jump up ^ of the ‘90s "Rolling Stone Essential Recordings Of The ‘90s". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
31.Jump up ^ "Rolling Stone The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
32.Jump up ^ "Albums: 50 Years of Great Recordings". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
33.Jump up ^ "10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century" (#245). Record Collector. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
34.^ Jump up to: a b "Die 100 wichtigsten Platten der Neunziger". Visions. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
35.^ Jump up to: a b "Les 1000 CD des disquaires de la fnac". FNAC (latterly Listology). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
36.Jump up ^ "Choix des critiques ou des lecteurs depuis 1993". Rock & Folk. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
37.Jump up ^ Buchanan, David (2008-09-13). "Dusting ‘Em Off: Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
38.Jump up ^ "1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (2008 edition)". Rocklist.net. Archived from the original on October 26, 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-20.
39.Jump up ^ "Pazz & Jop Critics Poll of 2001". The Village Voice. Retrieved 2007-11-04.
40.Jump up ^ "Classic Rock – The 100 Greatest Rock Albums of All-Time". Retrieved 2007-11-04.
41.^ Jump up to: a b "The Definitive 200". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
42.Jump up ^ Dimery, Robert (February 7, 2006). "1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.". Universe. New York, NY (ISBN 0-7893-1371-5). p. 910.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "A Selection of Lists from Record Collector Magazine". Rocklist.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
44.Jump up ^ "Les 150 Albums De La Génération". Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
45.^ Jump up to: a b c "Dead to the World". Interscope Records. Retrieved 2011-04-19.
46.Jump up ^ "Antichrist Superstar". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-18.
47.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar (Album)". Irish-Charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
48.Jump up ^ "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar (Album)". αCharts.us. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
49.Jump up ^ "Chartverfolgung / Marilyn Manson / Longplay". PhonoNet. Retrieved 2009-03-23.
50.Jump up ^ "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
51.^ Jump up to: a b c Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M – My Vitriol". Zobbel. Retrieved 2010-12-14.
52.Jump up ^ Billboard 200 and Canadian Albums charting. billboard.com. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
53.Jump up ^ allmusic Billboard charts & awards. allmusic Retrieved 2010-11-17.
54.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson in Argentinian Charts". Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers.
55.Jump up ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 1997 Albums" Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 5, 2011.
56.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson" Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 6, 2011.
57.Jump up ^ "NZ Top 50 Albums Chart, 7 June 1998". Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Retrieved May 13, 2015.
58.Jump up ^ "Certificaciones". Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas.
59.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
60.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Antichrist Superstar" Recording Industry Association of America. Access date: March 5, 2011.
61.^ Jump up to: a b c "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Beautiful People (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
62.^ Jump up to: a b Alternative Songs charting. billboard.com. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
63.^ Jump up to: a b allmusic Billboard Singles charts & awards. allmusic Retrieved 2010-11-17.
64.^ Jump up to: a b "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Tourniquet (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
65.^ Jump up to: a b "Antichrist Superstar credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.
External links[edit]
Antichrist Superstar at Interscope Records
Music Emissions – Antichrist Superstar


[hide]
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Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
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 P. R. Brown ·
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 E. Elias Merhige ·
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 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
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Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
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   ·
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 List-Class article Concert tours
 

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Categories: 1996 albums
Albums certified double platinum by the Canadian Recording Industry Association
Albums certified gold by the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers
Albums certified gold by the Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas
Albums certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America
Albums produced by Sean Beavan
Albums produced by Trent Reznor
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Antichrist Superstar

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Antichrist Superstar

Studio album by Marilyn Manson

Released
October 8, 1996
Recorded
February 1996–August 1996 at Nothing Studios, New Orleans
Genre
Industrial metal, alternative metal, heavy metal, industrial rock, experimental[1]
Length
77:26
Label
Nothing, Interscope
Producer
Trent Reznor, Dave Ogilvie, Marilyn Manson, Sean Beavan
Marilyn Manson chronology

Smells Like Children
 (1995) Antichrist Superstar
 (1996) Remix & Repent
 (1997)


Singles from Antichrist Superstar
1."Antichrist Superstar"
 Released: 1996 (promotional)
2."The Beautiful People"
 Released: September 22, 1996
3."Tourniquet"
 Released: September 8, 1997
4."Man That You Fear"
 Released: 1997 (promotional)

Antichrist Superstar is the second full-length studio album by American rock band Marilyn Manson. It was released on October 8, 1996 in the US through Nothing and Interscope Records. The record's success in mainstream charts turned the band overnight into a household name and its frontman into a bona fide rock icon. This led to numerous protests from religious and civic groups such as the American Family Association due to the band's perceived anti-Christian stance as well as the transgressive and confrontational nature of their music, performance and appearance.
A rock opera concept album, it is the first installment in a trilogy which includes Mechanical Animals and Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death). After the release of Holy Wood, Manson said that the overarching story within the trilogy is presented in reverse chronological order; Antichrist Superstar, therefore, is the finale despite being the first to be chronologically released.[2] It was recorded at Nothing Studios in New Orleans and produced by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
The album has sold over 7 million copies worldwide,[3] with 1.9 million of those sold in the United States alone.[4] It spawned two commercial singles ("The Beautiful People" and "Tourniquet"), and an autobiography (The Long Hard Road Out of Hell). The band supported the album with the controversial Dead to the World Tour. The album debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200.[5]


Contents  [hide]
1 Background
2 Packaging
3 Singles and music videos
4 Reception 4.1 Critical reception
4.2 Commercial performance
4.3 Accolades
5 Dead to the World Tour
6 Track listing 6.1 Outtakes
7 Charts and certifications 7.1 Album
7.2 Certifications
7.3 Singles
8 Credits and personnel
9 References
10 External links

Background[edit]
The album's title is a takeoff on Andrew Lloyd Webber's 1971 musical Jesus Christ Superstar.[6] Similarly, the record is a rock opera[6] which, in an issue of Kerrang! magazine edited by the band's frontman, is stated as a tribute to—and inspired by—the works of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche.
After the release of Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), Marilyn Manson divulged that his concept album trilogy is an autobiographical story told in a reverse timeline (chronologically reverse from their actual release dates). That means Holy Wood opens the storyline followed by Mechanical Animals and concludes with Antichrist Superstar.[7] Furthermore, though Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals made sense as individual concept albums on their own, there was a hidden overarching story running through the three releases.
Packaging[edit]
Antichrist Superstar has elaborate packaging, consisting of a black cardstock sleeve covering the plastic jewel case with graphics of Manson on both the front and back, the latter of which is flanked by the red Superstar Shock logo and the Roman numerals IX, VI, III and VII. The booklet contains pictures of the band, a visual worm-to-angel metamorphosis, medical diagrams, printed lyrics to each song, and liner notes including traditional thanks and credits as well as a curious entry found under the lyrics to the song "Irresponsible Hate Anthem", stating it was recorded live on February 14, 1997, despite the album being released well before that in October 1996.
Also, found on the front of the album cover is a circle surrounded by the words Heart, Mind, Complacent, and Malice. If one folds the booklet just right they can also find the hidden words Heart, Mind, Complacent, and Malice made up of folding the words Heaven/Comfort, Minister/Fiend, Complaisant/Magnificent and Master/Lice respectively. The booklet also makes reference to Revelation chapter twelve, verses one to five, in the Bible.
The album, despite containing a gap of silence a few minutes long, is cyclical, as both opening and closing seconds include the distorted phrase "When you are suffering, know that I have betrayed you." When the album is placed on loop, the pacing between the sentences matches that of the additional distorted recitation found in the preceding hidden track. The names of the two latter cycles seem to be a reference to two films by avant-garde filmmaker Kenneth Anger: Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome and Lucifer Rising.
Singles and music videos[edit]




"Cryptorchid"








Problems playing this file? See media help.
"The Beautiful People" is the first single of Antichrist Superstar. The video was released on September 22, 1996 and directed by Canadian director and photographer Floria Sigismondi. According to Manson, the title "The Beautiful People" was inspired by a book that came out in the mid-1960s by Marilyn Bender. This book contains information on the life of the Kennedy family, politics, fashion and culture. Moreover, the single was awarded gold record certification by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), reached number twenty-six in the US Billboard and number eighteen in the UK. The music channel VH1 named this single twenty-eight of their 40 Greatest Metal Songs.
"Tourniquet" is the second single from the album. It was released on September 8, 1997 and was also directed by Floria Sigismondi. In the video Manson is a humanoid moving through a wheel. The band uses a variety of bizarre costumes for each scene. This is one of three music videos where Manson appears without makeup, the other two videos are "Get Your Gunn" and "Lunchbox".
"Cryptorchid" is the third video from the album. The video was directed by E. Elias Merhige and displays images from his 1991 experimental film Begotten. Some scenes were replaced by Manson to avoid the original publications of the tape.
"Antichrist Superstar" was released as the fourth video. The video was also directed by E. Elias Merhige and depicts Manson on a podium bearing a lightning bolt symbol. In one scene, Manson tears apart the Bible, dumping it on the public. Before its planned launch, the video was screened at the 1997 San Francisco Film Festival, however, Interscope Records was appalled by its content and prevented its release. In 2010, the unedited video of "Antichrist Superstar" was leaked on YouTube.
"Man That You Fear" was the last video from Antichrist Superstar. The music video was directed by W.I.Z. and adapted from the Shirley Jackson short story The Lottery. The video also contains aesthetic and symbolic references to the 1973 film The Wicker Man and the 1989 Alejandro Jodorowsky film Santa Sangre.
Reception[edit]
Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating
AllMusic 4.5/5 stars[8]
Entertainment Weekly B[9]
Robert Christgau (dud)[10]
Spin 8/10[11]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[12]



"Too many tracks over all – the better songs didn’t shine through all the bluster. An interesting parallel to the band line-up/musicians working on the album. It’s a great record but the (lyrical/literal) writing could have been so much stronger."
—Daisy Berkowitz in 2012[13]
The album received generally positive reviews by critics. Lorraine Ali of Rolling Stone commented "The rise of Marilyn Manson marks the end of the reign of punk realism in rock & roll [...] The layered effect of the music recalls that of Ministry, but Marilyn Manson's execution is not as dense. Instead, Antichrist Superstar writhes with a cool, sinister and taunting feel [...] before lurching out from the shadows with hammering percussion and static-loaded feedback [...] For all of the album's attractions, the band could have compressed Antichrist Superstar into a more powerful blast of evil."[14] Jim Farber of Entertainment Weekly commented "With Antichrist Superstar, Manson offers a combination vintage concept record and cheesy exploitation flick [...] to match his antisocial outbursts, Manson offers grinding metal guitars and death-rattle bass lines, letting his own deformed screech serve as the poison cherry on top [...] At least Manson's high-concept depravity has its own sick charm."[15] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic commented, "Though the sonic details make Antichrist Superstar an intriguing listen, it's not as extreme as it could have been—in particular, the guitars are surprisingly anemic, sounding like buzzing vacuums instead of unwieldy chainsaws. Even with that considered, [It] is an unexpectedly cohesive album and will stand as Marilyn Manson's definitive statement.".[16]
Commercial performance[edit]
The album debuted at number three on the Billboard 200. According to Soundscan, the record moved 132,000 units in its first week.[17] The album has sold over 7 million copies worldwide.[3]
Accolades[edit]
According to AcclaimedMusic.net Antichrist Superstar is the 14th best album of 1996,[18] the 180th greatest record released during the 1990s[19] and the 973rd greatest of all-time.[19] In 2001 Q named Antichrist Superstar as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time.[20] In 2006, sister British magazines Classic Rock and Metal Hammer included Antichrist Superstar in The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s.[21][22] Furthermore, in 2001, Classic Rock ranked the album 92nd in its 100 Greatest Rock Albums Ever.[22][23] The French edition of the British magazine Rock Sound ranked Antichrist Superstar 11th in their Top 150 Albums of Our Lifetime (1992–2006)[24] and 13th in their 1996 Albums of the Year.[22][25] Kerrang! ranks Antichrist Superstar 3rd in their 1996 list of Albums of the Year,[26] 14th on their 100 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die[27] and 88th in its 100 Greatest Rock Albums.[22][28] Dutch magazine Muziekkrant OOR ranked Antichrist Superstar 109th in their 1996 Albums of the Year list.[29] Rolling Stone listed Antichrist Superstar among its Essential Recordings Of The ‘90s in 1999[30] and ranked it 84th in their The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s[31] in 2010.[22] The record is also listed in the book Albums: 50 Years of Great Recordings.[22][32] British magazine Record Collector also list the album among their 10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century.[22][33] German magazine Visions considers the album 37th in its list of The Most Important Albums of the 90s.[22][34] The French FNAC ranks the record 606th in their The 1000 Best Albums of All Time.[22][35] Furthermore, the French music magazine Rock & Folk lists Antichrist Superstar among The Best Albums from 1963 to 1999.[22][36] In 2008, Consequence of Sound identified Antichrist Superstar as a modern classic in their "Dusting ‘Em Off" feature due to its counter-cultural and social impact during the late 90's.[37] The album is also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[38]


Publication
Country
Accolade
Year
Rank
AcclaimedMusic.net United States Greatest Records Of All Time[39] 1996 973
Q United Kingdom Top 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time[40] 2001 *
Classic Rock United Kingdom The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s[41] 2006 *
Metal Hammer United Kingdom The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s[41] 2006 *
Rock Sound France Albums of the Year[42] 1996 13th
Kerrang! United Kingdom 100 Greatest Rock Albums[43] 2006 88th
Muziekkrant OOR Netherland Albums of the Year[43] 1996 109th
Rolling Stone United States The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s[43] 2000 84th
Record Collector United Kingdom 10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century[43] 2000 *
Visions German The Most Important Albums of the 90s[22][34] 2000 37th
FNAC France The 1000 Best Albums of All Time[22][35] 2011 606th
Rock & Folk France The Best Albums from 1963 to 1999[43] 2000 *
Esli Jacinte United States 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (The top 150 Albums of the Generation)[44] 2006 *
Dead to the World Tour[edit]
Main article: Dead to the World Tour
Following the release of Antichrist Superstar, Marilyn Manson staged a worldwide stadium tour, titled the Dead to the World Tour. Beginning on September 5, 1996 and lasting until September 16, 1997, the tour included eight legs spanning Europe, Japan, Oceania, Hawaii, North America and South America with a total of 175 shows.
A concert film was recorded to depict the tour, titled Dead to the World, and released on February 10, 1998 in VHS format by Interscope Records.[45] It features live concert footage of 11 songs culled from performances across the world.[45] "Apple of Sodom", "My Monkey", "Rock 'n' Roll Nigger" and a selection of songs from Antichrist Superstar are on the release.[45]
Track listing[edit]
All lyrics written by Manson, except "Irresponsible Hate Anthem" co-written with Ramirez[46].

Cycle I: The Heirophant

No.
Title
Music
Length

1. "Irresponsible Hate Anthem"   Berkowitz, Gacy 4:17
2. "The Beautiful People"   Manson, Ramirez 3:38
3. "Dried Up, Tied and Dead to the World"   Manson, Ramirez 4:16
4. "Tourniquet"   Berkowitz, Ramirez 4:29

Cycle II: Inauguration of the Worm

No.
Title
Music
Length

5. "Little Horn"   Ramirez, Reznor 2:43
6. "Cryptorchid"   Gacy 2:44
7. "Deformography"   Ramirez, Reznor 4:31
8. "Wormboy"   Berkowitz, Ramirez 3:56
9. "Mister Superstar"   Ramirez 5:04
10. "Angel with the Scabbed Wings"   Manson, Ramirez, Gacy 3:52
11. "Kinderfeld"   Ramirez, Gacy 4:51

Cycle III: Disintegrator Rising

No.
Title
Music
Length

12. "Antichrist Superstar"   Ramirez, Gacy 5:14
13. "1996"   Ramirez 4:01
14. "Minute of Decay"   Manson 4:44
15. "The Reflecting God"   Ramirez, Reznor 5:36
16. "Man That You Fear"   Ramirez, Manson, Gacy, Berkowitz 6:10
99. "Track 99" (hidden track) Gacy, Ramirez 1:39
NotesWhile consisting of three cycles, the album was released as a single disc, similar to the four cycles of 2000's Holy Wood.
There are different names for the hidden track, "Empty Sounds of Hate". . The Marilyn Manson Collection on iTunes titles it "Ghost Track". Rhapsody titles the track as Track 99.
Outtakes[edit]
Long Hard Road Out of Hell – appears on the 1997 Spawn soundtrack; also released on the "Man That You Fear" promotional single
The Suck For Your Solution – appears on the Howard Stern: Private Parts soundtrack
Apple of Sodom – appears on the Lost Highway soundtrack
Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes – unreleased, a later recording from the Mechanical Animals sessions, with updated lyrics and a different arrangement, was released on the Celebrity Deathmatch soundtrack as well as the live album The Last Tour on Earth.
Charts and certifications[edit]



Album[edit]

Chart (1996)
Peak
 position

Australia (ARIA)[47] 41
Austria (Ö3)[47] 37
Finland (Mitä Hitti)[47] 13
France (SNEP)[47][48] 116
Germany (Media Control)[49] 100
Hungary (Mahasz)[50] 21
New Zealand (RIANZ)[47] 5
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[47] 50
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 73
United States (Billboard 200)[52][53] 3

Certifications[edit]

Region
Provider
Certification
Shipment
Actual Sales
Argentina CAPIF Gold[54] 20,000+ —
Australia ARIA Gold[55] 35,000+ —
Canada CRIA 2× Platinum[56] 200,000+ —
New Zealand RIANZ Platinum[57] 15,000+ —
Mexico AMPROFON Gold[58] 100,000+ —
United Kingdom BPI Gold[59] 100,000+ —
United States RIAA Platinum[60] 1,000,000+ 1,900,000[4]

Singles[edit]


Single
Chart (1996)
Peak
 position
"The Beautiful People" Australia (ARIA)[61] 42
Netherlands (MegaCharts)[61] 96
New Zealand (RIANZ)[61] 29
Modern Rock Tracks[62][63] 26
Mainstream Rock Tracks[62] 29
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 18

Single
Chart (1996–1997)
Peak
 position
"Tourniquet" Finland (Mitä Hitti)[64] 16
New Zealand (RIANZ)[64] 41
Mainstream Rock Tracks[63] 30
United Kingdom (OCC)[51] 28

Credits and personnel[edit]


Marilyn Manson[65]Marilyn Manson – vocals, guitar and pan flute
Daisy Berkowitz – lead and rhythm guitar
Twiggy Ramirez – lead and rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar, bass
Madonna Wayne Gacy – all keyboards, loops, and other original pieces of 16-bit audio information
Ginger Fish – drums, programming
Zim Zum – live guitar on the tour for Antichrist Superstar

Production[65]Sean Beavan – producer, engineer, editing, mixing, guitar (2), guitar synthesizer
Trent Reznor – producer, editing, mixing, mellotron (6), guitar (7,9) rhodes piano (16)
Robin Finck – guitar
Danny Lohner – guitar (10,15)
Chris Vrenna – drums (11), programming, engineer, editing
Dave Ogilvie – producer, programming, engineer, editing, mixing
P. R. Brown – digital illustration, design
Dean Karr – photography

References[edit]
Footnotes
1.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/antichrist-superstar-mw0000188724
2.Jump up ^ Lanham, Tom (November 2000). "Marilyn Manson: Absinthe Makes The Heart Grow Fonder". Alternative Press (Alternative Press Magazine, Inc.) (#148): 76‐86.
3.^ Jump up to: a b San Roman, Gabriel (2011-10-07). "Marilyn Manson's 'Antichrist Superstar' Turns 15 as 'Born Villain' Readies for Release". OC Weekly. Retrieved 2011-12-08.
4.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson: Antichrist indie star". Reuters. November 8, 2010. Retrieved 2011-01-18.
5.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/artist/marilyn-manson-p45021/charts-awards
6.^ Jump up to: a b Thigpen, David (1997-02-24). "Music: Satan's Little Helpers". TIME Magazine. Retrieved 2010-12-09.
7.Jump up ^ Saidman, Sorelle (2000-09-18). "Marilyn Manson Unveils Tour Plans, First Single For Holy Wood". MTV News (latterly VH1). Retrieved 2010-11-16.
8.Jump up ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/r241643
9.Jump up ^ http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,294525,00.html
10.Jump up ^ http://www.robertchristgau.com/get_artist.php?name=marilyn+manson
11.Jump up ^ Spin (12/96, p.140) - 8 (out of 10) - "...Its 16 songs rock like '70s Sabbath-style metal, but harder; the arrangements echo Queen in operatic scope but are more intense; the mood owes its vampiric chill to Bauhaus, but this band actually bites the vein..."
12.Jump up ^ http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/antichrist-superstar-19961029/
13.Jump up ^ "Blankman Inc Interviews Scott Mitchell Putesky ( Daisy Berkowitz )".
14.Jump up ^ Ali, Lorraine (1996-10-29). "Antichrist Superstar Rolling Stone review". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
15.Jump up ^ Farber, Jim (1996-10-11). "Antichrist Superstar Entertainment Weekly review". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
16.Jump up ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (October 1996). "Antichrist Superstar allmusic review". allmusic. Retrieved 2011-01-29.
17.Jump up ^ Dansby, Andrew (2003-05-21). "Manson Golden at Number One". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
18.Jump up ^ "The Top Albums from 1996". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
19.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson Artist Rank". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
20.Jump up ^ "Q Magazine 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time". Q Magazine. Archived from the original on November 11, 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-22.
21.Jump up ^ "The 200 Greatest Albums of the 90s". Classic Rock & Metal Hammer. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
22.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l "Antichrist Superstar All Music Guide Info and Review". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
23.Jump up ^ "Classic Rock (Christmas 2001) – 100 Greatest Rock Albums Ever". Classic Rock & Metal Hammer. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
24.Jump up ^ "Top 150 Albums of Our Lifetime". Rock Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
25.Jump up ^ "Choix des critiques depuis 1993". Rock Sound. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
26.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! Albums Of The Year 1996". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
27.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! 100 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
28.Jump up ^ "Kerrang! 100 Greatest Rock Albums". Kerrang!. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
29.Jump up ^ "Jaarlijst Oor 1996". Muziekkrant OOR. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
30.Jump up ^ of the ‘90s "Rolling Stone Essential Recordings Of The ‘90s". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
31.Jump up ^ "Rolling Stone The 100 Greatest Albums of the 90s". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
32.Jump up ^ "Albums: 50 Years of Great Recordings". Acclaimedmusic.net. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
33.Jump up ^ "10 Classic Albums from 21 Genres for the 21st Century" (#245). Record Collector. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
34.^ Jump up to: a b "Die 100 wichtigsten Platten der Neunziger". Visions. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
35.^ Jump up to: a b "Les 1000 CD des disquaires de la fnac". FNAC (latterly Listology). Retrieved 2011-03-06.
36.Jump up ^ "Choix des critiques ou des lecteurs depuis 1993". Rock & Folk. Retrieved 2011-03-06.
37.Jump up ^ Buchanan, David (2008-09-13). "Dusting ‘Em Off: Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved 2010-11-08.
38.Jump up ^ "1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (2008 edition)". Rocklist.net. Archived from the original on October 26, 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-20.
39.Jump up ^ "Pazz & Jop Critics Poll of 2001". The Village Voice. Retrieved 2007-11-04.
40.Jump up ^ "Classic Rock – The 100 Greatest Rock Albums of All-Time". Retrieved 2007-11-04.
41.^ Jump up to: a b "The Definitive 200". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
42.Jump up ^ Dimery, Robert (February 7, 2006). "1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.". Universe. New York, NY (ISBN 0-7893-1371-5). p. 910.
43.^ Jump up to: a b c d e "A Selection of Lists from Record Collector Magazine". Rocklist.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
44.Jump up ^ "Les 150 Albums De La Génération". Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
45.^ Jump up to: a b c "Dead to the World". Interscope Records. Retrieved 2011-04-19.
46.Jump up ^ "Antichrist Superstar". Amazon. Retrieved 2010-11-18.
47.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar (Album)". Irish-Charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
48.Jump up ^ "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Antichrist Superstar (Album)". αCharts.us. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
49.Jump up ^ "Chartverfolgung / Marilyn Manson / Longplay". PhonoNet. Retrieved 2009-03-23.
50.Jump up ^ "Search for Marilyn Manson in the Artist field". Mahasz. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-01.
51.^ Jump up to: a b c Zywietz, Tobias. "Chart Log UK: M – My Vitriol". Zobbel. Retrieved 2010-12-14.
52.Jump up ^ Billboard 200 and Canadian Albums charting. billboard.com. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
53.Jump up ^ allmusic Billboard charts & awards. allmusic Retrieved 2010-11-17.
54.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson in Argentinian Charts". Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers.
55.Jump up ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 1997 Albums" Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 5, 2011.
56.Jump up ^ "CRIA Database Search for Marilyn Manson" Canadian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved on March 6, 2011.
57.Jump up ^ "NZ Top 50 Albums Chart, 7 June 1998". Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Retrieved May 13, 2015.
58.Jump up ^ "Certificaciones". Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas.
59.Jump up ^ "BPI - Statistics - Certified Awards - Search for Marilyn Manson". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 2013-10-07.
60.Jump up ^ "RIAA Database Search for Antichrist Superstar" Recording Industry Association of America. Access date: March 5, 2011.
61.^ Jump up to: a b c "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – The Beautiful People (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
62.^ Jump up to: a b Alternative Songs charting. billboard.com. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
63.^ Jump up to: a b allmusic Billboard Singles charts & awards. allmusic Retrieved 2010-11-17.
64.^ Jump up to: a b "International charting positions for Marilyn Manson – Tourniquet (Song)". Irish-charts. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
65.^ Jump up to: a b "Antichrist Superstar credits". allmusic. Retrieved 2010-11-17.
BibliographyManson, Marilyn; Strauss, Neil (February 14, 1998). The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks. ISBN 0-06-039258-4.
External links[edit]
Antichrist Superstar at Interscope Records
Music Emissions – Antichrist Superstar


[hide]
v ·
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Marilyn Manson


Marilyn Manson ·
 Twiggy Ramirez ·
 Paul Wiley ·
 Gil Sharone
 Zsa Zsa Speck ·
 Olivia Newton Bundy ·
 Gidget Gein ·
 Sara Lee Lucas ·
 Daisy Berkowitz ·
 Zim Zum ·
 John 5 ·
 Madonna Wayne Gacy ·
 Tim Sköld ·
 Ginger Fish ·
 Chris Vrenna ·
 Fred Sablan ·
 Tyler Bates
 Touring musicians: ·
 Mark Chaussee ·
 Rob Holliday ·
 Wes Borland ·
 Andy Gerold ·
 Jason Sutter ·
 Spencer Rollins
 

Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
 Antichrist Superstar ·
 Mechanical Animals ·
 Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) ·
 The Golden Age of Grotesque ·
 Eat Me, Drink Me ·
 The High End of Low ·
 Born Villain ·
 The Pale Emperor
 

EPs
Smells Like Children ·
 Remix & Repent ·
 The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix (Korean Tour Limited Edition)
 

Live albums
The Last Tour on Earth
 

Compilation albums
Lunch Boxes & Choklit Cows ·
 Lest We Forget ·
 Lost & Found
 

Singles


Commercial
"Get Your Gunn" ·
 "Lunchbox" ·
 "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" ·
 "The Beautiful People" ·
 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
 "Rock Is Dead" ·
 "Disposable Teens" ·
 "The Fight Song" ·
 "The Nobodies" ·
 "Tainted Love" ·
 "mOBSCENE" ·
 "This Is the New Shit" ·
 "Personal Jesus" ·
 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
 "Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)" ·
 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
Dead to the World ·
 God Is in the T.V. ·
 Guns, God and Government
 

Books
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell ·
 Holy Wood ·
 Genealogies of Pain ·
 Campaign
 

Films
Autopsy ·
 Doppelherz ·
 Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll ·
 Born Villain
 

Tours
Independent touring (The Spooky Kids) ·
 Portrait of an American Family Tour ·
 Smells Like Children Tour ·
 Dead to the World Tour ·
 Mechanical Animals Tour ·
 Beautiful Monsters Tour ·
 Rock Is Dead Tour ·
 Guns, God and Government Tour ·
 Grotesk Burlesk Tour ·
 Against All Gods Tour ·
 Rape of the World Tour ·
 The High End of Low Tour ·
 Hey, Cruel World... ·
 Twins of Evil Tour ·
 Masters of Madness Tour ·
 The Hell Not Hallelujah Tour ·
 The End Times Tour
 

Soundtracks
Lost Highway (OST) ·
 Dead Man on Campus (OST) ·
 Spawn (OST) ·
 Private Parts (OST) ·
 Not Another Teen Movie (OST) ·
 Resident Evil (score)
 

Related


People
Tyler Bates ·
 Sean Beavan ·
 Michael Beinhorn ·
 P. R. Brown ·
 Rudy Coby ·
 Johnny Depp ·
 Jean Paul Gaultier ·
 Bon Harris ·
 Gottfried Helnwein ·
 Jessicka ·
 Shia LaBeouf ·
 David Lynch ·
 Rose McGowan ·
 E. Elias Merhige ·
 Roli Mosimann ·
 Perou ·
 Trent Reznor ·
 Dave Sardy ·
 Floria Sigismondi ·
 Neil Strauss ·
 Dita Von Teese ·
 Evan Rachel Wood
 

Bands
Amboog-a-Lard ·
 gODHEAD ·
 Goon Moon ·
 Jack Off Jill ·
 Loser ·
 Nine Inch Nails ·
 Rob Zombie
 

Articles
Discography ·
 The Manson Family Album ·
 MarilynManson.com ·
 Nothing Records ·
 Interscope Records ·
 Posthuman Records  (vanity label)
   ·
 Hell, etc. (vanity label) ·
 Cooking Vinyl
 


Lists
List-Class article Band members ·
 List-Class article Concert tours
 

Categories
Category Albums ·
 Category Audio samples ·
 Category Members ·
 Category Songs ·
 Category Tours
 

Wikipedia book Book ·
 Commons page Commons ·
 Portal Portal ·
 WikiProject WikiProject
 

  


Categories: 1996 albums
Albums certified double platinum by the Canadian Recording Industry Association
Albums certified gold by the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers
Albums certified gold by the Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas
Albums certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America
Albums produced by Sean Beavan
Albums produced by Trent Reznor
Concept albums
Interscope Records albums
Marilyn Manson (band) albums
Nothing Records albums
Albums produced by Marilyn Manson






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Marilyn Manson

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This article is about the person. For the band, see Marilyn Manson (band).

Marilyn Manson
Marilyn Manson.jpg
Manson performing in 2009

Background information

Birth name
Brian Hugh Warner
Born
January 5, 1969 (age 46)
Canton, Ohio, U.S.
Genres
Industrial metal, industrial rock, alternative metal, shock rock, electro-industrial, gothic rock, heavy metal, glam rock, hard rock
Occupation(s)
Singer-songwriter, musician, poet, actor, painter
Instruments
Vocals
Years active
1989–present
Labels
Nothing, Hell, etc., Cooking Vinyl, Loma Vista Recordings
Associated acts
Marilyn Manson (band), Nine Inch Nails, Godhead, Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Zombie, Mrs. Scabtree, Jack Off Jill, Trent Reznor, Alice Cooper, Rammstein, Avril Lavigne
Brian Hugh Warner (born January 5, 1969), known professionally as Marilyn Manson, is an American musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actor, painter, multimedia artist, and former music journalist. He is known for his controversial stage personality and image as the eponymous lead singer of the band Marilyn Manson, which he co-founded with Daisy Berkowitz and of which he remains the only constant member. His stage name was formed by juxtaposing the names of two American cultural icons, namely actress Marilyn Monroe and murderer Charles Manson.[1][2][3]
He is best known for his band's records released in the 1990s, most notably Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals, which along with his public image earned him a reputation in the mainstream media as a controversial figure and a negative influence on young people.[4][5] In the U.S. alone, three of the band's albums have been awarded platinum and three more went gold, and the band has had eight releases debut in the top ten, including two number-one albums. Manson has been ranked number 44 in the Top 100 Heavy Metal Vocalists by Hit Parader, and has been nominated for four Grammy Awards.
Manson made his film debut in 1997, as an actor in David Lynch's Lost Highway. Since then he has appeared in a variety of minor roles and cameos. He was interviewed in Michael Moore's political documentary Bowling for Columbine, discussing possible motivations for the 1999 Columbine massacre and allegations that his music was somehow a factor. On September 13–14, 2002, his first art show, The Golden Age of Grotesque, was held at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions center. Manson revealed a series of 20 paintings in 2010 entitled Genealogies of Pain, an exhibition showcased at Vienna's Kunsthalle gallery,[6] which the artist collaborated on with David Lynch.


Contents  [hide]
1 Early life and education
2 Career 2.1 Music
2.2 Film and television
2.3 Art
2.4 Video games
2.5 Other
3 Relationships
4 Lawsuits
5 Discography
6 Special features
7 Tours
8 Awards and nominations
9 Filmography
10 Books
11 References
12 External links

Early life and education[edit]
Manson was born in Canton, Ohio. He is the only son of Barbara Warner (née Wyer) and Hugh Warner.[7] Manson is of German and English descent.[7][8][9] In his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell, he detailed his grandfather's sexual fetishes, including bestiality and sadomasochism. As a child, he attended his mother's Episcopal church, though his father was a Catholic.[10][11] Warner attended Heritage Christian School from first grade to tenth grade. In that school, they tried to show children what music they were not supposed to listen to; Warner then fell in love with "what he wasn't supposed to do."[12] He later transferred to GlenOak High School and graduated from there in 1987. After relocating with his parents, he became a student at Broward Community College in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in 1990. He was working towards a degree in journalism and gaining experience in the field by writing articles for a music magazine, 25th Parallel. He soon met several of the musicians to whom his own band were later compared, including My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult, The Perfect, and Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
Career[edit]
Music[edit]
Main article: Marilyn Manson (band)
Manson and guitarist Scott Putesky formed Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids following conversations at the Reunion Room in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 1989.[13] The name was later shortened to Marilyn Manson. While with The Spooky Kids, Manson was involved with Jeordie White (also known as Twiggy Ramirez) and Stephen Gregory Bier Jr. (also known as Madonna Wayne Gacy) in two side-projects: Satan on Fire, a faux-Christian metal ensemble where he played bass guitar, and drums in Mrs. Scabtree, a collaborative band formed with White and then girlfriend Jessicka (vocalist with the band Jack Off Jill) as a way to combat contractual agreements that prohibited Marilyn Manson from playing in certain clubs. In 1993, the band drew the attention of Trent Reznor. Reznor produced their 1994 debut album, Portrait of an American Family and released it on his Nothing Records label. The band began to develop a cult following, which grew larger on the Downward Spiral Tour that featured Nine Inch Nails and Jim Rose Circus along with the release of Smells Like Children in 1995. That EP yielded the band's first big MTV hit with "Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)," a cover of the 1983 Eurythmics hit. Antichrist Superstar (co-produced by Trent Reznor) was an even greater success.[14]
In the U.S. alone, three of the band's albums have been awarded two platinum and three more went gold, and the band has had seven releases debut in the top ten, including two number-one albums. Manson first worked as a producer with the band Jack Off Jill. He helped name the band and produced most of the band's early recordings, and also played guitar on the song "My Cat" and had the band open most of his South Florida shows.[15] Manson later wrote the liner notes to the band's album Humid Teenage Mediocrity 1992–1996, a collection of early Jack Off Jill recordings. Manson has appeared as a guest performer on DMX's album Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood[16] and on Godhead's 2000 Years of Human Error album — the only album released on his vanity label Posthuman.[17][18] In 2011 it was revealed that Manson was to appear on the singer Skylar Grey's album "Invinsible" on the track entitled "Can't Haunt Me". Manson released his eighth studio album "Born Villain" in May 2012.
On November 10, 2014 Manson posted via his official Facebook page that his ninth studio album,The Pale Emperor, would be released on January 20, 2015.
Film and television[edit]



 Manson at the 2006 Festival de Cannes


 Manson in December 2007
Manson made his film debut in 1997, as an actor in David Lynch's Lost Highway. Since then he has appeared in a variety of minor roles and cameos, including Party Monster; then-girlfriend Rose McGowan's 1999 film Jawbreaker; Asia Argento's 2004 film The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things; Rise; The Hire: Beat The Devil, the sixth installment in the BMW Films series; and Showtime's comedy-drama TV series Californication in 2013, in which Manson portrayed himself. He also appeared on HBO's Eastbound & Down,[19] of which Manson is reportedly a longtime fan,[20] and had lobbied to appear on for years; and ABC's Once Upon a Time, for which he will provide the voice of the character "Shadow".
He was interviewed in Michael Moore's political documentary Bowling for Columbine discussing possible motivations for the Columbine massacre and allegations that his music was somehow a factor. He has appeared in animated form in Clone High and participated in several episodes of the MTV series Celebrity Deathmatch, becoming the show's unofficial champion and mascot; he often performed the voice for his claymated puppet, and contributed the song "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" to the soundtrack album. In July 2005, Manson told Rolling Stone that he was shifting his focus from music to filmmaking – "I just don't think the world is worth putting music into right now. I no longer want to make art that other people — particularly record companies — are turning into a product. I just want to make art."
Johnny Depp reportedly used Manson as his inspiration for his performance as Willy Wonka in the film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Manson himself expressed interest in playing the role of Willy Wonka in the film.[21][22][unreliable source?]
He had been working on his directorial debut, Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll, a project that has been in development hell since 2004, with Manson also set to portray the role of Lewis Carroll, author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Initially announced as a web-only release, it was later decided to give the estimated $4.2 million budget film a conventional cinema release, with a slated release date of mid-2007. The film was to have an original music soundtrack with previously unreleased songs.[23] Production of the film had been postponed indefinitely until after the Eat Me, Drink Me tour.[24] In 2010, studio bosses shut down production on the project, reportedly due to viewers' responses to the violent content of clips released on the internet. The film was later officially put on "indefinite production hold".[25] However, according to an interview with co-writer Anthony Silva about the hold, the film was still on and the talk of it being shut down was just a myth.[26] In a June 2013 interview, Manson stated that he had "resurrected" the project, and that Roger Avary would direct it.[27] In a separate interview during the previous year, he said a small crew similar to what he used for his Slo-Mo-Tion music video would be used, and would rather film the movie on an iPhone than not film it at all.
Manson appeared in the final season of the TV series, "Sons of Anarchy", as Ron Tully, a white supremacist.[28]
Art[edit]
Manson stated in a 2004 interview with i-D magazine to have begun his career as a watercolor painter in 1999 when he made five-minute concept pieces and sold them to drug dealers. On September 13–14, 2002, his first show, The Golden Age of Grotesque, was held at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions Centre. Art in America‍ '​s Max Henry likened them to the works of a "psychiatric patient given materials to use as therapy" and said his work would never be taken seriously in a fine art context, writing that the value was "in their celebrity, not the work".[29] On September 14–15, 2004, Manson held a second exhibition on the first night in Paris and the second in Berlin. The show was named 'Trismegistus' which was also the title of the center piece of the exhibit – a large, three-headed Christ painted onto an antique wood panel from a portable embalmers table.
Manson named his self-proclaimed art movement Celebritarian Corporation. He has coined a slogan for the movement: “We will sell our shadow to those who stand within it.” In 2005 he said that the Celebritarian Corporation has been "incubating for seven years" which if correct would indicate that Celebritarian Corporation, in some form, started in 1998.[30]
Celebritarian Corporation is also the namesake of an art gallery owned by Manson, called the Celebritarian Corporation Gallery of Fine Art in Los Angeles for which his third exhibition was the inaugural show. From April 2–17, 2007, his recent works were on show at the Space 39 Modern & Contemporary art gallery in Fort Myers, Florida. Forty pieces from this show traveled to Germany's Gallery Brigitte Schenk in Cologne to be publicly exhibited from June 28 – July 28, 2007. Manson was refused admittance to Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral), when he was in the city to attend the opening night. This was, according to Manson, because of his makeup.
Manson revealed a series of 20 paintings in 2010 entitled Genealogies of Pain, an exhibition showcased at Vienna's Kunsthalle gallery[6] which the artist collaborated on with David Lynch.
Video games[edit]
Manson made an appearance in the video game Area 51 as Edgar, a Grey Alien. His song "Cruci-Fiction in Space" is featured in a commercial for a video game, The Darkness. His likeness is also featured on the Celebrity Deathmatch video game for which he recorded a song for the soundtrack (2003). The song "Use Your Fist and Not Your Mouth" was the credits score of the game Cold Fear as well as Spawn: Armageddon. The song "Four Rusted Horses" had an alternate version used in trailers for the video game Fear 3. A remix of the song "Tainted Love" appears in the debut trailer for the game, Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit and in the launch trailer of Twisted Metal. Manson's song "The Beautiful People" was featured in WWE SmackDown! Shut Your Mouth, KickBeat and Brütal Legend. The song "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" is also featured in Saints Row: The Third. His music video to the song "Personal Jesus" was used in some parts of the Buzz! game series.



 Manson during the Mechanical Animals Tour.
Other[edit]
Manson launched "Mansinthe", his own brand of Swiss-made absinthe, which has received mixed reviews; some critics described the taste as being "just plain",[31] but it came second to Versinthe in an Absinthe top five[32] and won a gold medal at the 2008 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.[33] Other reviewers, such as critics at The Wormwood Society, have given the absinthe moderately high praise.[34]
In 2015, Manson stated he was no longer drinking absinthe. [35]
An energy drink called "Eat Me, Drink Me" was also produced for a limited time, inspired by Marilyn Manson's album of the same name.
Relationships[edit]
Manson was engaged to actress Rose McGowan from February 1998 to January 19, 2001.[36] McGowan later ended their two-year-long engagement over "lifestyle differences".
Manson and Dita Von Teese first met when he asked her to dance in one of his music videos. Though she was unable to, the two kept in contact. On his 32nd birthday, in 2001, she arrived with a bottle of absinthe and they became a couple. Manson proposed on March 22, 2004 and gave her a 1930s, 7-carat, European round-cut diamond engagement ring. On November 28, 2005, Manson and von Teese were married in a private, non-denominational ceremony in their home. A larger ceremony was held on December 3, at Gurteen Castle, in Kilsheelan, County Tipperary, Ireland, the home of their friend, Gottfried Helnwein. The wedding was officiated by the Chilean surrealist film director and comic book writer Alejandro Jodorowsky.[37] On December 30, 2006, Von Teese filed for divorce due to "irreconcilable differences."[38] ET.com and People claimed that Manson was having an extramarital affair with then 19-year-old actress Evan Rachel Wood, who co-starred in his horror film Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll, and was featured in the video for his 2007 single, "Heart-Shaped Glasses."[39][40] The relationship was confirmed by Von Teese in an interview with the Sunday Telegraph: "I wasn't supportive about his partying or his relationship with another girl, and as much as I loved him I wasn't going to be part of that."[41] Manson's alcohol abuse and distant behavior were also cited as cause for the split.[42] A judgment of divorce was entered in Los Angeles Superior Court on December 27, 2007.[43]
In 2007, attention was brought to Manson's love life again when a relationship with Evan Rachel Wood was made public.[44] Manson and Wood reportedly maintained an on-again off-again relationship for several years. Manson proposed to Wood during a Paris stage performance in January 2010, but the couple broke off the engagement later that year.[45]
In the March 2012 issue of Revolver magazine, American photographer Lindsay Usich was referred to as Manson's girlfriend. The article referenced a new painting by Manson featuring Usich. She is credited as the photo source for the cover art of Manson's 2012 album, Born Villain. It was later confirmed that the two were romantically involved.[46][47] In February 2015 Manson told Beat magazine that he is "newly single".[48]
Lawsuits[edit]
In September 1996, former bassist Gidget Gein negotiated a settlement with Manson where he would receive $17,500 in cash, 20 percent of any royalties paid for recordings and for any songs he had a hand in writing and his share of any other royalties or fees the group earned while he was a member. Furthermore, the settlement allowed him to market himself as a former member of Marilyn Manson. This settlement was not honored, however.[49]
Former guitarist and founding member Scott Putesky (aka Daisy Berkowitz) filed a $15 million lawsuit in a Fort Lauderdale court against the singer, the band and the band's attorney (David Codikow) in January 1998 after his forcible departure from the group in the spring of 1996. Berkowitz claimed he was cheated by the band out of "thousands of dollars in royalties, publishing rights, and performance fees." He also filed an attorney malpractice suit against Codikow, alleging that "Codikow represented Warner's interests more than the band's and that he gave Warner disproportionate control over the band's name, recordings, merchandising, and touring proceeds."[50][51] By October of that year, the suit had been settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.[52]
On November 30, 1998, a few days after the band accumulated "[a] total [of] more than $25,000" in backstage and hotel room damages during the Poughkeepsie, New York stop of their Mechanical Animals Tour,[53] SPIN editor Craig Marks filed a $24 million lawsuit against Manson and his bodyguards for allegedly assaulting his person and threatening to kill his family. According to Marks' interview with the New York Post, the issue stemmed from Manson's displeasure with the magazine's decision to renege on a promised cover story of the band for their January 1999 cover. According to Marks, the last-minute change was made because Manson's record wasn't "performing." The Post described the editor as "bruised and battered." Manson for his part issued a statement saying, "I had a conversation with Craig Marks expressing I was tired of Spin's immature business behavior and the series of deals they had broken with me. I told him that I didn't care what he prints or whether or not I'm on the cover. I simply no longer wanted to work with him or his magazine that obviously has a lack of respect for musicians and their fans."
On February 19, 1999, Manson counter-sued Marks for libel, slander and defamation. The singer was seeking $40 million in reparation, claiming that Marks' statements were false and "were made ... with actual malice, hatred and personal ill will." According to the counter-suit, Marks' allegations have "greatly damaged and injured [Manson's] reputation and standing in the music profession, in the music and entertainment industries, in his community and in the general public, and has been subjected to great shame, humiliation and indignity."[54] As for the Poughkeepsie incident, Manson apologized and offered to make financial restitution.[55][56]
In a civil battery suit, David Diaz, a security officer from a concert in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 27, 2000, sued for $75,000 in a Minneapolis federal court.[57] The federal court jury found in Manson's favor.[58]
In a civil suit presented by Oakland County, Michigan, Manson was charged with sexual misconduct against another security officer, Joshua Keasler, during a concert in Clarkston, Michigan, on July 30, 2001. Oakland County originally filed assault and battery and criminal sexual misconduct charges,[59] but the judge reduced the latter charge to misdemeanor disorderly conduct.[60] Manson pleaded no contest to the reduced charges, paid a $4,000 fine,[61] and later settled the lawsuit under undisclosed terms.[62]
On April 3, 2002, Maria St. John filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court accusing Manson of providing her adult daughter, Jennifer Syme, with cocaine and instructing her to drive while under the influence.[63] After attending a party at Manson's house, Syme was given a lift home;[64] Manson claims she was taken home by a designated driver.[63] After she got home she got behind the wheel of her own vehicle and was killed instantly when she crashed it into three parked cars. Manson is reported to have said there were no alcohol or other drugs at the party. St. John's lawyer asked "[if] there were no drinks, no drugs, why would she need a designated driver?"[63] The suit alleged Syme was returning to the party at Manson's request. The case was dismissed on May 29, 2003.[65]
On August 2, 2007, former band member Stephen Bier filed a lawsuit against Manson for unpaid "partnership proceeds," seeking $20 million in back pay. Several details from the lawsuit leaked to the press.[66][67] In November 2007, additional papers were filed saying that Manson purchased a child's skeleton and masks made of human skin. He also allegedly bought stuffed animals, such as a grizzly bear and two baboons and a collection of Nazi memorabilia.[68] In December 2007, Manson countersued, claiming that Bier failed to fulfill his duties as a bandmember to play for recordings and to promote the band.[69] On December 28, 2009, the suit was settled with an agreement which saw Bier's attorneys being paid a total of $380,000, of which Manson's insurance company paid $175,000, while the remainder was paid by Bier's former business managers, according to Manson's lawyer Howard King.[70]
Discography[edit]



 Manson performing in 2007.
For a more comprehensive list, see Marilyn Manson discography.
The Manson Family Album (1993)
Portrait of an American Family (1994)
Smells Like Children (1995)
Antichrist Superstar (1996)
Remix & Repent (1997)
Mechanical Animals (1998)
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000)
The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003)
Lest We Forget: The Best Of (2004)
Eat Me, Drink Me (2007)
The High End of Low (2009)
Born Villain (2012)
The Pale Emperor (2015)
Special features[edit]
1992 Nine Inch Nails - Broken - "Gave Up"
1997 Rasputina - Transylvanian Regurgitations - "Transylvanian Concubine (The Manson Mix)"
1998 DMX - Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood - "The Omen (Damien II)"
2000 Eminem - The Way I Am - "The Way I Am (Danny Lohner & Marilyn Manson remix)"
2001 Godhead - 2000 Years of Human Error - "Break You Down"
2002 Linkin Park - Reanimation - "By_myslf (remix of By Myself by Marilyn Manson)"
2009 Lady Gaga - LoveGame - "LoveGame (Chew Fu GhettoHouse Fix)"
2013 Skylar Grey - Can't Haunt Me - "Can't Haunt Me"
2013 Avril Lavigne - Avril Lavigne - "Bad Girl"
2013 Mr. Oizo - Amicalement EP - "Solid (feat. Marilyn Manson)"
2014 Emigrate - Silent So Long - "Hypothetical (feat. Marilyn Manson)"
2015 Marilyn Manson Guest DJ On "IHeartRadio"
Tours[edit]
2015 Co-Headlining North American 2015 End Times Tour With The Smashing Pumpkins: The tour begins in Concord, CA at the Concord Pavilion on July 7 & is scheduled to wrap with a concert in Cincinnati, OH at the Riverbend Music Center on August 8.[71]
Awards and nominations[edit]
Grammy Awards

Year
Nominated work
Award
Result
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Hard Rock Performance Nominated
2001 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2004 "mOBSCENE" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2013 "No Reflection" Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance[72] Nominated
MTV Video Music Awards

Year
Nominated work
Award
Result
1996 "Sweet Dreams(Are Made of This)" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
1997 "The Beautiful People" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
Best Special Effects in a Video Nominated
Best Art Direction in a Video Nominated
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Cinematography in a Video Won
Metal Edge Readers' Choice Awards
Year Winner Category
1997 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" Best Song From a Movie Soundtrack[73]
1999 Marilyn Manson Live Performer of the Year
1998 God Is In The TV Home Video of the Year[74]
2000 Marilyn Manson Male Performer of the Year[75]
Kerrang Awards

Year
Nominee
Award
Result
2015 Marilyn Manson Lifetime achievement award[76] Won
Filmography[edit]
Lost Highway (1997)
"Groupie" (Unreleased)
Celebrity Deathmatch (1998)
Jawbreaker (1999)
Clone High (2002)
Bowling for Columbine (2002)
The Hire: Beat the Devil (2003)
Party Monster (2003)
The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things (2004)
Area 51 (2005)
Rise: Blood Hunter (2006)
Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! (2010)
Splatter Sisters (unreleased)
Born Villain (2011)
Wrong Cops (2012)
Californication (2013)
Celebrity Ghost Stories[77]
Eastbound & Down (2013)
Once Upon a Time (TV series) (2013) Peter Pan's Shadow
Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll (In production)
Sons of Anarchy (2014) (Ron Tully)
Books[edit]
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks, 1998 ISBN 0-06-039258-4.
Holy Wood. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks, Unreleased.
Genealogies of Pain. Nuremberg: Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg, 2011 ISBN 978-3-86984-129-8.
Campaign. Calabasas: Grassy Slope Incorporated, 2011 ASIN B005J24ZHS.
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58.Jump up ^ Smyntek, John (September 10, 2003). "Names & faces". Detroit Free Press (Gannett Company). p. 2D.
59.Jump up ^ Potts, Laura (August 17, 2001). "Manson charged with assault". South Bend Tribune (Schurz Communications). p. A2.
60.Jump up ^ "Judge rules rocker's act not a sexual one". The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia Media Network). January 2, 2002. p. E2.
61.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson ordered to pay fine for assault". National Post (Postmedia Network Inc.). June 20, 2002. p. AL6.
62.Jump up ^ Derakhshani, Tirdad (February 19, 2004). "Marilyn Manson gyration suit is settled". The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia Media Network). p. D2.
63.^ Jump up to: a b c Vineyard, Jennifer (April 9, 2002). "Manson May Fight Wrongful Death Suit With Countersuit". MTV news. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
64.Jump up ^ Vineyard, Jennifer (April 3, 2002). "Marilyn Manson Accused Of Contributing To Friend's Death". MTV. Retrieved June 14, 2010.
65.Jump up ^ "Los Angeles Superior Court – Civil Case Summary".
66.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson is a fraudulent Nazi artifacts collector says former bandmember". SIDE-LINE.com. August 6, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
67.Jump up ^ "MARILYN MANSON Sued By Former Keyboardist/Drummer Over 'Partnership Proceeds'". BLABBERMOUTH.NET. August 2, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
68.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Accused of Buying Child's Skeleton, Human Skin Masks". FOX News. November 23, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
69.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson files countersuit against ex-bandmate Stephen Bier". SIDE-LINE.com. December 25, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
70.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Settles Lawsuit With Former Band Member Stephen Bier" www.metalunderground.com. Access date: February 15, 2011.
71.Jump up ^ "Smashing Pumpkins & Marilyn Manson Co-Headlining North American 2015 End Times Tour Schedule". April 7, 2015. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
72.Jump up ^ "Frank Ocean, fun. Lead 2013 Grammy Award Nominations". Retrieved 2014-01-12.
73.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, June 1998
74.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, July 2000
75.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, June 2001
76.Jump up ^ http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-marilyn-manson-kerrang-lifetime-achievement-award-20150612-story.html, 2015
77.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Ancient Text: Celebrity Ghost Stories Full Episodes and Videos". Biography.com. 1907-08-08. Retrieved 2013-08-27.
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Marilyn Manson

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This article is about the person. For the band, see Marilyn Manson (band).

Marilyn Manson
Marilyn Manson.jpg
Manson performing in 2009

Background information

Birth name
Brian Hugh Warner
Born
January 5, 1969 (age 46)
Canton, Ohio, U.S.
Genres
Industrial metal, industrial rock, alternative metal, shock rock, electro-industrial, gothic rock, heavy metal, glam rock, hard rock
Occupation(s)
Singer-songwriter, musician, poet, actor, painter
Instruments
Vocals
Years active
1989–present
Labels
Nothing, Hell, etc., Cooking Vinyl, Loma Vista Recordings
Associated acts
Marilyn Manson (band), Nine Inch Nails, Godhead, Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Zombie, Mrs. Scabtree, Jack Off Jill, Trent Reznor, Alice Cooper, Rammstein, Avril Lavigne
Brian Hugh Warner (born January 5, 1969), known professionally as Marilyn Manson, is an American musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actor, painter, multimedia artist, and former music journalist. He is known for his controversial stage personality and image as the eponymous lead singer of the band Marilyn Manson, which he co-founded with Daisy Berkowitz and of which he remains the only constant member. His stage name was formed by juxtaposing the names of two American cultural icons, namely actress Marilyn Monroe and murderer Charles Manson.[1][2][3]
He is best known for his band's records released in the 1990s, most notably Antichrist Superstar and Mechanical Animals, which along with his public image earned him a reputation in the mainstream media as a controversial figure and a negative influence on young people.[4][5] In the U.S. alone, three of the band's albums have been awarded platinum and three more went gold, and the band has had eight releases debut in the top ten, including two number-one albums. Manson has been ranked number 44 in the Top 100 Heavy Metal Vocalists by Hit Parader, and has been nominated for four Grammy Awards.
Manson made his film debut in 1997, as an actor in David Lynch's Lost Highway. Since then he has appeared in a variety of minor roles and cameos. He was interviewed in Michael Moore's political documentary Bowling for Columbine, discussing possible motivations for the 1999 Columbine massacre and allegations that his music was somehow a factor. On September 13–14, 2002, his first art show, The Golden Age of Grotesque, was held at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions center. Manson revealed a series of 20 paintings in 2010 entitled Genealogies of Pain, an exhibition showcased at Vienna's Kunsthalle gallery,[6] which the artist collaborated on with David Lynch.


Contents  [hide]
1 Early life and education
2 Career 2.1 Music
2.2 Film and television
2.3 Art
2.4 Video games
2.5 Other
3 Relationships
4 Lawsuits
5 Discography
6 Special features
7 Tours
8 Awards and nominations
9 Filmography
10 Books
11 References
12 External links

Early life and education[edit]
Manson was born in Canton, Ohio. He is the only son of Barbara Warner (née Wyer) and Hugh Warner.[7] Manson is of German and English descent.[7][8][9] In his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell, he detailed his grandfather's sexual fetishes, including bestiality and sadomasochism. As a child, he attended his mother's Episcopal church, though his father was a Catholic.[10][11] Warner attended Heritage Christian School from first grade to tenth grade. In that school, they tried to show children what music they were not supposed to listen to; Warner then fell in love with "what he wasn't supposed to do."[12] He later transferred to GlenOak High School and graduated from there in 1987. After relocating with his parents, he became a student at Broward Community College in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in 1990. He was working towards a degree in journalism and gaining experience in the field by writing articles for a music magazine, 25th Parallel. He soon met several of the musicians to whom his own band were later compared, including My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult, The Perfect, and Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.
Career[edit]
Music[edit]
Main article: Marilyn Manson (band)
Manson and guitarist Scott Putesky formed Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids following conversations at the Reunion Room in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 1989.[13] The name was later shortened to Marilyn Manson. While with The Spooky Kids, Manson was involved with Jeordie White (also known as Twiggy Ramirez) and Stephen Gregory Bier Jr. (also known as Madonna Wayne Gacy) in two side-projects: Satan on Fire, a faux-Christian metal ensemble where he played bass guitar, and drums in Mrs. Scabtree, a collaborative band formed with White and then girlfriend Jessicka (vocalist with the band Jack Off Jill) as a way to combat contractual agreements that prohibited Marilyn Manson from playing in certain clubs. In 1993, the band drew the attention of Trent Reznor. Reznor produced their 1994 debut album, Portrait of an American Family and released it on his Nothing Records label. The band began to develop a cult following, which grew larger on the Downward Spiral Tour that featured Nine Inch Nails and Jim Rose Circus along with the release of Smells Like Children in 1995. That EP yielded the band's first big MTV hit with "Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)," a cover of the 1983 Eurythmics hit. Antichrist Superstar (co-produced by Trent Reznor) was an even greater success.[14]
In the U.S. alone, three of the band's albums have been awarded two platinum and three more went gold, and the band has had seven releases debut in the top ten, including two number-one albums. Manson first worked as a producer with the band Jack Off Jill. He helped name the band and produced most of the band's early recordings, and also played guitar on the song "My Cat" and had the band open most of his South Florida shows.[15] Manson later wrote the liner notes to the band's album Humid Teenage Mediocrity 1992–1996, a collection of early Jack Off Jill recordings. Manson has appeared as a guest performer on DMX's album Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood[16] and on Godhead's 2000 Years of Human Error album — the only album released on his vanity label Posthuman.[17][18] In 2011 it was revealed that Manson was to appear on the singer Skylar Grey's album "Invinsible" on the track entitled "Can't Haunt Me". Manson released his eighth studio album "Born Villain" in May 2012.
On November 10, 2014 Manson posted via his official Facebook page that his ninth studio album,The Pale Emperor, would be released on January 20, 2015.
Film and television[edit]



 Manson at the 2006 Festival de Cannes


 Manson in December 2007
Manson made his film debut in 1997, as an actor in David Lynch's Lost Highway. Since then he has appeared in a variety of minor roles and cameos, including Party Monster; then-girlfriend Rose McGowan's 1999 film Jawbreaker; Asia Argento's 2004 film The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things; Rise; The Hire: Beat The Devil, the sixth installment in the BMW Films series; and Showtime's comedy-drama TV series Californication in 2013, in which Manson portrayed himself. He also appeared on HBO's Eastbound & Down,[19] of which Manson is reportedly a longtime fan,[20] and had lobbied to appear on for years; and ABC's Once Upon a Time, for which he will provide the voice of the character "Shadow".
He was interviewed in Michael Moore's political documentary Bowling for Columbine discussing possible motivations for the Columbine massacre and allegations that his music was somehow a factor. He has appeared in animated form in Clone High and participated in several episodes of the MTV series Celebrity Deathmatch, becoming the show's unofficial champion and mascot; he often performed the voice for his claymated puppet, and contributed the song "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" to the soundtrack album. In July 2005, Manson told Rolling Stone that he was shifting his focus from music to filmmaking – "I just don't think the world is worth putting music into right now. I no longer want to make art that other people — particularly record companies — are turning into a product. I just want to make art."
Johnny Depp reportedly used Manson as his inspiration for his performance as Willy Wonka in the film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Manson himself expressed interest in playing the role of Willy Wonka in the film.[21][22][unreliable source?]
He had been working on his directorial debut, Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll, a project that has been in development hell since 2004, with Manson also set to portray the role of Lewis Carroll, author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Initially announced as a web-only release, it was later decided to give the estimated $4.2 million budget film a conventional cinema release, with a slated release date of mid-2007. The film was to have an original music soundtrack with previously unreleased songs.[23] Production of the film had been postponed indefinitely until after the Eat Me, Drink Me tour.[24] In 2010, studio bosses shut down production on the project, reportedly due to viewers' responses to the violent content of clips released on the internet. The film was later officially put on "indefinite production hold".[25] However, according to an interview with co-writer Anthony Silva about the hold, the film was still on and the talk of it being shut down was just a myth.[26] In a June 2013 interview, Manson stated that he had "resurrected" the project, and that Roger Avary would direct it.[27] In a separate interview during the previous year, he said a small crew similar to what he used for his Slo-Mo-Tion music video would be used, and would rather film the movie on an iPhone than not film it at all.
Manson appeared in the final season of the TV series, "Sons of Anarchy", as Ron Tully, a white supremacist.[28]
Art[edit]
Manson stated in a 2004 interview with i-D magazine to have begun his career as a watercolor painter in 1999 when he made five-minute concept pieces and sold them to drug dealers. On September 13–14, 2002, his first show, The Golden Age of Grotesque, was held at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions Centre. Art in America‍ '​s Max Henry likened them to the works of a "psychiatric patient given materials to use as therapy" and said his work would never be taken seriously in a fine art context, writing that the value was "in their celebrity, not the work".[29] On September 14–15, 2004, Manson held a second exhibition on the first night in Paris and the second in Berlin. The show was named 'Trismegistus' which was also the title of the center piece of the exhibit – a large, three-headed Christ painted onto an antique wood panel from a portable embalmers table.
Manson named his self-proclaimed art movement Celebritarian Corporation. He has coined a slogan for the movement: “We will sell our shadow to those who stand within it.” In 2005 he said that the Celebritarian Corporation has been "incubating for seven years" which if correct would indicate that Celebritarian Corporation, in some form, started in 1998.[30]
Celebritarian Corporation is also the namesake of an art gallery owned by Manson, called the Celebritarian Corporation Gallery of Fine Art in Los Angeles for which his third exhibition was the inaugural show. From April 2–17, 2007, his recent works were on show at the Space 39 Modern & Contemporary art gallery in Fort Myers, Florida. Forty pieces from this show traveled to Germany's Gallery Brigitte Schenk in Cologne to be publicly exhibited from June 28 – July 28, 2007. Manson was refused admittance to Kölner Dom (Cologne Cathedral), when he was in the city to attend the opening night. This was, according to Manson, because of his makeup.
Manson revealed a series of 20 paintings in 2010 entitled Genealogies of Pain, an exhibition showcased at Vienna's Kunsthalle gallery[6] which the artist collaborated on with David Lynch.
Video games[edit]
Manson made an appearance in the video game Area 51 as Edgar, a Grey Alien. His song "Cruci-Fiction in Space" is featured in a commercial for a video game, The Darkness. His likeness is also featured on the Celebrity Deathmatch video game for which he recorded a song for the soundtrack (2003). The song "Use Your Fist and Not Your Mouth" was the credits score of the game Cold Fear as well as Spawn: Armageddon. The song "Four Rusted Horses" had an alternate version used in trailers for the video game Fear 3. A remix of the song "Tainted Love" appears in the debut trailer for the game, Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit and in the launch trailer of Twisted Metal. Manson's song "The Beautiful People" was featured in WWE SmackDown! Shut Your Mouth, KickBeat and Brütal Legend. The song "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" is also featured in Saints Row: The Third. His music video to the song "Personal Jesus" was used in some parts of the Buzz! game series.



 Manson during the Mechanical Animals Tour.
Other[edit]
Manson launched "Mansinthe", his own brand of Swiss-made absinthe, which has received mixed reviews; some critics described the taste as being "just plain",[31] but it came second to Versinthe in an Absinthe top five[32] and won a gold medal at the 2008 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.[33] Other reviewers, such as critics at The Wormwood Society, have given the absinthe moderately high praise.[34]
In 2015, Manson stated he was no longer drinking absinthe. [35]
An energy drink called "Eat Me, Drink Me" was also produced for a limited time, inspired by Marilyn Manson's album of the same name.
Relationships[edit]
Manson was engaged to actress Rose McGowan from February 1998 to January 19, 2001.[36] McGowan later ended their two-year-long engagement over "lifestyle differences".
Manson and Dita Von Teese first met when he asked her to dance in one of his music videos. Though she was unable to, the two kept in contact. On his 32nd birthday, in 2001, she arrived with a bottle of absinthe and they became a couple. Manson proposed on March 22, 2004 and gave her a 1930s, 7-carat, European round-cut diamond engagement ring. On November 28, 2005, Manson and von Teese were married in a private, non-denominational ceremony in their home. A larger ceremony was held on December 3, at Gurteen Castle, in Kilsheelan, County Tipperary, Ireland, the home of their friend, Gottfried Helnwein. The wedding was officiated by the Chilean surrealist film director and comic book writer Alejandro Jodorowsky.[37] On December 30, 2006, Von Teese filed for divorce due to "irreconcilable differences."[38] ET.com and People claimed that Manson was having an extramarital affair with then 19-year-old actress Evan Rachel Wood, who co-starred in his horror film Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll, and was featured in the video for his 2007 single, "Heart-Shaped Glasses."[39][40] The relationship was confirmed by Von Teese in an interview with the Sunday Telegraph: "I wasn't supportive about his partying or his relationship with another girl, and as much as I loved him I wasn't going to be part of that."[41] Manson's alcohol abuse and distant behavior were also cited as cause for the split.[42] A judgment of divorce was entered in Los Angeles Superior Court on December 27, 2007.[43]
In 2007, attention was brought to Manson's love life again when a relationship with Evan Rachel Wood was made public.[44] Manson and Wood reportedly maintained an on-again off-again relationship for several years. Manson proposed to Wood during a Paris stage performance in January 2010, but the couple broke off the engagement later that year.[45]
In the March 2012 issue of Revolver magazine, American photographer Lindsay Usich was referred to as Manson's girlfriend. The article referenced a new painting by Manson featuring Usich. She is credited as the photo source for the cover art of Manson's 2012 album, Born Villain. It was later confirmed that the two were romantically involved.[46][47] In February 2015 Manson told Beat magazine that he is "newly single".[48]
Lawsuits[edit]
In September 1996, former bassist Gidget Gein negotiated a settlement with Manson where he would receive $17,500 in cash, 20 percent of any royalties paid for recordings and for any songs he had a hand in writing and his share of any other royalties or fees the group earned while he was a member. Furthermore, the settlement allowed him to market himself as a former member of Marilyn Manson. This settlement was not honored, however.[49]
Former guitarist and founding member Scott Putesky (aka Daisy Berkowitz) filed a $15 million lawsuit in a Fort Lauderdale court against the singer, the band and the band's attorney (David Codikow) in January 1998 after his forcible departure from the group in the spring of 1996. Berkowitz claimed he was cheated by the band out of "thousands of dollars in royalties, publishing rights, and performance fees." He also filed an attorney malpractice suit against Codikow, alleging that "Codikow represented Warner's interests more than the band's and that he gave Warner disproportionate control over the band's name, recordings, merchandising, and touring proceeds."[50][51] By October of that year, the suit had been settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.[52]
On November 30, 1998, a few days after the band accumulated "[a] total [of] more than $25,000" in backstage and hotel room damages during the Poughkeepsie, New York stop of their Mechanical Animals Tour,[53] SPIN editor Craig Marks filed a $24 million lawsuit against Manson and his bodyguards for allegedly assaulting his person and threatening to kill his family. According to Marks' interview with the New York Post, the issue stemmed from Manson's displeasure with the magazine's decision to renege on a promised cover story of the band for their January 1999 cover. According to Marks, the last-minute change was made because Manson's record wasn't "performing." The Post described the editor as "bruised and battered." Manson for his part issued a statement saying, "I had a conversation with Craig Marks expressing I was tired of Spin's immature business behavior and the series of deals they had broken with me. I told him that I didn't care what he prints or whether or not I'm on the cover. I simply no longer wanted to work with him or his magazine that obviously has a lack of respect for musicians and their fans."
On February 19, 1999, Manson counter-sued Marks for libel, slander and defamation. The singer was seeking $40 million in reparation, claiming that Marks' statements were false and "were made ... with actual malice, hatred and personal ill will." According to the counter-suit, Marks' allegations have "greatly damaged and injured [Manson's] reputation and standing in the music profession, in the music and entertainment industries, in his community and in the general public, and has been subjected to great shame, humiliation and indignity."[54] As for the Poughkeepsie incident, Manson apologized and offered to make financial restitution.[55][56]
In a civil battery suit, David Diaz, a security officer from a concert in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on October 27, 2000, sued for $75,000 in a Minneapolis federal court.[57] The federal court jury found in Manson's favor.[58]
In a civil suit presented by Oakland County, Michigan, Manson was charged with sexual misconduct against another security officer, Joshua Keasler, during a concert in Clarkston, Michigan, on July 30, 2001. Oakland County originally filed assault and battery and criminal sexual misconduct charges,[59] but the judge reduced the latter charge to misdemeanor disorderly conduct.[60] Manson pleaded no contest to the reduced charges, paid a $4,000 fine,[61] and later settled the lawsuit under undisclosed terms.[62]
On April 3, 2002, Maria St. John filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court accusing Manson of providing her adult daughter, Jennifer Syme, with cocaine and instructing her to drive while under the influence.[63] After attending a party at Manson's house, Syme was given a lift home;[64] Manson claims she was taken home by a designated driver.[63] After she got home she got behind the wheel of her own vehicle and was killed instantly when she crashed it into three parked cars. Manson is reported to have said there were no alcohol or other drugs at the party. St. John's lawyer asked "[if] there were no drinks, no drugs, why would she need a designated driver?"[63] The suit alleged Syme was returning to the party at Manson's request. The case was dismissed on May 29, 2003.[65]
On August 2, 2007, former band member Stephen Bier filed a lawsuit against Manson for unpaid "partnership proceeds," seeking $20 million in back pay. Several details from the lawsuit leaked to the press.[66][67] In November 2007, additional papers were filed saying that Manson purchased a child's skeleton and masks made of human skin. He also allegedly bought stuffed animals, such as a grizzly bear and two baboons and a collection of Nazi memorabilia.[68] In December 2007, Manson countersued, claiming that Bier failed to fulfill his duties as a bandmember to play for recordings and to promote the band.[69] On December 28, 2009, the suit was settled with an agreement which saw Bier's attorneys being paid a total of $380,000, of which Manson's insurance company paid $175,000, while the remainder was paid by Bier's former business managers, according to Manson's lawyer Howard King.[70]
Discography[edit]



 Manson performing in 2007.
For a more comprehensive list, see Marilyn Manson discography.
The Manson Family Album (1993)
Portrait of an American Family (1994)
Smells Like Children (1995)
Antichrist Superstar (1996)
Remix & Repent (1997)
Mechanical Animals (1998)
Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) (2000)
The Golden Age of Grotesque (2003)
Lest We Forget: The Best Of (2004)
Eat Me, Drink Me (2007)
The High End of Low (2009)
Born Villain (2012)
The Pale Emperor (2015)
Special features[edit]
1992 Nine Inch Nails - Broken - "Gave Up"
1997 Rasputina - Transylvanian Regurgitations - "Transylvanian Concubine (The Manson Mix)"
1998 DMX - Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood - "The Omen (Damien II)"
2000 Eminem - The Way I Am - "The Way I Am (Danny Lohner & Marilyn Manson remix)"
2001 Godhead - 2000 Years of Human Error - "Break You Down"
2002 Linkin Park - Reanimation - "By_myslf (remix of By Myself by Marilyn Manson)"
2009 Lady Gaga - LoveGame - "LoveGame (Chew Fu GhettoHouse Fix)"
2013 Skylar Grey - Can't Haunt Me - "Can't Haunt Me"
2013 Avril Lavigne - Avril Lavigne - "Bad Girl"
2013 Mr. Oizo - Amicalement EP - "Solid (feat. Marilyn Manson)"
2014 Emigrate - Silent So Long - "Hypothetical (feat. Marilyn Manson)"
2015 Marilyn Manson Guest DJ On "IHeartRadio"
Tours[edit]
2015 Co-Headlining North American 2015 End Times Tour With The Smashing Pumpkins: The tour begins in Concord, CA at the Concord Pavilion on July 7 & is scheduled to wrap with a concert in Cincinnati, OH at the Riverbend Music Center on August 8.[71]
Awards and nominations[edit]
Grammy Awards

Year
Nominated work
Award
Result
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Hard Rock Performance Nominated
2001 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2004 "mOBSCENE" Best Metal Performance Nominated
2013 "No Reflection" Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance[72] Nominated
MTV Video Music Awards

Year
Nominated work
Award
Result
1996 "Sweet Dreams(Are Made of This)" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
1997 "The Beautiful People" Best Hard Rock Video Nominated
Best Special Effects in a Video Nominated
Best Art Direction in a Video Nominated
1999 "The Dope Show" Best Cinematography in a Video Won
Metal Edge Readers' Choice Awards
Year Winner Category
1997 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" Best Song From a Movie Soundtrack[73]
1999 Marilyn Manson Live Performer of the Year
1998 God Is In The TV Home Video of the Year[74]
2000 Marilyn Manson Male Performer of the Year[75]
Kerrang Awards

Year
Nominee
Award
Result
2015 Marilyn Manson Lifetime achievement award[76] Won
Filmography[edit]
Lost Highway (1997)
"Groupie" (Unreleased)
Celebrity Deathmatch (1998)
Jawbreaker (1999)
Clone High (2002)
Bowling for Columbine (2002)
The Hire: Beat the Devil (2003)
Party Monster (2003)
The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things (2004)
Area 51 (2005)
Rise: Blood Hunter (2006)
Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! (2010)
Splatter Sisters (unreleased)
Born Villain (2011)
Wrong Cops (2012)
Californication (2013)
Celebrity Ghost Stories[77]
Eastbound & Down (2013)
Once Upon a Time (TV series) (2013) Peter Pan's Shadow
Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Lewis Carroll (In production)
Sons of Anarchy (2014) (Ron Tully)
Books[edit]
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks, 1998 ISBN 0-06-039258-4.
Holy Wood. New York: HarperCollins division ReganBooks, Unreleased.
Genealogies of Pain. Nuremberg: Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg, 2011 ISBN 978-3-86984-129-8.
Campaign. Calabasas: Grassy Slope Incorporated, 2011 ASIN B005J24ZHS.
References[edit]
1.Jump up ^ Charles Manson Trial, 2violent.com.
2.Jump up ^ Manson, Marilyn (1998). The Long Hard Road out of Hell. HarperCollins. pp. 85–87. ISBN 0-06-098746-4.
3.Jump up ^ "Biography for Marilyn Manson". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved January 12, 2008.
4.Jump up ^ Greg, Glasgow (1999-04-23). "Marilyn Manson Concert Canceled" (BROADSHEET). The Daily Camera (Albert J. Manzi). MediaNews Group. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
5.Jump up ^ Cullen, Dave. Inside the Columbine High investigation. Salon News, September 23, 1999.
6.^ Jump up to: a b "Marilyn Manson's art 'scarier than music'". The Age (Melbourne). June 30, 2010.
7.^ Jump up to: a b According to his autobiography The Long Hard Road Out of Hell; "Marilyn Manson". PopularIssues.org. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
8.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson | EthniCelebs - Celebrity Ethnicity |What Nationality Background Ancestry Race". EthniCelebs. 1969-01-05. Retrieved 2012-09-06.
9.Jump up ^ "Ancestry of Marilyn Manson". Wargs.com. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
10.Jump up ^ Anthony DeCurtis. "Marilyn Manson: The Beliefnet Interview". Beliefnet.com. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
11.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Montrealmirror.com. July 24, 1997. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
12.Jump up ^ "4. Christian School".
13.Jump up ^ Hawk, Lucky (January 7, 2013). "Scott Mitchell Putesky (Daisy Berkowitz) Interview". Blankmaninc.com. Retrieved January 13, 2012.
14.Jump up ^ "Dangerous Creatures: Marilyn Manson have come for your Children". Guitar World. December 1996. Archived from the original on June 4, 2007. Retrieved June 21, 2007.
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16.Jump up ^ Manson Hooks Up With DMX October 23, 1998". Retrieved June 18, 2007.
17.Jump up ^ "Godhead Biography". MTV News. May 5, 1999. Retrieved June 18, 2007.
18.Jump up ^ "Manson Launches New Posthuman Label". NME. April 12, 2000. Retrieved March 31, 2011.
19.Jump up ^ Maeby, Liana (4 November 2013). "How weird was Marilyn Mansons cameo on Eastbound and Down?". Hitfix. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
20.Jump up ^ Vena, Jocelyn (8 September 2010). "Marilyn Manson ‘Obsessed’ With ‘Eastbound And Down,’ Director Says". MTV News. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
21.Jump up ^ Hoffman, Bill (January 31, 2001). "HELL ROCKER MANSON: I’LL PLAY WONKA AS ‘SATAN’". New York Post. New York Post. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
22.Jump up ^ "Charlie & the Chocolate Factory – Preview". Sci-Fi Movie Page. July 19, 2005. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
23.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson announces details first low budget film". SIDE-LINE.com. July 5, 2006. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
24.Jump up ^ "'Phantasmagoria' Film Still In Pipeline". BLABBERMOUTH.NET. July 13, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
25.Jump up ^ "Lily Cole | Cole's Violent Film Put On Indefinite Hold". Contactmusic. Retrieved 2012-04-15.
26.Jump up ^ "''Phantasmagoria: The Visions of Anthony Silva'' Exclusive Interview". Marilynmansonfrance.free.fr. Retrieved 2012-09-06.
27.Jump up ^ "Video Interview:2013/06/03 Larry King Now Marilyn Manson Interview". Mansonwiki.com. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
28.Jump up ^ "'Sons of Anarchy' casts Marilyn Manson in recurring role". EW.com. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
29.Jump up ^ Smith, Dakota (January 24, 2000). "Shocker! Marilyn Manson Can Paint, Art Critics Say". VH1 News. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
30.Jump up ^ Harris, Chris (October 28, 2005). "Marilyn Manson Likens His New Guitar God To A Naked Woman". MTV News. Retrieved September 27, 2007.
31.Jump up ^ "Absinthe Taste Test Part 3: Mansinthe (Marilyn Manson Absinthe)". Side-Line.com. September 4, 2008. Retrieved February 17, 2012.
32.Jump up ^ Ali, Erial (August 5, 2008). "Esquire Mansinthe 2nd in top five". Esquire.com. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
33.Jump up ^ [2][dead link]
34.Jump up ^ "Mansinthe - Prototype 35". Wormwoodsociety.org. Retrieved 2012-09-06.
35.Jump up ^ "Manson has own brand of absinthe but wants to be normal (Marilyn Manson Absinthe)". Retrieved June 15, 2015.
36.Jump up ^ Johnson, Tina (January 19, 2001). "And It Was So Close to Valentine's Day, Too". VH1. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
37.Jump up ^ Braund, Simon (October 2009). "All about Alejandro". Empire Magazine (Bauer Media Group). p. 139.
38.Jump up ^ "Rock star Manson set to divorce". BBC News. January 6, 2007. Retrieved February 16, 2008.
39.Jump up ^ Marilyn Manson's Alleged Affair ETonline.com January 10, 2006. Retrieved June 21, 2007.
40.Jump up ^ Ken Lee (January 9, 2007). "Marilyn Manson Dating Evan Rachel Wood". People Magazine. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
41.Jump up ^ Cutter, Kimberly (22 April 2007). "Educating Dita". Sunday Telegraph (London). Retrieved February 15, 2008.
42.Jump up ^ "Splitsville for Marilyn Manson and Dita Von Teese". SPIN. January 5, 2007. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
43.Jump up ^ "Manson-Von Teese marriage ended". United Press International. December 28, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
44.Jump up ^ Lee, Ken (January 9, 2007). "People Magazine". People.com. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
45.Jump up ^ Jennifer Garcia and Jessica Herndon. "Marilyn Manson and Evan Rachel Wood Call It Quits (Again!), Then Manson married Candace Barton from Newcastle NSW Australia they met at the Gateway Hotel in Islington". People.com.
46.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Admits He Might Want To Have A Child". The Huffington Post. July 16, 2012. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
47.Jump up ^ Betiku, Fehintola (August 18, 2012). "The apple obviously fell far from the tree... Marilyn Manson heads to a party with his dressed down Dad". Daily Mail. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
48.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson". Beat Magazine. February 2015.
49.Jump up ^ Pushing Up Daisy Berkowitz. City Link. Jane Musgrave. 1999.
50.Jump up ^ "Daisy Berkowitz Takes Marilyn Manson To Court". MTV News. January 26, 1998. Retrieved March 21, 2011.
51.Jump up ^ Bendersky, Ari (September 24, 1997). "Marilyn Manson Sued By Former Member". Rolling Stone. Retrieved June 8, 2011.
52.Jump up ^ "Manson Settles Daisy Berkowitz Lawsuit, Denies Label Pressured Him To Do So". MTV News. October 14, 1998. Retrieved March 21, 2011.
53.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Wrecks Backstage Area, Hotel Rooms In Rock & Roll Melee". MTV News. November 25, 1998. Retrieved March 21, 2011.
54.Jump up ^ "Manson Countersues Ex-Spin Editor For $40M". VH1. February 20, 1999. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
55.Jump up ^ "Did Manson "Spin" Out Of Control?". MTV News. November 30, 1998. Retrieved March 21, 2011.
56.Jump up ^ John Pecorelli (April 1999). "MansonWorld". Alternative Press (#129): 44–52.
57.Jump up ^ Gustafson, Paul (September 6, 2003). "No verdict yet in Marilyn Manson trial". Star Tribune (The Star Tribune Company). p. 9B.
58.Jump up ^ Smyntek, John (September 10, 2003). "Names & faces". Detroit Free Press (Gannett Company). p. 2D.
59.Jump up ^ Potts, Laura (August 17, 2001). "Manson charged with assault". South Bend Tribune (Schurz Communications). p. A2.
60.Jump up ^ "Judge rules rocker's act not a sexual one". The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia Media Network). January 2, 2002. p. E2.
61.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson ordered to pay fine for assault". National Post (Postmedia Network Inc.). June 20, 2002. p. AL6.
62.Jump up ^ Derakhshani, Tirdad (February 19, 2004). "Marilyn Manson gyration suit is settled". The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia Media Network). p. D2.
63.^ Jump up to: a b c Vineyard, Jennifer (April 9, 2002). "Manson May Fight Wrongful Death Suit With Countersuit". MTV news. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
64.Jump up ^ Vineyard, Jennifer (April 3, 2002). "Marilyn Manson Accused Of Contributing To Friend's Death". MTV. Retrieved June 14, 2010.
65.Jump up ^ "Los Angeles Superior Court – Civil Case Summary".
66.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson is a fraudulent Nazi artifacts collector says former bandmember". SIDE-LINE.com. August 6, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
67.Jump up ^ "MARILYN MANSON Sued By Former Keyboardist/Drummer Over 'Partnership Proceeds'". BLABBERMOUTH.NET. August 2, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
68.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Accused of Buying Child's Skeleton, Human Skin Masks". FOX News. November 23, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
69.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson files countersuit against ex-bandmate Stephen Bier". SIDE-LINE.com. December 25, 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
70.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson Settles Lawsuit With Former Band Member Stephen Bier" www.metalunderground.com. Access date: February 15, 2011.
71.Jump up ^ "Smashing Pumpkins & Marilyn Manson Co-Headlining North American 2015 End Times Tour Schedule". April 7, 2015. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
72.Jump up ^ "Frank Ocean, fun. Lead 2013 Grammy Award Nominations". Retrieved 2014-01-12.
73.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, June 1998
74.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, July 2000
75.Jump up ^ Metal Edge, June 2001
76.Jump up ^ http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-marilyn-manson-kerrang-lifetime-achievement-award-20150612-story.html, 2015
77.Jump up ^ "Marilyn Manson - Ancient Text: Celebrity Ghost Stories Full Episodes and Videos". Biography.com. 1907-08-08. Retrieved 2013-08-27.
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Studio albums
Portrait of an American Family ·
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"Get Your Gunn" ·
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 "Tourniquet" ·
 "Long Hard Road Out of Hell" ·
 "The Dope Show" ·
 "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" ·
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 "mOBSCENE" ·
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 "The Nobodies: 2005 Against All Gods Mix" ·
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 "Putting Holes in Happiness" ·
 "Arma-Goddamn-Motherfuckin-Geddon" ·
 "No Reflection" ·
 "Slo-Mo-Tion" ·
 "Deep Six"
 

Promotional
"Dope Hat" ·
 "Antichrist Superstar" ·
 "Man That You Fear" ·
 "Coma White" ·
 "Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes" ·
 "(s)AINT" ·
 "You and Me and the Devil Makes 3" ·
 "We're from America" ·
 "Hey Cruel World..." ·
 "Third Day of a Seven Day Binge" ·
 "Cupid Carries a Gun" ·
 "The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles"
 


Video albums
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Books
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 ISNI: 0000 0001 1049 6263 ·
 GND: 121603024 ·
 BNF: cb14424300m (data) ·
 MusicBrainz: 80cadd99-f560-41e3-babd-16292bbd248a ·
 NDL: 00731576
 

   


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